Ravi J Chokshi

The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States

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Publications (10)30.31 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is often utilized for patients with inoperable neuroendocrine carcinoma liver metastases. Often, metastatic disease is not limited to the liver. The impact of extrahepatic disease (EHD) on outcomes and response after TACE has not been described. METHODS: We reviewed 192 patients who underwent TACE for large hepatic tumor burden, progression of liver metastases, or poorly controlled carcinoid syndrome due to neuroendocrine carcinoma. Demographics, clinicopathologic characteristics, response to TACE, complications, and survival were compared between patients with (n = 123) and without (n = 69) EHD. RESULTS: Demographics, histopathologic characteristics, and complications were similar between groups. As well, those with and without EHD had similar biochemical (85 vs. 88 %) and radiographic response (76 vs. 79 %) to TACE (all p = NS); however, symptomatic responses were improved in those with EHD (79 vs. 60 %, p = 0.01). The group without EHD had better overall survival compared to those with EHD disease at the time of TACE (median 62 vs. 28 months, p = 0.001). DISCUSSION: Although patients with EHD from neuroendocrine carcinoma experience shorter overall survival after TACE compared to those without EHD, they had similar symptomatic, biochemical, and radiographic response to TACE. Meaningful response to TACE is still possible in the presence of EHD and should be considered, particularly in those with carcinoid syndrome.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 03/2013; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Total pelvic exenteration (TPE) is reserved for patients with locally invasive and recurrent pelvic malignancies. Complications such as wound infections, dehiscence, hernias, abscesses, and fistulas are common after this procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether tissue transfer to the pelvis after TPE decreases wound complications. METHODS: Fifty-three patients who underwent TPE between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed. Two groups were identified, those who underwent pelvic reconstruction with a vertical rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap (n = 17) and those who underwent primary closure (n = 36). Demographics, clinicopathologic characteristics, and outcomes were compared. RESULTS: The 2 groups were similar in demographics and histopathologic characteristics. Preoperative and surgical factors including comorbidities, nutrition, radiation, surgical times, blood loss, length of stay, and complications were similar between the groups. Of the 17 patients undergoing vertical rectus abdominus myocutaneous flap placement, complications were seen in 11 patients (65%), with most of them stemming from flap dehiscence (n = 7). CONCLUSIONS: In our study, the transfer of tissue into the pelvis did not increase surgical times, blood loss, length of stay, or wound complications.
    American journal of surgery 07/2012; · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In patients with locally advanced or recurrent pelvic malignancies, total pelvic exenteration (TPE) may be necessary for curative treatment. Despite improvements in mortality rates since TPE was first described, morbidity rates remain high due to the extensive resection and the aggressiveness of these tumors. We have studied the outcomes of TPE surgery performed at our institution. Fifty-three patients with various pelvic pathologies underwent TPE between 2004 and 2010. Patients were divided into two groups based on pathology: colorectal (n = 36) versus non-colorectal (n = 17) malignancies. Demographics, operative reports, pathology reports, periprocedural events, and outcomes were analyzed. Comparison of the two groups was performed using student's t-test and Fisher's exact test. Survival curves were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log rank test. The colorectal and non-colorectal groups were similar in demographics, operative times, length of stay, estimated blood loss, and rates of preoperative and intraoperative radiation use. Chemotherapy use was increased in the colorectal group compared with the non-colorectal group (55.6% vs. 23.5%, P = 0.04). Complication rates were similar: 86% in the colorectal group and 76% in the non-colorectal group. In the colorectal group, 27.8% of patients developed perineal abscesses, whereas no patients developed these complications in the non-colorectal group (P = 0.02). No survival difference was seen in primary versus recurrent colorectal tumors; however, within the colorectal group there was a survival advantage when comparing R0 resection to R1 and R2 resection combined. Median survival rates were 27.3 months for R0 resection and 10.7 months for R1 and R2 resection combined. The median survival was 21.4 months for the colorectal group and 6.9 months for the non-colorectal group (P = 0.002). Patients undergoing TPE for colorectal tumors have improved survival when compared with patients undergoing exenteration for pelvic malignancies of other origins. Within the colorectal group, the extent of resection demonstrated a significant survival benefit of an R0 resection compared with R1 and R2 resections. Despite TPE carrying a high morbidity rate, mortality rates have improved and careful patient selection can optimize outcomes.
