Rob Menzies

National Centre for Immunisation Research & Surveillance, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Are you Rob Menzies?

Claim your profile

Publications (10)3.49 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This, the fourth annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2010 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) data. These include coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). For the first time, coverage from other sources for adolescents and the elderly are included. The proportion of children 'fully vaccinated' at 12, 24 and 60 months of age was 91.6%, 92.1% and 89.1% respectively. For vaccines available on the NIP but not currently assessed for 'fully immunised' status or for eligibility for incentive payments (rotavirus and pneumococcal at 12 months and meningococcal C and varicella at 24 months) coverage varied. Although pneumococcal vaccine had similar coverage at 12 months to other vaccines, coverage was lower for rotavirus at 12 months (84.7%) and varicella at 24 months (83.0%). Overall coverage at 24 months of age exceeded that at 12 months of age nationally and for most jurisdictions, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations, this represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. The 'fully immunised' coverage estimates for immunisations due by 60 months increased substantially in 2009, reaching almost 90% in 2010, probably related to completed immunisation by 60 months of age being introduced in 2009 as a requirement for GP incentive payments. As previously documented, vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) had suboptimal coverage at around 57%. Delayed receipt of vaccines by Indigenous children at the 60-month milestone age improved from 56% to 62% but the disparity in on-time vaccination between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children at earlier age milestones did not improve. Coverage data for human papillomavirus (HPV)from the national HPV register are consistent with high coverage in the school-based program (73%) but were lower for the catch-up program for women outside school (30-38%). Coverage estimates for vaccines on the NIP from 65 years of age were comparable with other developed countries.
    Communicable diseases intelligence quarterly report. 01/2013; 37(1):E21-39.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for 2010, and describes reporting trends over the 11-year period 2000 to 2010. There were 3,894 AEFI records for vaccines administered in 2010, the highest number reported in any year, and a 63% increase over the 2,396 in 2009. The increase was almost entirely attributable to the large number of reports following seasonal influenza (n = 2,354) and pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza vaccines (n = 514). In children < 7 years of age, the number of reports following influenza vaccine increased almost 100-fold from 17 in 2009 to 1,693 in 2010 and, for people aged > or =18 years, from 135 to 496. For seasonal influenza vaccine, a disproportionate number of reports were from Western Australia (34%), consistent with more widespread influenza vaccination of children in that state, and 79% were identified as being associated with Fluvax or Fluvax junior (CSL Biotherapies). For pH1N1 vaccine, the number of reports in children < 7 years of age increased from 23 in 2009 to 329 in 2010, but was available for this age group for only 1 month (December) in 2009. In those aged > or = 18 years, for whom the pH1N1 vaccine was available from late September 2009, pH1N1 vaccine reports decreased from 1,209 in 2009 to 109 in 2010. For influenza vaccines, 79% of reports included fever, 45% allergic reactions and 15% malaise. In children aged < 7 years, there were 169 reports of convulsions (127 febrile), compared with 19 in 2009. In contrast, for non-influenza vaccines, reporting rates in children < 7 years of age increased only marginally from 14.1 per 100,000 in 2009 to 19.3 per 100,000 in 2010. Four deaths temporally associated with immunisation were reported but none were considered to have a causal association.
    Communicable diseases intelligence 12/2011; 35(4):263-80.
  • Source
    Communicable diseases intelligence 03/2011; 35(1):21-8.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This, the 2nd annual immunisation coverage report, documents trends during 2008 for a range of standard measures derived from Australian Childhood Immunisation Register data, including overall coverage at standard age milestones and for individual vaccines included on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Coverage by indigenous status and mapping by smaller geographic areas as well as trends in timeliness are also summarised according to standard templates. With respect to overall coverage, Immunise Australia Program targets have been reached for children at 12 and 24 months of age but not for children at 5 years of age. Coverage at 24 months of age exceeds that at 12 months of age, but as receipt of varicella vaccine at 18 months is excluded from calculations of 'fully immunised' this probably represents delayed immunisation, with some contribution from immunisation incentives. Similarly, the decrease in coverage estimates for immunisations due at 4 years of age from March 2008, is primarily due to changing the assessment age from 6 years to 5 years of age from December 2007. A number of individual vaccines on the NIP are not currently assessed for 'fully immunised' status or for eligibility for incentive payments. These include pneumococcal conjugate and meningococcal C conjugate vaccines for which coverage is comparable to vaccines which are assessed for 'fully immunised' status, and rotavirus and varicella vaccines for which coverage is lower. Coverage is also suboptimal for vaccines recommended for Indigenous children only (i.e. hepatitis A and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) as previously reported for other vaccines for both children and adults. Delayed receipt of vaccines is an important issue for vaccines recommended for Indigenous children and has not improved among non-Indigenous children despite improvements in coverage at the 24-month milestone. Although Indigenous children in Australia have coverage levels that are similar to non-indigenous children at 24 months of age, the disparity in delayed vaccination between Indigenous and non-indigenous children, which is up to 18% for the 3rd dose of DTP, remains a challenge.
