Sabine Diedrich

Robert Koch Institut, Berlín, Berlin, Germany

Are you Sabine Diedrich?

Claim your profile

Publications (36)87.91 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We used physician sentinel surveillance to identify 25 (7.7%) mild to severe infections with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in children and adults among 325 outpatients with acute respiratory infections in Germany during August-October 2014. Results suggested low-level circulation of enterovirus D68 in Germany. Viruses were characterized by sequencing viral protein (VP) 1 and VP4/VP2 genomic regions.
    Emerging Infectious Diseases 05/2015; 21(5):837-841. DOI:10.3201/eid2105.141900 · 7.33 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2010, a large outbreak of poliomyelitis with unusual 47% lethality occurred in Pointe Noire, Republic of Congo. Vaccine-mediated immunity against the outbreak virus was never investigated. A wild poliovirus 1 (WPV1) isolated from a fatal case (termed PV1-RC2010) showed a previously unknown combination of amino acid exchanges in critical antigenic site 2 (AgS2, VP1 capsid protein positions 221SAAL→221PADL). These exchanges were also detected in an additional 11 WPV1 strains from fatal cases. PV1-RC2010 escaped neutralization by three different mAbs relevant for AgS2. Virus neutralization was tested in sera from fatal cases, who died before supplementary immunization (n = 24), Gabonese recipients of recent oral polio vaccination (n = 12), routinely vaccinated German medical students (n = 34), and German outpatients tested for antipoliovirus immunity (n = 17) on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human epidermoid carcinoma 2 cells. Fatal poliomyelitis cases gave laboratory evidence of previous trivalent vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titers against PV1-RC2010 were significantly lower than those against the vaccine strain Sabin-1, two genetically distinct WPV1s isolated in 1965 and 2010 and two genetically distinct vaccine-derived PV strains. Of German vaccinees tested according to World Health Organization protocols, 15-29% were unprotected according to their neutralization titers (<1:8 serum dilution), even though all were protected against Sabin-1. Phylogenetic analysis of the WPV1 outbreak strains suggested a recent introduction of virus progenitors from Asia with formation of separate Angolan and Congolese lineages. Only the latter carried both critical AgS2 mutations. Antigenetically variant PVs may become relevant during the final phase of poliomyelitis eradication in populations with predominantly vaccine-derived immunity. Sustained vaccination coverage and clinical and environmental surveillance will be necessary.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2014; 111(35). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1323502111 · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The study describes genetic characterization of poliovirus (PV) strains isolated from sewage samples in Poland. The analyses were performed for the detection of any putative polio revertants and recombinants in three genomic regions by sequencing analysis. Thirty-six strains were analyzed. The analyzed strains were identified by neutralization assay as 7 strains of serotype P1, 10 strains of serotype P2, and 19 strains of serotype P3. Sewage isolates were sequenced in 5'UTR, VP1, and 3D genomic regions. All detected PVs were classified as vaccine strains on the basis of VP1 sequence. Mutational differences in the VP1 sequences of isolated viruses ranged from 0.0% to 0.4%, indicating a limited replication period. The genetic analysis of the 3D region showed that some strains have recombinant genomes. Nine strains were found as dipartite recombinants (seven strains-S3/S2, one strain-S2/S1, one strain-S3/S1), while one strain was found as tripartite recombinant (S3/S2/S1). No recombinants with non-PV enteroviruses were identified. None of wild-type PVs or vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) were detected. This study showed the absence of wild or VDPV circulation in the country and demonstrated the usefulness of environmental surveillance in addition to acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in support of polio eradication initiatives. J. Med. Virol. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Medical Virology 07/2014; 86(7). DOI:10.1002/jmv.23803 · 2.22 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction Enteroviruses commonly encounter babies and children and infections present in a wide variety of symptoms ranging from asymptomatic infection, benign illness, and aseptic meningitis, hand-foot-and-mouth disease to severe life-threatening disease. Some newborns develop severe disease in the first 2 weeks of life and long-term sequelae may occur among survivors. Case presentation We present a case report of a Caucasian newborn baby boy with severe encephalitis and systemic coxsackievirus B3 infection. The coincidence of maternal infection as well as previous mild respiratory illness in his sister suggests either prenatal or horizontal postnatal transmission. An electroencephalogram showed a severe pathologic pattern with theta-delta-rhythm and spike-wave complexes on both hemispheres. We also observed an unusual prolonged viremia for a period of 6 weeks. Due to the lack of specific antiviral treatment options, the supportive management included ventilation and medical treatment of seizures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a genogroup D2 virus previously exclusively detected in China and now described in Europe for the first time. Conclusions Enteroviral infection is an important differential diagnosis in neonatal encephalitis. Prolonged viremia must be taken into account and might correlate with disease severity. The newly observed enterovirus genotype D2 is spreading from Asia to other continents.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 05/2014; 8(1):164. DOI:10.1186/1752-1947-8-164
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Source: http://espid2015.kenes.com/PublishingImages/scientific-information/espid-abstracts/ESPID%202014%20abstracts.pdf Background and Aims: Human Parechovirus (HPeV) infections may cause a variety of clinical symptoms in children, but syndromic surveillance data are currently lacking. This study aims to assess HPeV-associated disease burden in infants and children with CNS-infection.Methods : The study was conducted in the context of a Quality Management Program at the Charité Department of Paediatrics. For detection of HPeV and molecular typing, stool samples were analysed at the National Reference Centre for Poliomyelitis and enteroviruses at the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin, Germany. Results: A 5 year-old Caucasian female resented with fatigue, acute hemiparesis/hyporeflexia and central facial paresis, recent febrile illness and PeV-positive stool, but no recent immunisations. CSF-analysis revealed 7 leukocytes (98% lymphocytes), negative bacterial and viral cultures, and oligoclonal IgG-bands. Multiple demyelinising lesions consistent with ADEM were confirmed by MRI and brain biopsy. The patient received high-dose i.v. methylprednisolone ollowed by oral prednisolone for three months. The patient recovered clinically, but ADEM lesions persisted up to six months after disease onset. Syndromic surveillance from 10/2010-12/2012 resulted in 284 paediatric cases of CNS-infection/inflammation. Of these, twelve cases (4.2%) showed RT-PCR-confirmed HPeV-infection with no alternative pathogen detected in routine care. HPeV-infection was significantly associated with age 1-4 years, seizures and rash (RR (95% CI) = 2.12(1.26-3.54), 2.16(1.39-3.34) and 4.25(2.21-8.16), P = 0.004, 0.001 and <0.0001, respectively).Conclusions : In hospitalised children, HPeV- infection may be associated with significant CNS disease, including post-infectious ADEM. In children <4 ears presenting with acute seizures and rash, HPeV should be included in the differential diagnosis.
    European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Dublin, Ireland; 05/2014
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to gain insights into the tempo and mode of the evolutionary processes that sustain genetic diversity in coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) and into the interplay with virus transmission. We estimated phylodynamic patterns with a large sample of virus strains collected in Europe with Bayesian statistical methods, reconstructed ancestral states of genealogical nodes, and tested for selection. The genealogies estimated with the structural 1D(VP1) and nonstructural 3CD loci allowed a precise description of lineages over time and co-circulating virus populations within the two CVB5 clades, genogroups A and B. Strong negative selection shaped the evolution of both loci but compelling phylogenetic data suggested that immune selection pressure resulted in the emergence of the two genogroups with opposed evolutionary pathways. The genogroups also differed in the temporal occurrence of the amino acid changes. The virus strains of genogroup A were characterized by sequential acquisition of nonsynonymous changes in residues exposed at the virus 5-fold axis. The genogroup B viruses were marked by selection of three changes in a different domain (VP1 C-terminus) during its early emergence. These external changes resulted in a selective sweep, which was followed by an evolutionary stasis still ongoing after 50 years. The inferred virus population history of CVB5 showed an alternation of the prevailing genogroup during meningitis epidemics across Europe and is interpreted as a consequence of partial cross-immunity.
