P J Schmidt

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Maryland, United States

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Publications (69)666.44 Total impact

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  • M J Smith, P J Schmidt, T P Su, D R Rubinow
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    ABSTRACT: Despite consistent evidence that premenstrual dysphoria (PMD) is not characterized by abnormalities in basal ovarian hormone secretion, the possibility remains that PMD is associated with an abnormality in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis. We studied HPO axis regulation in 11 women with prospectively confirmed PMD and 20 asymptomatic controls, during both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Plasma levels of the gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), were obtained before and after stimulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) (100 microg intravenously). Potential diagnostic- and menstrual cycle phase-related diferences in basal and plasma hormone levels were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. No significant differences were observed between women with PMD and controls in either basal or stimulated levels of FSH and LH. Stimulated FSH was significantly increased and stimulated LH was significantly decreased during the follicular compared with the luteal phase in both women with PMD and controls. These data are consistent with prior findings of normal basal reproductive hormone levels in women with PMD. Our data suggest the absence in women with PMD of an abnormality of dynamic ovarian function as measured by GnRH stimulation.
    Gynecological Endocrinology 01/2005; 19(6):335-43. · 1.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We compared the number and quality of life events reported by depressed perimenopausal women and a non-depressed comparison group. Additionally, we examined the effects of the presence of hot flushes on life event reports. All women were 44-55 years old, had irregular menses and elevated plasma gonadotropin levels. The Psychiatric Epidemiology Research Interview recorded both the frequency of occurrence and the desirability of life events experienced by the women during the six months prior to the interview. Depressed perimenopausal women (n=50) reported significantly more undesirable events [Student's t-test (unpaired) with Bonferroni correction, t(98)=3.9, p=0.001] but not more exit events (e.g., divorce, last child leaving home or death in family) (t(98)=0.9, p=NS) compared to the non-depressed women (n=50). There were no effects of hot flushes on these diagnostic differences. The "empty nest" syndrome does not appear to be relevant in the development of perimenopausal depression. Nevertheless, independent of the presence of hot flushes, perimenopausal depressed women are more likely to report both negative life events and diminished self esteem.
    Archives of Women s Mental Health 03/2004; 7(1):19-26. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite widespread abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS), the endocrine effects of supraphysiologic doses of these compounds remain unclear. We administered the AAS methyltestosterone (MT) to 20 normal volunteers in an in-patient setting, examined its effects on levels of pituitary-gonadal, -thyroid, and -adrenal hormones, and examined potential relationships between endocrine changes and MT-induced psychological symptoms. Subjects received MT (three days of 40 mg/day, then three days of 240 mg/day) or placebo in a fixed sequence with neither subjects nor raters aware of order. Samples were obtained at the ends of the baseline, high-dose MT and withdrawal phases. Potential relationships between hormonal changes and visual analog scale measured mood changes were examined. Significant decreases in plasma levels of gonadotropins, gonadal steroids, sex hormone binding globulin, free T3 and T4, and thyroid binding globulin (Bonferroni t, p<0.01 for each) were seen during high-dose MT; free thyroxine and TSH increased during high-dose MT, with TSH increases reaching significance during withdrawal. No significant changes in pituitary-adrenal hormones were observed. Changes in free thyroxine significantly correlated with changes in aggressiveness (anger, violent feelings, irritability) (r=0.5,p=0.02) and changes in total testosterone correlated significantly with changes in cognitive cluster symptoms (forgetfulness, distractibility) (r=0.52,p=0.02). Hormonal changes did not correlate with plasma MT levels. Acute high-dose MT administration acutely suppresses the reproductive axis and significantly impacts thyroid axis balance without a consistent effect on pituitary-adrenal hormones. Mood and behavioral effects observed during AAS use may in part reflect secondary hormonal changes.
