Patricia Zheng

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

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Publications (7)8.47 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Transplant candidate caregivers (TCCs) are an under-utilized but potentially devoted pool of advocates who themselves may be recruited to register for deceased organ donation. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare recruitment barriers to deceased donor registration efforts in TCCs and health fair attendees (HFAs). A 42-item questionnaire assessing willingness to register as an organ donor and perceptions and knowledge about organ donation was administered to 452 participants (174 in Denver, 278 in San Francisco). Logistic regression, stratified by study site, was used to assess associations between explanatory variables and willingness to register as an organ donor. In Denver, 83 % of TCCs versus 68 % of HFAs indicated a willingness to register (p = 0.03). Controlling for study group (TCC vs HFA), predictors of willingness to register were female gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.4], Caucasian race (OR 2.3), college graduate (OR 11.1), married (OR 2.4) and higher positive perception of organ donation (OR 1.2), each p < 0.05. In San Francisco, 58 % of TCCs versus 70 % of HFAs indicated a willingness to register (p = 0.03). Controlling for study group (TCC vs HFA), predictors of willingness to register were Caucasian race (OR 3.5), college graduate (OR 2.2), married (OR 1.9), higher knowledge (OR 1.6) and higher positive perception of organ donation (OR 1.2), each p < 0.05. In both locales, Caucasians were more likely to have positive perceptions about organ donation and were more willing to register. Demographic characteristics, not personal connection to a transplant candidate, explain willingness to register as an organ donor.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 02/2014; · 2.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asian American families are disproportionately affected by Hepatitis B (HBV) infection. We aimed to assess the extent of screening family members of Asian patients with known HBV infection as well as patients' knowledge of HBV disease. A cross-sectional survey of established Asian patients with HBV-infection was performed at a university liver clinic. Outcome measures included the percentage of family members whose HBV serostatus was unknown and the percentage of patients who were able to correctly identify modes of transmission. A total of 803 US-based family members were identified by 58 patients. Patients did not know the HBV serostatus of 50 % of their family members and 28 % of their immediate family members. Fifty percent of participants did not know how they had acquired HBV or stated unlikely transmission modes. Though nationwide vaccination campaigns target this underrepresented population, screening family members of Asian patients with HBV remains a challenge.
    Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health 08/2013; · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Medical students receive little exposure to organ donation and procurement programs. To describe a student-run elective and its effect on participants' knowledge about and attitudes toward organ donation. Preclinical students interacted directly with donor families, organ recipients, and donation representatives; many participated in an organ procurement with the surgical team. Between 2005 and 2007, 13 students who participated in the elective and a procurement were compared with 72 students who took the elective but did not participate in a procurement and with 22 control students. Students who participated in a procurement wrote reflections about their experience. In 2010, 15 first-year students who participated in the elective and a procurement and 59 randomly selected control students completed a previously validated measure. Themes included awe, surgical procedures, learning opportunities, and brain death. Regardless of procurement participation, the elective participants from 2005 to 2007 reported higher 4-item knowledge scores (P<.001) than control students reported, but their 4-item attitude scores did not differ (P = .21). The 2010 students did not differ from control students in their number of correct responses to the 20 knowledge questions (P = .48) or their individual responses to each of the 14 attitude questions (all P>.05). Although elective participants reflected positively on their experiences and professed greater knowledge than control students via a researcher-made tool, these results were not sustained with a previously validated measure. These results point to the need for careful elective design and the need for more accurate measures to study the effectiveness of such interventions.
    Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) 03/2012; 22(1):79-85, 109. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction. Descriptive studies suggest student-run clinics (SRCs) positively affect preclinical students' sociocultural and interprofessional attitudes, but few studies use validated measures. Methods. In a pre-post design, first-year medical, nursing, and pharmacy students who did and did not participate in SRCs completed demographic and open-ended questions, as well as two validated surveys, the Sociocultural Attitudes in Medicine Inventory (SAMI) and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS), at the beginning and end of the year. Results. With 68% (n=182/267) matched surveys we found no significant differences between groups over time (SAMI p=.53, RIPLS p≥.28 for each subcategory). However, of SRC participants, 99% reported commitment to the underserved and 57% reported improved interprofessional attitudes. Discussion. Students participating in SRCs perceive positive benefits, but do not score differently from those who do not. The SRC experiences may not be frequent enough to affect these measures, particularly since our students were high-scoring upon entry.
    Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 01/2012; 23(3):1058-72. · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Student-run clinics (SRCs) are widespread, but studies on their educational impact are limited. We surveyed preclinical medical, nursing, and pharmacy students about their experiences in a hepatitis B elective which provided opportunities to they could volunteer at hepatitis B screening and vaccination SRCs. Student responses revealed positive perceptions of the volunteer experience. Benefits included interacting with patients, developing clinical skills, providing service to disadvantaged populations, and collaborating with health professional peers. Students who participated in clinic reported enhanced skills compared to those who did not attend. SRCs play a valuable role in instilling positive attitudes and improving skills.
    Journal of Cancer Education 06/2011; 26(2):228-33. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The low rate of deceased donor organ donation limits the availability of life-saving transplants. Transplant candidate caregivers are an under-utilized but potentially devoted pool of advocates who themselves may be recruited to register for deceased organ donation. To compare the effectiveness of recruitment materials in Transplant Candidate Caregivers (TCC) and San Francisco Bay Area Health Fair Attendees (HFA). Each subject was given a California Transplant Donor Network educational pamphlet and cohort-coded registration materials. The primary outcome was the number of new registrations per recruitment packet distributed. A total of 232 recruitment packets were distributed; 116 to each of the two cohorts. The TCC group was more likely to be older (49 vs. 45, p = 0.05), female (71 vs. 63%, p = 0.2), Hispanic (21 vs. 5%, 0.001), married (75 vs. 33%, p < 0.0001), and less educated (p = 0.007). Despite demographic differences, the two groups had similar prior donor registration rates (40% TCC vs. 50% HFA, p = 0.11). However, with a minimum 2-week follow-up, the number of new registrations was only nine in the TCC cohort as compared to 38 in the HFA cohort (0.33 vs. 0.80 new registrations/packet, p < 0.0001). The effectiveness of standard deceased donor registration recruitment materials is reduced in Transplant Candidate Caregivers as compared to Health Fair Attendees. This reduced efficacy may be due to dissimilar demographics, psychosocial status at time of recruitment, and beliefs about organ donation. Development of audience specific recruitment materials may improve efforts to register Transplant Candidate Caregivers for deceased organ donation.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 01/2011; 56(5):1535-41. · 2.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: in troduction . Descriptive studies suggest student-run clinics (SRCs) positively affect preclinical students' sociocultural and interprofessional attitudes, but few studies use validated measures. me thods. In a pre-post design, first-year medical, nursing, and pharmacy students who did and did not participate in SRCs completed demographic and open-ended questions, as well as two validated surveys, the Sociocultural Attitudes in Medi- cine Inventory (SAMI) and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS), at the beginning and end of the year. res ults. With 68% (n182/267) matched surveys we found no significant differences between groups over time (SAMI p.53, RIPLS p.28 for each subcategory). However, of SRC participants, 99% reported commitment to the underserved and 57% reported improved interprofessional attitudes. Discussion. Students participating in SRCs perceive positive benefits, but do not score differently from those who do not. The SRC experiences may not be frequent enough to affect these measures, particularly since our students were high-scoring upon entry.