    Journal of Virology 09/2013; DOI:10.1128/JVI.02075-13 · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Das Gesundheitswesen 03/2012; 74(03). DOI:10.1055/s-0032-1307288 · 0.62 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Benign acute childhood myositis (BACM) is a rare syndrome associated with various viral infections. Bilateral calve pain may lead to inability to walk. During winter 2007/2008, we investigated a nationwide outbreak of influenza-associated BACM (IA-BACM) to identify etiologic (sub)type, describe the course of disease, and explore how well the syndrome is known among physicians. We performed retrospective and prospective case finding in all German federal states. Physicians returned patient-based questionnaires containing information about sex, age, disease progression, patient-management, and number of BACM cases treated previously. We compared IA-BACM cases with influenza cases from the German virologic sentinel surveillance system for influenza. We investigated 219 children with IA-BACM. They coincided with the curve of influenza B of the German virologic sentinel surveillance system for influenza. Median age was 7 years, 74% (160/216) of cases were male, median time between the onset of fever and onset of BACM-symptoms was 3 days lasting for a median of 4 days. Almost half of the affected children had presented at hospitals. One case with beginning renal impairment occurred, but the patient recovered completely. Most reporting physicians had not seen BACM-patients previously. Multivariable analysis showed IA-BACM's strong association with influenza B, male sex, and age between 6 and 9 years. Influenza B caused a large BACM outbreak in Germany. Onset of BACM symptoms followed shortly after the onset of influenza symptoms. The course of this disease was almost exclusively mild and self-limiting. Diagnosis of this rare but distinct clinical entity by the alert physician can spare the patient potentially unneeded invasive testing and hospital admission.
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 08/2011; 30(8):e142-6. DOI:10.1097/INF.0b013e318217e356 · 3.14 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: EuroRotaNet, a laboratory network, was established in order to determine the diversity of co-circulating rotavirus strains in Europe over three or more rotavirus seasons from 2006/2007 and currently includes 16 countries. This report highlights the tremendous diversity of rotavirus strains co-circulating in the European population during three years of surveillance since 2006/2007 and points to the possible origins of these strains including genetic reassortment and interspecies transmission. Furthermore, the ability of the network to identify strains circulating with an incidence of ≥1% allowed the identification of possible emerging strains such as G8 and G12 since the beginning of the study; analysis of recent data indicates their increased incidence. The introduction of universal rotavirus vaccination in at least two of the participating countries, and partial vaccine coverage in some others may provide data on diversity driven by vaccine introduction and possible strain replacement in Europe.
    Epidemiology and Infection 06/2011; 139(6):895-909. DOI:10.1017/S0950268810001810 · 2.49 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In October 2007, the working group CEN/TC 216 of the European Committee for standardisation suggested that the Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine type 1 strain (LSc-2ab) presently used for virucidal tests should be replaced by another attenuated vaccine poliovirus type 1 strain, CHAT. Both strains were historically used as oral vaccines, but the Sabin type 1 strain was acknowledged to be more attenuated. In Germany, vaccination against poliomyelitis was introduced in 1962 using the oral polio vaccine (OPV) containing Sabin strain LSc-2ab. The vaccination schedule was changed from OPV to an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) containing wild polio virus type 1 strain Mahoney in 1998. In the present study, we assessed potential differences in neutralising antibody titres to Sabin and CHAT in persons with a history of either OPV, IPV, or OPV with IPV booster. Neutralisation poliovirus antibodies against CHAT and Sabin 1 were measured in sera of 