RP Hasija

IRCCS Istituto G. Gaslini, Genova, Liguria, Italy

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Publications (19)46.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To put forward a new concept--Blau arteritis, a form of large-vessel vasculitis phenotypically related to Takayasu disease but genetically and clinically part of an expanded phenotype of Blau syndrome. We provide a clinical description of a new case and summarize previously published cases of arteritis associated with Blau syndrome. Genetic testing was performed by direct sequencing of exon 4 of the NOD2 gene. The case described and those reviewed from the literature demonstrate the emerging phenotype of Takayasu-like arteritis in patients with Blau syndrome. Although most patients described to date depict an otherwise classic Blau syndrome phenotype, the current case was atypical in that the predominant features were arteritic. A novel substitution, G464W, in a highly conserved position near the nucleotide oligomerization domain of the NOD2 protein is also described. Blau arteritis can be observed in the context of both typical and atypical (incomplete) Blau syndrome. The associated mutation in the NOD2 gene raises the question of the potential importance of this gene among patients with "primary" forms of Takayasu arteritis.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 08/2012; 39(9):1888-92. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the American College of Rheumatology paediatric (ACRp) response criteria and conventional radiography with MRI findings in a cohort of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. METHODS: Forty consecutive patients (30 girls, 10 boys; median age 10.8 years) with arthritis of the wrist starting treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or biological agents were recruited. At 1-year follow-up the treatment response was assessed by ACRp criteria and radiographic progression using the adapted Sharp/van der Heijde method. Wrist MRIs were evaluated using both the paediatric-MRI and the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI scores. Sensitivity to change of clinical and imaging variables was assessed by standardised response mean (SRM) and relative efficiency (RE) was used to compare SRMs. RESULTS: ACRp90 responders showed a significantly higher decrease in MRI synovitis score (median change -4) than non-responders (median change 0), ACRp30-50 responders (median change 0) and ACRp70 responders (median change -1) (p=0.0006, Kruskal-Wallis test). Non-responders showed significantly higher radiographic progression than ACRp90 responders (pB=0.016). The MRI synovitis score showed a greater responsiveness to change (SRM 1.69) compared with the majority of ACR core set of variables. MRI erosion scores were less responsive than conventional radiography in detecting destructive changes (RE <1). MRI follow-up revealed no signs of inflammation in four out of 24 wrists with clinically inactive disease. CONCLUSION: Only ACRp90 responders showed a significant decrease in synovitis and the halting of structural damage, suggesting that levels of response higher than ACRp30 are more appropriate for assessing drug efficacy. The excellent responsiveness of MRI and its ability to detect subclinical synovitis make it a promising outcome measure.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 07/2012; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the performance of the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS) v3 and the Disease Extent Index (DEI) for the assessment of disease activity in 4 primary childhood (c-) systemic vasculitides. Patients fulfilling the EULAR/PRINTO/PRES (Ankara) c-vasculitis classification criteria for Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), childhood (c) polyarteritis nodosa (c-PAN), c-Wegener's granulomatosis (c-WG) and c-Takayasu arteritis (c-TA) with disease duration at the time of diagnosis ≤3 months were extracted from the PRINTO database. The performance of the BVAS and DEI were examined by assessing convergent validity, the pattern of disease involvement, and responsiveness. We also evaluated alternative unweighted scoring methods for both tools. The analysis set included 796 patients with 669 HSP, 80 c-PAN, 25 c-WG and 22 c-TA. The median age at diagnosis was 6.9 years (6.6-12) and median delay in making the diagnosis from the onset of signs/symptoms was 0.01 (0.003-0.027) years. A strong correlation was found between the BVAS and DEI (rs=0.78) while correlation with the physician global assessment was moderate (rs=0.48) with BVAS and poor with DEI (rs=0.25). Both the BVAS and DEI sub-scores and total scores were able to descrive the disease involvement in the 4 childhood vasculitides. Responsiveness was large (>1.5) for both tools. The performance characteristics of the BVAS and DEI with the unweighted methods were comparable. This study demonstrates that both the BVAS and DEI are valid tools for the assessment of the level of disease activity in a large cohort of childhood acute and chronic vasculitides.