    World Journal of Surgical Oncology 06/2012; 10:110. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic fistula is a significant problem for patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy with fistula rates up to 61%. Fistulas lead to substantial morbidity. The study objective was to compare radiofrequency dissector closure with traditional stump closure for distal pancreatectomy. Sixty-two patients underwent distal pancreatectomy at our institution between 2002 and 2011. Thirty-three patients had traditional stump closure compared with 29 patients who had radiofrequency closure. Fistula rates, operative times, and blood loss were compared. The control patients underwent open operation in 20 (60%) cases and laparoscopic operation in the remaining 13 (40%). Of the patients that underwent radiofrequency closure, 10 (35%) underwent open operation, and the remaining 19 (65%) patients underwent laparoscopic operation. Fistula occurred in 12 of 33 (36%) patients with traditional stump closure compared to 3 of 29 (10%) patients with radiofrequency closure (p<0.02). Operative time (307 vs. 231 min [p<0.002]) and blood loss (364-200 mL [p<0.02]) were decreased in the radiofrequency closure group. Length of stay decreased from 7.8 to 6.6 days; however, this was not statistically significant. The use of radiofrequency dissector in distal pancreatectomy is effective with low rates of fistula formation. Radiofrequency closure should be studied further in prospective trials.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery 12/2011; 16(3):524-8. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to describe in detail the technique of total pelvic exenteration. Total pelvic exenteration (TPE) was first described in 1948 by Brunschwig. Since its description, complications of the procedure and surgical innovations have changed the approach to this radical surgery. We have described our institutional approach and outcomes of TPE. Fifty-four patients underwent TPE between 2004 and 2010 by the Division of Surgical Oncology at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Fifty-three patients have complete medical records available for review. Outcomes are described and have shaped these techniques. Patients were divided into various groups based on their histology: colorectal (n = 36), gynecologic (n = 6), urologic (n = 5), squamous cell (n = 2), sarcomatous disease (n = 3), and severe infections (n = 1). These were divided into two groups-colorectal (n = 36) and noncolorectal (n = 17)-for analysis. Demographics, operative time, length of stay, and complication rates were similar between the two groups. The median survival was 21.4 months for the colorectal group and 6.9 months for the noncolorectal group. Total pelvic exenteration for colorectal tumors has improved survival when compared with patients undergoing exenteration for pelvic malignancies of other origins. Total pelvic exenteration continues to be associated with high morbidity; however, with appropriate patient selection and proper operative technique, a perioperative mortality of 0 per cent can be achieved.
    The American surgeon 12/2011; 77(12):1629-39. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare outcomes and feasibility of double-barreled wet colostomy and ileal conduit (IC) in patients undergoing total pelvic exenteration (TPE). Between 2004 and 2010, 54 patients underwent TPE for pelvic malignancies. Of those patients, 53 had complete records available for analysis. Two groups were identified based on the technique used for urinary diversion, either by way of an IC or a double-barreled wet colostomy (DBWC). Demographics, comorbidities, complications, length of stay, operative times, morbidity, and mortality were compared between the 2 groups. Forty-three patients (81%) underwent a DBWC and ten patients (19%) underwent an IC. The 2 groups were similar in terms of age, gender, and comorbidities. Eighteen patients underwent an R0 resection (39%) and twenty-eight (61%) patients had a non-R0 resection. Seven patients (13%) had a complete response to therapy with no evidence of malignancy. A majority of the patients (68%) undergoing TPE had colorectal histology. Thirty-day morbidity directly related to complications of urinary or fecal diversion was 78% in the DBWC group and 58% in the IC group. There was no perioperative mortality in either group. DBWC is a safe and feasible alternative to the traditional IC for urinary diversion. This technique is easy to learn and is associated with similar operative times, length of stay, morbidity, and mortality compared with IC.
    Urology 08/2011; 78(4):856-62. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gastric bypass surgery is a highly effective therapy for long-term weight loss in severely obese patients, but carries significant perioperative risks including infection, wound dehiscence, and leaks from staple breakdown. Iron status can affect immune function and wound healing, thus may influence peri-operative complications. Common mutations in the HFE gene, the gene responsible for the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis, may impact iron status. We analyzed 1064 extremely obese Caucasian individuals who underwent open and laparoscopic Roux-n-Y gastric bypass surgery at the Geisinger Clinic. Serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and iron binding capacity were measured pre-operatively. All patients had intra-operative liver biopsies and were genotyped for the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Associations between surgical complications and serum iron measures, HFE gene status, and liver iron histology were determined. We found that increased serum iron and transferrin saturation were present in patients with any post-operative complication, and that increased serum ferritin was also increased in patients with major complications. Increased serum transferrin saturation was also associated with wound complications in open RYGB, and transferrin saturation and ferritin with prolonged lengths of stay. The presence of 2 or more HFE mutations was associated with overall complications as well as wound complications in open RYGB. No differences were found in complication rates between those with stainable liver iron and those without. Serum iron status and HFE genotype may be associated with complications following RYGB surgery in the extremely obese.
    Patient Safety in Surgery 01/2011; 5(1):1.
  • Gastroenterology 01/2010; 138(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    Ravi J Chokshi, S Abdel-Misih, Mark Bloomston
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    ABSTRACT: Colon cancer management continues to evolve with significant advances in chemotherapy, surgical technique and palliative interventions. As the options of therapy have improved, so have the challenges of management of primary colon cancer. A review of historical and up to date literature was undertaken utilising Medline/PubMed to examine relevant topics of interest-related to the surgical management. Enhanced knowledge of genetics associated with colon cancer has improved our care of patients with hereditary colon cancer syndromes. Additionally, traditional approaches to surgical intervention for primary colon cancer have been questioned and will be discussed in this review including the role of laparoscopy, use of mechanical bowel preparation, management of the primary tumour in the face of metastatic disease, as well as the role of palliative intervention in select patients. Colon cancer has seen improvement and expansion of therapeutic approaches to primary colon cancer. Laparoscopy and palliative interventions have become widely accepted with level I evidence to demonstrate good patient outcomes. Traditional dogma with mechanical bowel preparation has been challenged and debunked with regards to the efficacious benefits previously accepted. The management of the primary tumour has now become increasingly complex as it appears to be a reasonable approach to manage the primary tumour non-operatively in select cases of extracolonic disease requiring management.
    Indian Journal of Surgery 12/2009; 71(6):350-5. · 0.09 Impact Factor
  • Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases 01/2009; 5(3):S16–S17. · 4.12 Impact Factor