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 04/2003; 28(3):317-31. · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An association between abnormal changes in reproductive endocrine function during the perimenopause and the onset of depression in some women has been suggested but remains controversial. We examined basal plasma hormone levels in two samples of women with well characterized, first onset depression (major or minor) during the perimenopause and matched comparison groups of asymptomatic women. Results were compared by analysis of variance. No significant diagnosis-related differences were observed in plasma hormone measures of the following: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), total (T) or free testosterone (FT), or the E2/LH ratio. We did identify significantly lower morning plasma dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated metabolite DHEA-S (but not cortisol) levels in the depressed women compared to the non-depressed comparison group. Women with hot flushes (regardless of the presence of depression) were significantly older than women without flushes, had significantly higher plasma levels of FT, LH and FSH, and had significantly lower E2/LH ratios. Women with first onset depression during the perimenopause are not distinguished from controls on the basis of basal hormone measures of ovarian estrogens, testosterone, or gonadotropins. However, perimenopause-related changes in E2 may interact with low levels of DHEA in some women to increase their vulnerability to develop depression. In contrast to perimenopause-related vasomotor symptoms, depression during the perimenopause is not associated with a simple hormone deficiency state. The relatively low levels of E2 and E1 in the depressed women may have met statistical significance in a much larger and homogenous sample.
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 12/2002; 27(8):907-20. · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies suggest that women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) differ from those without PMS in measures of personality. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of menstrual cycle phase on personality variables in women with and without PMS. The Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-Revised (PDQ-R) was administered in both the follicular and luteal phases to women with PMS (according to National Institute of Mental Health PMS Workshop Diagnostic Guidelines) (N = 40). An asymptomatic control group (N = 20) as well as a symptomatic group of women with DSM-IV-diagnosed recurrent, non-menstrual-cycle-related brief depression (N = 20) also completed the questionnaire in both phases. Only women with PMS demonstrated a significant increase in total PDQ-R score (reflecting overall personality disorder) from the follicular to the luteal phase (p < .01). Women with PMS had significantly higher total PDQ-R scores than the asymptomatic controls during both the follicular (p < .05) and luteal (p < .01) phases, whereas there was no significant difference between women with PMS and symptomatic controls during either phase. Subscale scores fit similar patterns, as did the number of women in each group meeting a cutoff score indicative of the presence of personality dysfunction. In this preliminary study, women with PMS were unique in demonstrating a menstrual cycle phase effect on PDQ-R score, while their scores in both phases were closer to symptomatic controls than asymptomatic controls. These findings suggest that personality disorder in women with PMS may have both state- and trait-related components.
    The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 05/2001; 62(5):337-42. · 5.81 Impact Factor
  • R C Daly, P J Schmidt, C A Roca, D R Rubinow
    Archives of General Psychiatry 05/2001; 58(4):403-4. · 13.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anabolic androgen steroid abuse is associated with multiple psychiatric symptoms and is a significant public health problem. The biological mechanisms underlying behavioral symptom development are poorly understood. We examined levels of monoamine metabolites, neurohormones, and neuropeptides in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 17 healthy men, at baseline and following 6 days of methyltestosterone (MT) administration (3 days of 40 mg/d, then 3 days of 240 mg/d). Subjects received MT or placebo in a fixed sequence, with neither subjects nor raters aware of the order. Potential relationships were examined between CSF measures, CSF MT levels, and behavioral changes measured on a visual analog scale. Following MT administration, levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) were significantly lower (mean +/- SD, 103.8 +/- 47 vs 122.0 +/- 50.7 pmol/mL; P<.01), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were significantly higher (mean +/- SD, 104.7 +/- 31.3 vs 86.9 +/- 23.6 pmol/mL; P<.01). No significant MT-related changes were observed in CSF levels of corticotropin, norepinephrine, cortisol, arginine vasopressin, prolactin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, beta-endorphin, and somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. Changes in CSF 5-HIAA significantly correlated with increases in "activation" symptoms (energy, sexual arousal, and diminished sleep) (r = 0.55; P =.02). No significant correlation was observed between changes in CSF and plasma MT, CSF MHPG, and behavioral symptoms. Short-term anabolic androgenic steroid use affects brain neurochemistry, increasing CSF 5-HIAA and decreasing MHPG. Changes in 5-HIAA levels caused by anabolic androgenic steroids are related to the behavioral changes we observed. In this small sample, we did not observe a significant relationship between behavioral measures and either dose of MT or CSF and plasma levels of MT.