    Clinical and experimental rheumatology 01/2012; 30(1 Suppl 70):S162-8. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate response to therapy over a 24-month period in a large prospective international cohort of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM). The study included 145 patients with recent-onset juvenile DM and 130 juvenile DM patients experiencing disease flare, all of whom were <18 years old. Disease activity parameters and therapeutic approaches in 4 geographic areas were analyzed at baseline and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Response was assessed according to the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO) juvenile DM response criteria, and data were reported "as observed" and in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Patients with recent-onset juvenile DM at baseline had higher baseline disease activity and greater improvement over 24 months when compared to juvenile DM patients experiencing disease flare at baseline. Methotrexate (MTX) or high-dose corticosteroids were administered more frequently to patients with recent-onset juvenile DM, compared to juvenile DM patients experiencing disease flare, who were more likely to receive cyclosporine. Compared to patients from Western and Eastern Europe, a higher proportion of patients from South and Central America and North America received pulse steroids, and the average steroid dosage was higher in the North American and South and Central American patients. The use of MTX was similar in all 4 regions, while cyclosporin A was more frequently used in Western Europe. In the "as observed" analysis, 57.9% of the patients with recent-onset juvenile DM and 36.4% of the patients experiencing disease flare (P<0.001) reached at least a 70% response by PRINTO criteria at 6 months; these proportions had increased at month 24 to 78.4% and 51.2%, respectively (P<0.001). Corresponding results of the ITT analysis were much lower, with only one-third of the patients able to maintain the initial assigned therapy over 24 months. Patients with recent-onset juvenile DM are more likely to achieve significant clinical improvement over 24 months, when compared to patients experiencing flares of juvenile DM. Internationally, various therapeutic approaches are used to treat this disease.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 06/2011; 63(10):3142-52. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In this review we describe the general methodology and the results of the international projects, conducted by the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO), in collaboration with the Paediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG). The aim of these projects were to identify and validate criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in clinical trials and in daily clinical practice in patients with the three major paediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD): juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). METHODS: The methodological approach to identify and validate outcome measures can be divided into three main phases: (1) the development of a preliminary core set of measures to evaluate the outcome (e.g. response to therapy, remission criteria, disease activity or damage etc.) through literature review and consensus techniques; (2) a large-scale data collection for a prospectively evidence-based validation of the preliminary findings; (3) the final development of a validated criteria for the evaluation of the outcome. RESULTS: The core sets for three diseases included domains that are common to all diseases (physician's global assessment of disease activity; parent's global assessment of the overall patient's well-being; disability and/or health-related quality of life) plus additional domains that are specific for each disease. In order to be classified as a responder to a given treatment, a patient should demonstrate a different minimum level of improvement (≥30% in JIA, ≥20% in JDM, and ≥50% in JSLE) with no more than one of the remaining variables worsening by more than 30%. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed core sets and definitions of improvement incorporate clinically meaningful change in a composite endpoint for the evaluation of global response to therapy in the major PRD. The definitions are proposed for use in PRD clinical trials and may help physicians to decide if a child has responded adequately to therapy.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 05/2011; 67(suppl 1):125-31. · 2.74 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 05/2011; 2011(67 suppl1):125-31. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this review we describe the general methodology and the results of the international projects, conducted by the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO), in collaboration with the Paediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG). The aim of these projects were to identify and validate criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in clinical trials and in daily clinical practice in patients with the three major paediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD): juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE). The methodological approach to identify and validate outcome measures can be divided into three main phases: (1) the development of a preliminary core set of measures to evaluate the outcome (e.g. response to therapy, remission criteria, disease activity or damage etc.) through literature review and consensus techniques; (2) a large-scale data collection for a prospectively evidence-based validation of the preliminary findings; (3) the final development of a validated criteria for the evaluation of the outcome. The core sets for three diseases included domains that are common to all diseases (physician's global assessment of disease activity; parent's global assessment of the overall patient's well-being; disability and/or health-related quality of life) plus additional domains that are specific for each disease. In order to be classified as a responder to a given treatment, a patient should demonstrate a different minimum level of improvement (≥30% in JIA, ≥20% in JDM, and ≥50% in JSLE) with no more than one of the remaining variables worsening by more than 30%. The proposed core sets and definitions of improvement incorporate clinically meaningful change in a composite endpoint for the evaluation of global response to therapy in the major PRD. The definitions are proposed for use in PRD clinical trials and may help physicians to decide if a child has responded adequately to therapy.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 11/2010; 67 Suppl 1:125-31. · 2.74 Impact Factor
  • R P Hasija, A Nagral, S Marar, A R Bavdekar
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    ABSTRACT: We report a four year old boy who presented with liver failure secondary to anti-thrombin III deficiency related Budd Chiari syndrome. He was treated with TIPSS (transjugular intrahepatic porto systemic shunt) which reversed the encephalopathy, normalised the liver function and improved growth, pre-empting the need for a liver transplantation. This is the first reported case of TIPSS in a child with a fulminant presentation of Budd-Chiari Syndrome.