41 adults vaccinated with OPV. Additionally, sera from 28 children less than 10 years of age and immunised with IPV only were analysed. The neutralisation assay against poliovirus was performed according to WHO guidelines. The neutralisation activity against CHAT in adults with OPV vaccination history was significantly lower than against Sabin poliovirus type 1 strains (Wilcoxon signed-rank test P < 0.025). In eight sera, the antibody titres measured against CHAT were less than 8, although the titre against Sabin 1 varied between 8 and 64. Following IPV booster, anti-CHAT antibodies increased rapidly in sera of CHAT-negative adults with OPV history. Sera from children with IPV history neutralised CHAT and Sabin 1 strains equally. The lack of neutralising antibodies against the CHAT strain in persons vaccinated with OPV might be associated with an increased risk of reinfection with the CHAT polio virus type 1, and this implies a putative risk of transmission of the virus to polio-free communities. We strongly suggest that laboratory workers who were immunised with OPV receive a booster vaccination with IPV before handling CHAT in the laboratory.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 12/2010; 10:347. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-10-347 · 2.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is a cause of seasonal epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease, and of less common but severe neurological manifestations. Uncertainty persists regarding the circulation of virus populations in several geographical areas and the timescale of their dissemination. We determined EV-71 sequences at loci 1D (VP1 capsid protein) and 3CD (non-structural proteins) in 86 strains recovered in Austria, France and Germany and performed an evolutionary genetic study of extant virus populations. Phylogenetic analyses positioned 78 of the 86 sequences within two clades among subgenogroups C1 and C2. A minor sequence cluster was assigned to subgenogroup C4. Analyses incorporating the available sequences estimated the substitution rate in genogroup C at 3.66 x 10(-3) and 4.46 x 10(-3) substitutions per site year(-1) for loci 1D and 3CD, respectively, assuming a relaxed molecular-clock model for sequence evolution. Most of the 'European' strains belonged to clades C1b and C2b, which originated in 1994 [95 % confidence interval (CI), 1992.7-1995.8] and 2002 (95 % CI, 2001.6-2003.8), respectively. Estimates of divergence times for locus 3CD were consistent with those measured for locus 1D. Intertwining between clades representing EV-71 subgenogroups and clades corresponding to other enterovirus types (notably early coxsackievirus A prototype strains) in the 3CD phylogeny is highly indicative of ancestral recombination events. Incongruent phylogenetic patterns estimated for loci 1D and 3CD show that a single tree cannot model the epidemic history of circulating EV-71 populations. The evolutionary timescale of genogroup C estimated for both loci was measured only in decades, indicating recent dissemination.
    Journal of General Virology 09/2010; 91(Pt 9):2263-77. DOI:10.1099/vir.0.021741-0 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: To understand immunological responses in chimpanzees vaccinated with live-attenuated vaccine (oral polio vaccine; OPV), serum neutralizing antibodies against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were investigated over time. Methods: The neutralizing antibody titers against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were determined by microneutralization test using 100 ID50 of poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 (Sabin strains). Results: Neutralizing antibodies against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were detected in 85.7%, 71.4%, and 65% of the serum from 42 chimpanzees tested 9 years post-vaccination. The neutralizing antibody titers in chimpanzees were similar to the documented levels in human studies as an indicator of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions: This study reveals persistence of neutralizing antibodies in chimpanzees for at least 9 years after vaccination with OPV. This first study in chimpanzees provides useful information for the evaluation of the success of vaccination with OPV in other captive apes.
    Journal of Medical Primatology 04/2010; 39(2). DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0684.2010.00400.x · 0.89 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Norovirus is often transmitted from person-to-person. Transmission may also be food-borne, but only few norovirus outbreak investigations have identified food items as likely vehicles of norovirus transmission through an analytical epidemiological study.During 7-9 January, 2009, 36 persons at a military base in Germany fell ill with acute gastroenteritis. Food from the military base's canteen was suspected as vehicle of infection, norovirus as the pathogen causing the illnesses. An investigation was initiated to describe the outbreak's extent, to verify the pathogen, and to identify modes of transmission and source of infection to prevent further cases. For descriptive analysis, ill persons were defined as members of the military base with acute onset of diarrhoea or vomiting between 24 December 2008, and 3 February 2009, without detection of a pathogen other than norovirus in stools. We conducted a retrospective cohort study within the headquarters company. Cases were military base members with onset of diarrhoea or vomiting during 5-9 January. We collected information on demographics, food items eaten at the canteen and contact to ill persons or vomit, using a self-administered questionnaire. We compared attack rates (AR) in exposed and unexposed persons, using bivariable and multivariable logistic regression modelling. Stool specimens of ill persons and canteen employees, canteen food served during 5-7 January and environmental swabs were investigated by laboratory analysis. Overall, 101/815 (AR 12.4%) persons fell ill between 24 December 2008 and 3 February 2009. None were canteen employees. Most persons (n = 49) had disease onset during 7-9 January. Ill persons were a median of 22 years old, 92.9% were male. The response for the cohort study was 178/274 (72.1%). Of 27 cases (AR 15.2%), 25 had eaten at the canteen and 21 had consumed salad. Salad consumption on 6 January (aOR: 8.1; 95%CI: 1.5-45.4) and 7 January (aOR: 15.7; 95%CI: 2.2-74.1) were independently associated with increased risk of disease.Norovirus was detected in 8/28 ill persons' and 4/25 canteen employees' stools, 6/55 environmental swabs and 0/33 food items. Sequences were identical in environmental and stool samples (subtype II.4 2006b), except for those of canteen employees. Control measures comprised cohort isolation of symptomatic persons, exclusion of norovirus-positive canteen employees from work and disinfection of the canteen's kitchen. Our investigation indicated that consumption of norovirus-contaminated salad caused the peak of the outbreak on 7-9 January. Strict personal hygiene and proper disinfection of environmental surfaces remain crucial to prevent norovirus transmission.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 02/2010; 10:30. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-10-30 · 2.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The first European rotavirus surveillance network, EuroRotaNet, comprising 16 laboratories in 15 European countries, has been established. Fecal samples from gastroenteritis cases positive for group A rotavirus antigen were collected from multiple European countries from 2005 to mid-2008 and were subjected to G and P genotyping. Epidemiological data collected included age, sex, geographical location, setting, dates of onset and sample collection, and clinical symptoms. A total of 8879 rotavirus-positive samples were characterized: 2129 cases were from the 2005-2006 season, 4030 from the 2006-2007 season, and 2720 from the ongoing 2007-2008 season. A total of 30 different G and P type combinations of strains circulated in the region from 2005 through 2008. Of these strains, 90% had genotypes commonly associated with human infections-G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]-and 1.37% represented potential zoonotic introductions. G1P[8] remained the most prevalent genotype in Europe as a whole, but the incidence of infection with G1P[8] rotavirus strains was <50% overall, and all 3 seasons were characterized by a significant diversity of cocirculating strains. The peak incidence of rotavirus infection occurred from January through May, and 81% of case patients were aged <2.5 years. Conclusions. Data gathered through EuroRotaNet will provide valuable background information on the rotavirus strain diversity in Europe before the introduction of rotavirus vaccines, and the network will provide a robust method for surveillance during vaccine implementation.
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases 11/2009; 200 Suppl 1(s1):S215-21. DOI:10.1086/605049 · 5.78 Impact Factor
  • Sabine Diedrich, Anna Weinbrecht, Eckart Schreier
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a significant pathogen with potential to cause large outbreaks. Because little is known about its seroprevalence and molecular epidemiology in Germany, data for 1997-2007 are presented. Four hundred thirty-six sera from persons aging 10 months to 75 years were tested in a neutralisation test; 63.4% of pre-school children were seronegative, whereas about 75% of adults had antibodies to EV71. Phylogenetic analysis of 28 isolates associated with neurological or cutaneous manifestations showed that isolates belonging to genogroup C1 predominated in 2000-2005, followed by a change to genogroup C2 in 2006 and 2007. This shows the importance of monitoring the diversity of one of the most relevant neurotropic enteroviruses.