    Archives of General Psychiatry 02/2001; 58(2):172-7. · 13.77 Impact Factor
  • C A Roca, P J Schmidt, R C Daly, D R Rubinow
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 09/2000; 284(6):693-4. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the efficacy of estrogen in the treatment of depression in perimenopausal women with and without hot flushes. Women with perimenopause-related depression were randomized in a double-blind parallel design to receive either 17beta-estradiol or placebo for 3 weeks. Subsequently, women receiving estradiol during the first 3 weeks continued receiving estradiol for an additional 3 weeks, whereas women who had received placebo crossed over to estradiol for 3 weeks. Outcome measures included standardized mood rating scales and a visual analog scale self-report instrument. Of 34 female subjects, 16 received estradiol first and 18 received placebo first. After 3 weeks of estradiol, standardized mood rating scale scores and visual analog scale symptom scores (eg, sadness, anhedonia, and social isolation) were significantly decreased compared with baseline scores (P <.01) and were significantly lower than scores in women receiving placebo (P <.01), who showed no significant improvement. Neither the presence of hot flushes nor the duration of treatment (3 weeks vs 6 weeks) influenced outcome. A full or partial therapeutic response was seen in 80% of subjects receiving estradiol and 22% of those receiving placebo. In this preliminary study estradiol replacement effectively treats perimenopausal depression independent of its salutary effects on vasomotor symptoms.
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 08/2000; 183(2):414-20. · 3.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endocrine factors are purported to play a role in the etiology of postpartum depression, but direct evidence for this role is lacking. The authors investigated the possible role of changes in gonadal steroid levels in postpartum depression by simulating two hormonal conditions related to pregnancy and parturition in euthymic women with and without a history of postpartum depression. The supraphysiologic gonadal steroid levels of pregnancy and withdrawal from these high levels to a hypogonadal state were simulated by inducing hypogonadism in euthymic women-eight with and eight without a history of postpartum depression-with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist leuprolide acetate, adding back supraphysiologic doses of estradiol and progesterone for 8 weeks, and then withdrawing both steroids under double-blind conditions. Outcome measures were daily symptom self-ratings and standardized subjective and objective cross-sectional mood rating scales. Five of the eight women with a history of postpartum depression (62.5%) and none of the eight women in the comparison group developed significant mood symptoms during the withdrawal period. Analysis of variance with repeated measures of daily and cross-sectional ratings of mood showed significant phase-by-group effects. These effects reflected significant increases in depressive symptoms in women with a history of postpartum depression but not in the comparison group after hormone withdrawal (and during the end of the hormone replacement phase), compared with baseline. The data provide direct evidence in support of the involvement of the reproductive hormones estrogen and progesterone in the development of postpartum depression in a subgroup of women. Further, they suggest that women with a history of postpartum depression are differentially sensitive to mood-destabilizing effects of gonadal steroids.
    American Journal of Psychiatry 07/2000; 157(6):924-30. · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    M J Smith, P J Schmidt, D R Rubinow
    American Journal of Psychiatry 03/2000; 157(2):307-8. · 14.72 Impact Factor
  • Biological Psychiatry - BIOL PSYCHIAT. 01/2000; 47(8).
  • Biological Psychiatry - BIOL PSYCHIAT. 01/2000; 47(8).
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether there are menstrual cycle-related effects on cortical excitability in normal women. Ovarian steroid hormones affect neurotransmission in the brain. Data from animal experiments have shown that progesterone metabolites enhance the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cortex, producing benzodiazepine-like (e.g., diazepam and lorazepam) physiologic and behavioral effects. Estradiol has excitatory effects on measures of neuronal excitability, possibly acting through the glutamate system. These effects have been difficult to detect in women using conventional techniques. However, recently, paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to detect the effects of GABAergic and glutamatergic drugs in humans. We used this method to measure the effects of the menstrual cycle in normal women. We tested 13 healthy women during the follicular (low-progesterone) and luteal (high-progesterone) phases of the menstrual cycle using paired TMS. The effect of a subthreshold conditioning pulse on the cortex was tested by measuring the response to a second suprathreshold test pulse and comparing it with the response elicited by the test pulse administered alone. Conditioning TMS produced more inhibition in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase (p = 0.01), of similar magnitude to the reported effect of benzodiazepine drugs. This study provides the first direct evidence of changes in the excitability of a cortical network with the menstrual cycle. The results also show a potential confound for studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation in populations that include menstruating women.
    Neurology 01/2000; 53(9):2069-72. · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    Biological Psychiatry - BIOL PSYCHIAT. 01/2000; 47(8).
  • Biological Psychiatry - BIOL PSYCHIAT. 01/2000; 47(8).
  • D. R. Rubinow, P. J. Schmidt, L. Zhang
    Biological Psychiatry - BIOL PSYCHIAT. 01/2000; 47(8).
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the efficacy of the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone, in the treatment of midlife-onset dysthymia. A double-blind, randomized crossover treatment study was performed as follows: 3 weeks on 90 mg dehydroepiandrosterone, 3 weeks on 450 mg dehydroepiandrosterone, and 6 weeks on placebo. Outcome measures consisted of the following. Cross-sectional self-ratings included the Beck Depression Inventory, and visual analogue symptom scales. Cross-sectional objective ratings included the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Cornell Dysthymia Scale and a cognitive test battery. Seventeen men and women aged 45 to 63 years with midlife-onset dysthymia participated in this study. Response to dehydroepiandrosterone or placebo was defined as a 50% reduction from baseline in either the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale or the Beck Depression Inventory. In 15 patients who completed the study, a robust effect of dehydroepiandrosterone on mood was observed compared with placebo. Sixty percent of the patients responded to dehydroepiandrosterone at the end of the 6-week treatment period compared with 20% on placebo. A significant response was seen after 3 weeks of treatment on 90 mg per day. The symptoms that improved most significantly were anhedonia, loss of energy, lack of motivation, emotional "numbness," sadness, inability to cope, and worry. Dehydroepiandrosterone showed no specific effects on cognitive function or sleep disturbance, although a type II error could not be ruled out. This pilot study suggests that dehydroepiandrosterone is an effective treatment for midlife-onset dysthymia.
    Biological Psychiatry 07/1999; 45(12):1533-41. · 9.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Variations of the mean annual ground surface temperature (GST) extrapolated from 7 temperature-depth profiles measured in boreholes located in a forest in the Krusne Hory Mountains, Czech Republic, were related to the elevation and the slope attitude (angle and orientation) of the surface. A two-dimensional linear fit of the GSTs to the annual sum of the total sun radiation (obtained from the slope angle and orientation) and to the elevation yields factors of 0.0040oC/(kWh m-2 year-1) and -0.0040oC/m, respectively. The last factor is close to the value of -0.0047oC/m found by i ? k (1990)> as the lapse rate of the annual soil temperature at a depth of 50 cm for the former Czechoslovakia. The GST variability due to the slope attitude amounts up to 1.1oC in the investigated data set. Three-dimensional model calculations for a hilly terrain typical for the mountainous regions of Central Europe reveal appreciable differences in distortion of the subsurface temperature field caused by considering or ignoring the investigated GST dependence on the slope attitude.
    Tectonophysics 06/1999; 306(3). · 2.68 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
666.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1989–2005
    • National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
      • Behavioral Endocrinology Branch
      Maryland, United States
  • 2004
    • National Institutes of Health
      Maryland, United States
  • 1997
    • George Washington University
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States