    Indian pediatrics 06/2010; 47(6):527-8. · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a four year old boy who presented with liver failure secondary to antithrombin III deficiency related Budd Chiari syndrome. He was treated with TIPSS (transjugular intrahepatic porto systemic shunt) which reversed the encephalopathy, normalised the liver function and improved growth, pre-empting the need for a liver transplantation. This is the first reported case of TIPSS in a child with a fulminant presentation of Budd-Chiari Syndrome. Key wordsBudd chiari Syndrome-Hepatic venous outflow obstruction-Transhepatic portosystemic shunt
    Indian pediatrics 01/2010; 47(6):527-528. · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • Aabha Nagral, Rachana P Hasija, Shaji Marar, Fazal Nabi
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    ABSTRACT: Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) in children is not uncommon. Published literature on therapy for this condition is scarce. We therefore attempted radiological interventions in these patients to determine their efficacy and safety. Fourteen of 16 children with a median age of 22 months diagnosed as having BCS were subjected to an inferior vena cava/hepatic venogram with the aim to establish a normal antegrade flow in at least 1 hepatic vein (HV). A normal antegrade flow in at least 1 of the HVs could be established in 11 children. Three patients had angioplasty of the HV (vein size <or=4 mm), 2 underwent HV stent placements (vein size >or=5 mm), and 6 had transjugular intrahepatic porta systemic shunt ([TIPSS] total occlusion of all 3 HVs or veno-occlusive disease). The youngest child undergoing a successful stenting was 7 months of age and the child undergoing TIPSS was 3 years of age. One patient had reversal of fulminant liver failure following a successful TIPSS. Postprocedure, 2 patients developed reversible encephalopathy and 1 had a neck hematoma. There was no procedure-related mortality. The procedure was successful in both patients with stenting (100%), 5 of the 6 patients with TIPSS (80%), and only 1 of the 4 patients (25%) with angioplasty. The median follow-up was 31 months. Radiological therapeutic intervention is feasible and safe in children with BCS. The overall results of stenting/TIPSS are better than with angioplasty; however, long-term results of these interventions need to be evaluated.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 11/2009; 50(1):74-8. · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 01/2008; 6:1-1. · 1.47 Impact Factor
  • R P Hasija, R P Khubchandani, S Shenoi
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    ABSTRACT: To study the prevalence of joint hypermobility in children from Mumbai, India and to study its association with malnutrition. In a cross-sectional field study from September '02 to February '03 in Mumbai, 829 children of the lower urban socio-economic strata, between 3 and 19 years of age were evaluated independently by two observers for hypermobility using the Beighton 9-point scoring system. A score of >or= 4/9 was considered positive. Their nutritional status was stratified using standard Indian growth charts and hypermobility was quantified in various nutritional groups. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire given to parents. Standard tests of significance (Chi square test, p<0.05-significant) were applied. 58.7% of the population studied, had a Beighton score >or= 4/9. There was a declining prevalence of joint hypermobility noted with increasing age. Near equal sex incidence was noted. A higher incidence of finger signs was noted in comparison to elbow hyperextension, knee hyperextension and hands-to-floor. 26% of the hypermobile population had musculoskeletal symptoms as compared with 17.2% of the non-hypermobile population (p<0.05). A positive Beighton score was found in 452/734 (61.5%) children with Grade 3 and 4 malnutrition in comparison to 35/95 (36.8%) children with normal nutrition or mild grades (Grade 1 and 2) of malnutrition (p<0.05). In the group with Grade 3 and 4 malnutrition, 26.1% of those hypermobile had musculoskeletal symptoms in comparison to 17.7% of their non-hypermobile counterparts (p<0.05). In our study population: 1. A high prevalence of hypermobility using Beighton's score was noted; 2. Finger signs of the Beighton score were more common than the other signs; 3. Moderate and severe malnutrition were associated with hypermobility; 4. Musculoskeletal symptoms were linked to joint hypermobility; 5. Moderate and severely malnourished hypermobile children were more likely to have musculoskeletal symptoms as compared to their non-hypermobile counterparts.
    Clinical and experimental rheumatology 01/2008; 26(1):146-50. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 9(1). · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 9(1). · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 9(1). · 1.47 Impact Factor
  • Raju P Khubchandani, Rachana P Hasija
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    ABSTRACT: The concept of paediatric rheumatology clinics is relatively new to India. With the specialty still in its formative years, referrals are still delayed and children usually present after having visited multiple facilities. Our centre, which has been one of the “early birds” in setting up a paediatric rheumatology clinic in a tertiary hospital in Mumbai, reports on the spectrum of cases seen since its inception in 2003 and thereby provides a framework for those wanting to open such centres in India or for that matter in countries where paediatric rheumatology is coming of age.
    Indian Journal of Rheumatology 7(1):7–10.
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 9(1). · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 9(1). · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Pediatric Rheumatology 9:1-2. · 1.47 Impact Factor