    Archives of Virology 07/2009; 154(7):1139-42. DOI:10.1007/s00705-009-0413-x · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • Das Gesundheitswesen 03/2009; 71(03). DOI:10.1055/s-0029-1215510 · 0.62 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: The first European rotavirus surveillance network, EuroRotaNet, comprising 16 laboratories in 15 European countries, has been established. Methods: Fecal samples from gastroenteritis cases positive for group A rotavirus antigen were collected from multiple European countries from 2005 to mid‐2008 and were subjected to G and P genotyping. Epidemiological data collected included age, sex, geographical location, setting, dates of onset and sample collection, and clinical symptoms. Results: A total of 8879 rotavirus‐positive samples were characterized: 2129 cases were from the 2005–2006 season, 4030 from the 2006–2007 season, and 2720 from the ongoing 2007–2008 season. A total of 30 different G and P type combinations of strains circulated in the region from 2005 through 2008. Of these strains, 90% had genotypes commonly associated with human infections—G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[8], and G9P[8]—and 1.37% represented potential zoonotic introductions. G1P[8] remained the most prevalent genotype in Europe as a whole, but the incidence of infection with G1P[8] rotavirus strains was <50% overall, and all 3 seasons were characterized by a significant diversity of cocirculating strains. The peak incidence of rotavirus infection occurred from January through May, and 81% of case patients were aged <2.5 years. Conclusions: Data gathered through EuroRotaNet will provide valuable background information on the rotavirus strain diversity in Europe before the introduction of rotavirus vaccines, and the network will provide a robust method for surveillance during vaccine implementation.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: From 2001 to 2004, Switzerland switched from routine vaccination with oral polio vaccine (OPV) to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), using both vaccines in the intervening period. Since IPV is less effective at inducing mucosal immunity than OPV, this change might allow imported poliovirus to circulate undetected more easily in an increasingly IPV-immunized population. Environmental monitoring is a recognized tool for identifying polioviruses in a community. To look for evidence of poliovirus circulation following cessation of OPV use, two sewage treatment plants located in the Zurich area were sampled from 2004 to 2006. Following virus isolation using either RD or L20B cells, enteroviruses and polioviruses were identified by reverse transcription-PCR. A total of 20 out of 174 wastewater samples were positive for 62 Sabin-like isolates. One isolate from each poliovirus-positive sample was analyzed in more detail. Sequencing the complete viral protein 1 (VP1) capsid coding region, as well as intratypic differentiation (ITD), identified 3 Sabin type 1, 13 Sabin type 2, and 4 Sabin type 3 strains. One serotype 1 strain showed a discordant result in the ITD. Three-quarters of the strains showed mutations within the 5' untranslated region and VP1, known to be associated with reversion to virulence. Moreover, three strains showed heterotypic recombination (S2/S1 and S3/S2/S3). The low number of synonymous mutations and the partial temperature sensitivity are not consistent with extended circulation of these Sabin virus strains. Nevertheless, the continuous introduction of polioviruses into the community emphasizes the necessity for uninterrupted child vaccination to maintain high herd immunity.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 09/2008; 74(18):5608-14. DOI:10.1128/AEM.02764-07 · 3.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Human enteroviruses (HEV) are considered as one of the major causes of central nervous system infections in pediatrics. They are currently classified into five species involving more than 60 officially recognized serotypes. This study describes a rapid molecular method, based on pyrosequencing of a VP1 fragment, for the identification of enterovirus serotypes. In order to do so, 200 isolates and clinical specimens that were first grouped into 62 different HEV serotypes using neutralization test, were analyzed by pyrosequencing. All serotypes were identified using the proposed method. Most of the isolates previously untypeable by classical procedures, as well as mixed enterovirus infections containing viruses belonging to different species, could also be determined using pyrosequencing. The present results give support to pyrosequencing as an efficient method of HEV genotyping.
    Journal of Virological Methods 04/2008; 148(1-2):260-4. DOI:10.1016/j.jviromet.2007.10.008 · 1.88 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

650 Citations
87.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2014
    • Robert Koch Institut
      • Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 2008
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • Division of Viral Diseases
      Atlanta, Michigan, United States
  • 2007
    • Public Health England
      • Virus Reference Department (VRD)
      London, ENG, United Kingdom