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Publications (7)8.31 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Male breast carcinoma is a rare neoplasm, accounting for fewer than 1% of all malignancies of the breast. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented at our institution with a lump in his left breast. Histologically, the tumour had marked nuclear pleomorphism and contained multinucleated giant cells. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the tumour cells were positive for cytokeratin AE1/AE3, E-cadherin, p53, Ki-67, cyclin D1, estrogen and progesterone receptor proteins, but negative for c-ERB-B2 and CD68. Based on the latest World Health Organization classification, the tumour was diagnosed as pleomorphic ductal carcinoma of the breast. To the Authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of pleomorphic carcinoma of male breast.
    Anticancer research 09/2011; 31(9):3069-71. · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A histological variant of gastric adenocarcinoma, characterized by an intense tumor-associated tissue eosinophilia (TATE), has been occasionally reported in the literature. The purpose of this ultrastructural study was to determine the interactions between frequently occurring eosinophils and tumor cells in gastric carcinoma characterized by TATE. Fresh tumor tissue of 92 gastric carcinomas was processed for both light and electron microscopic examination. Intense TATE was found in 7 out of 92 (7.6%) gastric carcinomas (6 of intestinal-type and 1 of diffuse-type). Electron microscopy, selectively performed in 7 cases with intense TATE, revealed eosinophils, singly or in groups, in contact with damaged or necrotic tumor cells. Activated eosinophils showing piecemeal degranulation were also found in intimate contact with viable tumor cells, characterized by plasma membrane caveolar invaginations. The authors regard this close morphological relationship as in vivo evidence for possible cross-talk between eosinophil and viable tumor cell, a conclusion that has already been drawn from experimental studies, but until now inadequately supported by ultrastructural observations in a human tumor.
    Ultrastructural Pathology 06/2011; 35(4):145-9. · 0.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mitotic catastrophe is a common phenomenon occurring in tumor cells with impaired p53 function exposed to various cytotoxic and genotoxic agents. The defective p53 checkpoint causes improper segregation of chromosomes, resulting in aberrant mitosis, multiple micronuclei, multinucleate giant cells, and eventual necrosis-like death and centrosome aberration. Although various descriptions explaining mitotic catastrophe exist, there is still no generally accepted definition of this phenomenon. However, the syndrome of mitotic catastrophe may be a unifying morphological concept of particular interest to cancer research, as it integrally links cell death to checkpoints of the cell cycle. Morphological findings compatible with mitotic catastrophe may be found in pleomorphic, giant cell carcinomas--neoplasms characterized by a poor prognosis. The inclusion of mitotic catastrophe as part of the microscopic evaluation of tumors will add further insight to the pathobiology of tumor progression and in novel therapeutic designs. Finally, the possibility of assimilating mitotic catastrophe into a prognostic score is discussed.
    Ultrastructural Pathology 04/2011; 35(2):66-71. · 0.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: TNM post-surgical staging is considered to be one of the most powerful prognosticators for colorectal carcinoma. Although patient survival mostly decreases concomitantly to stage increase, in a percentage of cases TNM stage appears only to express the anatomic extent of the neoplasia with no correlation with clinical outcome. Thus, the identification of additional prognostic markers for colorectal cancer is required. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a 25-kDa protein that appears to play an important role in colorectal cancer progression. In order to evaluate whether NGAL expression may be considered as a predictor of colorectal cancer progression, we analyzed its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics, as well as with patient progression-free survival in a series of surgically resected colorectal carcinomas. A variable NGAL immunoexpression was found in 24 out of the 64 analyzed cases. When only the positive cases were considered, a significant association was found between a high NGAL expression and the presence of distant metastases or high tumor stage. In addition, the presence of NGAL was a significant negative prognostic marker correlated with a shorter progression-free survival in stage I colorectal carcinoma, but not in the remaining TNM stages. If our findings are confirmed in more extensive analyses on stage I colorectal carcinoma, NGAL assessment may be used in order to select those patients with a higher progression risk and to submit them to adjuvant therapies useful to prevent adverse outcome.
    Oncology letters 11/2010; 1(6):1089-1096. · 0.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors report a case of a 70-year-old woman with an anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma, along with immunohistochemical and electron microscopic findings. Histologically, the tumor is characterized by mononucleated and multinucleated giant cells, lack of architectural cohesion, atypical mitoses, and extensive areas of coagulative necrosis. Tumor cells showed AE1/AE3 positivity as well as nuclear overexpression of p53 and ki-67. Semithin sections revealed multiple nuclei with heterogeneous size ranging from micronuclei to large-size (giant) nuclei. Micronuclei were confirmed by electron microscopy that disclosed also the presence of nuclear blebs, strings, and pockets. Morphological findings of these abnormal nuclear structures in conjunction with p53 and Ki-67 nuclear overexpression suggested a faulty mitotic checkpoint/mitotic catastrophe in the progression of anaplastic giant cell thyroid carcinoma.
    Ultrastructural Pathology 10/2010; 35(1):14-8. · 0.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of TLR4 and NOD2/CARD15 genes in gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated the allelic frequencies of TLR4 (D299G and T399I) and NOD2/CARD15 (R702W, G908R, and L1007finsC) SNPs in 87 asymptomatic serologically H. pylori-positive individuals (Group I), in 63 patients with antrum-predominant gastritis (Group II) and in 60 patients with corpus-predominant gastritis or pangastritis (Group III). There was significant difference in allelic frequencies of TLR4 D299G SNP in Group II (p=0.02; OR 2.97) as well as in Group III (p=0.001; OR 4.80). Significant difference of T399I SNP allele frequency was only found in Group III (p=0.009; OR 3.73). The allele frequencies of NOD2/CARD15 G908R and of L1007insC SNP were higher in Group III (p=0.003, OR 5.18; p=0.03; OR 3.66, respectively). TLR4 and NOD2/CARD15 genes are associated with high risk Group III patients and, therefore, they appear to play a role in gastric carcinogenesis.
    Anticancer research 02/2010; 30(2):513-7. · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Various nuclear envelope derivatives, such as the annulate lamellae, the intranuclear tubules as well as the nuclear projections and pockets may be observed electron microscopically in tumour cells. In a series of eight gastric adenocarcinomas, ultrastructural features of nuclear envelope changes were analyzed and correlated to the biology of the tumours. Histologically, three tumours were intestinal-type adenocarcinomas and showed annulate lamellae in the cytoplasm of some tumor cells. Five tumors were mixed-type adenocarcinomas, with a solid growth pattern; two of these tumours were characterized by the presence of intranuclear tubules, whereas the remaining three tumours exhibited nuclear pockets and projections. Seven out of eight patients died due to metastatic disease during the follow-up period (median 31 months). Ultrastructural evaluation of pleomorphism of the nuclear envelope may be an ancillary method for the pathologist in the study of nuclear grading of gastric carcinomas.
    Anticancer research 02/2010; 30(2):699-702. · 1.71 Impact Factor