    Communicable diseases intelligence 09/2010; 34(3):241-58.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for 2009, and describes reporting trends over the 10-year period 2000 to 2009. There were 2,396 AEFI records for vaccines administered in 2009, the highest number reported, a 46% increase over the 1,638 in 2008. The increase was almost entirely due to reports related to the introduction of pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) 2009 influenza vaccine from September 2009 (n = 1,312) largely from the members of the public. The pH1N1 AEFI reporting rate for people aged > or = 18 years was 34.2 per 100,000 administered doses compared with 2.8 for seasonal influenza vaccine. The rates in > or = 65 year-olds were 28.0, 1.6 and 13.3 for pH1N1, seasonal influenza and polysaccharide pneumococcal, respectively. The high reporting rate for pH1N1 vaccine is likely to be at least partly due to enhanced reporting seen for all new vaccines and greater levels of reporting from members of the public in response to the implementation of strategies to encourage reporting, as part of the pH1N1 program. For children < 7 years, AEFI reporting rates in 2009 (14.1 per 100,000 administered doses) were similar to previous years. There were 193 (8%) AEFI reports classified as serious; 6 deaths temporally associated with immunisation were reported but none were judged to have a causal association. As in previous years, the most commonly reported reactions were allergic reaction, injection site reaction, fever, headache, malaise, nausea and myalgia. The most commonly reported reactions following pH1N1 influenza vaccine were allergic reaction (n = 381), headache (n = 289), fever (n = 235), pain (n = 186), nausea (n = 180) and injection site reaction (n = 178). The data within the limitation of passive surveillance provide a reference point for ongoing reporting of trends in AEFI by age group, severity and vaccine type and illustrate the value of the national TGA database as a surveillance tool for monitoring AEFI nationally.
    Communicable diseases intelligence 09/2010; 34(3):259-76.
  • Communicable diseases intelligence 03/2010; 34(1):49-53.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This report summarises Australian passive surveillance data for adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for 2008, and describes reporting trends over the 9-year period 2000 to 2008. There were 1,542 AEFI records for vaccines administered in 2008. This was an annual AEFI reporting rate of 7.2 per 100,000 population, a 5% decrease compared with 2007. The majority of AEFI reports described non-serious events while 10% (n = 152) were classified as serious. Two deaths temporally associated with immunisation were reported; there was no evidence to suggest a causal association. The most commonly reported reactions were injection site reaction, allergic reaction, fever and headache. AEFI reporting rates in 2008 were 2.7 events per 100,000 administered doses of influenza vaccine for adults aged > or = 18 years, 18.9 per 100,000 administered doses of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for those aged > or = 65 years, and 17.2 per 100,000 administered doses of scheduled vaccines for children aged < 7 years. Reports for infants increased in 2008, mainly related to gastrointestinal system events temporally associated with receipt of rotavirus vaccine in the 1st full year of the rotavirus immunisation program, while there was a substantial decrease in AEFI reports for human papilIoma virus vaccine in adolescents compared with 2007 when the program commenced. Increases in reports in children and adults were also partly attributed to the implementation of enhanced passive surveillance in Victoria. The consistently low reporting rate of serious AEFI highlights the safety of vaccines in Australia and illustrates the value of the national TGA database as a surveillance tool for monitoring AEFIs nationally.
    Communicable diseases intelligence 12/2009; 33(4):365-81.
  • Source
    Communicable diseases intelligence 06/2009; 33(2):170-87.
  • Vaccine 11/2007; 25(42):7281-4. · 3.49 Impact Factor
  • Rob Menzies, Han Wang, Peter McIntyre
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pertussis, or whooping cough, notifications, and deaths declined dramatically after the introduction of mass vaccination in the 1950s, to the extent that many states stopped collecting notifications. However, since 1990, notification rates have increased noticeably from the record low levels seen in the 1970s and 1980s in all Australian states and territories, including NSW. A number of factors, other than a true increase in the underlying incidence of pertussis, may account for this.
    New South Wales Public Health Bulletin 01/2003; 14(4-5):71-6.

Publication Stats

83 Citations
3.49 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • National Centre for Immunisation Research & Surveillance
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2007–2011
    • Children's Hospital at Westmead
      • National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2003–2010
    • University of Sydney
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia