Pamela Catton

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (34)48.03 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives In response to the dearth of consumer health information for patients with gastrointestinal cancers, this study examined the informational needs of these patients to build a plan for future resource development. Although studies have examined informational needs of some such cancers, no published literature has investigated the comprehensive informational needs across all sites of gastrointestinal cancer.MethodsA cross-sectional needs assessment comprising a self-administered questionnaire was conducted at an ambulatory gastrointestinal oncology clinic in Toronto, Canada. Patient informational needs were measured, including importance of information, amount desired and preferred mode of delivery. Informational needs were grouped into six domains: medical, practical, physical, emotional, social and spiritual.ResultsEighty-two surveys were analysed. The majority of the respondents were male (53.8%), over the age of 50 (77.8%), and born outside of Canada (51.9%). While many did not speak English as a child (46.3%), and do not speak English at home (22.2%), nearly all indicated comfort with receiving health information in English (97.5%). The majority of respondents were college educated (79.3%) and married (73%). Multiple cancer types were reported; the most common being colorectal (39%), followed by pancreatic (12%) and cancers of the gallbladder or bile duct (12%). Overall, respondents placed highest importance on medical information (P < 0.001). Preferred education modalities were pamphlets, websites and one-on-one discussions with health-care professionals.Conclusions This study highlights the principal informational needs of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies, along with preferred modality for information delivery. This information will guide the development of educational resources for future patients.
    Health expectations: an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy 11/2014; · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer survivors are likely to have low health literacy which is an independent risk factor for poorer health outcomes. The eHealth literacy in lung cancer survivors has not been reported. The purposes of this study were to determine self-perceived eHealth literacy levels in lung cancer survivors and to explore predictors of higher eHealth literacy. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada. Survivors completed a survey that collected demographic, self-perceived eHealth literacy (using the eHealth Literacy Scale), and quality of life information. Tumor and treatment details were extracted from medical records. Demographic data was summarized using descriptive statistics and compared against those with high and low eHealth literacy using Fisher's exact test. Eighty-three survivors were enrolled over 7 months. Median age was 71 years (range 44-89); 41 survivors (49 %) were male. Forty-six (55 %) survivors had some college education or higher. Most had access to eResources (78 %) via computer, Internet, or smartphone. Fifty-seven (69 %) scored 5 or greater (7 = excellent) on the overall health scale. Twenty-eight (33.7 %) perceived themselves to have high eHealth literacy. There was no statistically significant correlation between eHealth literacy groups and age (p = 1.00), gender (p = 0.82), living situation (p = 1.00), overall health (p = 1.00), overall quality of life (QoL) (p = 1.00), or histology (p = 0.74). High eHealth literacy correlated with the level of education received (p = 0.003) and access to eResources (p = 0.004). The self-perceived eHealth literacy of lung cancer survivors is generally low.
    Journal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education. 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and educational value of high-fidelity, interprofessional team-based simulation in radiation oncology.
    Radiation oncology (London, England). 08/2014; 9(1):189.
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    Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences 06/2014; 45(2):166.
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence suggests that fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is one of the most frequently cited unmet needs among cancer survivors and is associated with psychological distress, stress-response symptoms, and lower quality of life, as well as increased use of health care resources. Despite these factors, few manualized interventions exist to address FCR among cancer survivors. To develop, manualize, and pilot test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a 6-week cognitive-existential (CE) group intervention designed to address FCR in women with breast or ovarian cancer. This study was a single-arm multi-site study with pre-, post-, and 3-month follow-up measurement occasions. A total of 56 breast or ovarian cancer survivors enrolled in the study; 44 completed the CE group intervention. Following the intervention, women experienced a reduction in the primary study outcome measure of FCR and secondary study outcome measures of cancer-specific distress and uncertainty. They also reported improvements in secondary study outcome measures of quality of life and coping. The effect sizes of the observed changes were for the most part in the medium to large effect range; furthermore, almost all changes were sustained at 3-month follow-up. This brief intervention appears feasible and has shown promising results in addressing FCR and related secondary outcomes of cancer-specific distress, uncertainty, quality of life, and coping; however, it should be further tested using a randomized controlled study design to more definitively assess its efficacy. FCR is a near-universal worry for cancer survivors that, when left unaddressed, tends to remain stable over time. This study has important implications for all cancer survivors as it is the first published intervention that provides preliminary evidence of its efficacy in decreasing fear of cancer recurrence.
    Journal of Cancer Survivorship 04/2014; · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Men receiving androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer have low knowledge of osteoporosis (OP) and engage in few healthy bone behaviors (HBBs). A multicomponent intervention was piloted in this population. Changes in OP knowledge, self-efficacy, health beliefs, and engagement in HBBs were evaluated. A pre-post pilot study was performed in a convenience sample of men recruited from the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. Men were sent personalized letters explaining their dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) results and fracture risk assessment with an OP-related education booklet. Participants completed questionnaires assessing OP knowledge, self-efficacy, health beliefs, and current engagement in HBBs at baseline (T1) and 3 months post-intervention (T2). Paired t tests and McNemar's test were used to assess changes in outcomes. A total of 148 men completed the study. There was an increase in OP knowledge (9.7 ± 4.3 to 11.4 ± 3.3, p < 0.0001) and feelings of susceptibility (16.5 ± 4.3 to 17.4 ± 4.7, p = 0.015), but a decrease in total self-efficacy (86.3 ± 22.9 to 81.0 ± 27.6, p = 0.007) from baseline to post-intervention. Men made appropriate changes in their overall daily calcium intake (p ≤ 0.001), and there was uptake of vitamin D supplementation from 44 % (n = 65) to 68 % (n = 99) (p < 0.0001). Men with bone loss (osteopenia or OP) had a greater change in susceptibility (1.9 ± 4.3 vs. -0.22 ± 4.2, p = 0.005) compared to men with normal bone density. Our results provide preliminary evidence that a multicomponent intervention such as the one described can lead to increased knowledge and feelings of susceptibility regarding OP and can enhance uptake of some HBBs.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 04/2014; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The criteria for determining whether resources are included in consumer health library collections are summarized in institutional collection development policies (CDPs). Evidence suggests that CDPs do not adequately capture all of these criteria. The aim of this study was to describe the resource review experience of librarians and compare it to what is described in CDPs.
    Journal of the Medical Library Association JMLA 04/2014; 102(2):78-84. · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Evidence suggests that fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is one of the most frequently cited unmet needs among cancer survivors and is associated with psychological distress, stress-response symptoms, and lower quality of life, as well as increased use of health care resources. Despite these factors, few manualized interventions exist to address FCR among cancer survivors. Purpose To develop, manualize, and pilot test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a 6-week cognitive-existential (CE) group intervention designed to address FCR in women with breast or ovarian cancer. Methods This study was a single-arm multi-site study with pre-, post-, and 3-month follow-up measurement occasions. Results A total of 56 breast or ovarian cancer survivors enrolled in the study; 44 completed the CE group inter-vention. Following the intervention, women experienced a reduction in the primary study outcome measure of FCR and secondary study outcome measures of cancer-specific distress and uncertainty. They also reported improvements in secondary study outcome measures of quality of life and coping. The effect sizes of the observed changes were for the most part in the medium to large effect range; furthermore, almost all changes were sustained at 3-month follow-up. Conclusion This brief intervention appears feasible and has shown promising results in addressing FCR and related sec-ondary outcomes of cancer-specific distress, uncertainty, qual-ity of life, and coping; however, it should be further tested using a randomized controlled study design to more defini-tively assess its efficacy. Implications for Cancer Survivors FCR is a near-universal worry for cancer survivors that, when left unaddressed, tends to remain stable over time. This study has important
  • Lori J Bernstein, Pamela A Catton, Ian F Tannock
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    ABSTRACT: Studies assessing cognitive functioning in women treated for breast cancer have used primarily standardized neuropsychological tests and examined accuracy and/or reaction time as outcome measures: they have been inconsistent in identifying the cognitive domains affected and the severity of deficits. In other contexts of neural development and disorders, measures of Intra-individual variability (IIV) have proven useful in identifying subtleties in performance deficits that are not captured by measures of central tendency. This article presents proof of concept that assessing IIV may also increase understanding of the cognitive effects of cancer treatment. We analyzed mean accuracy and reaction time, as well as IIV from 65 women with breast cancer and 28 age and education matched controls who performed the Conner's Continuous Performance Test, a "Go-NoGo" task. Although there were no significant differences between groups using measures of central tendency, there was a group × inter-stimulus interval (ISI) interaction for IIV Dispersion (p < .001). Patient Dispersion was more variable at shorter ISI than controls and less variable at long ISI, suggesting greater sensitivity to presentation speed. Interpretation of IIV differences requires further investigation. Our results suggest that future studies would benefit from designs that allow analysis of IIV measures in studies assessing cognition in cancer survivors. (JINS, 2014, 20, 1-11).
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 03/2014; · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is growing recognition of the importance of patient education given the prevalence and consequences of low health literacy in Canada and the USA. Research has shown that in addition to plain language, the use of theories of learning can contribute to the effectiveness of patient education resources, and as such, various guidelines and toolkits have been put together to help healthcare providers utilize these theories. Despite these efforts, this knowledge is not consistently applied in practice. To address this gap, we describe a new theory-based protocol, the "3Ws and an H," that is designed to guide healthcare providers in the production of effective patient education resources. Adult learning theory underpins each step of the process, and by using the "3Ws and an H," relevant theories are applied as the steps of the protocol are followed. To facilitate the adoption of this process, we describe it using a resource development project for survivors of endometrial cancer as an example.
    Journal of Cancer Education 01/2014; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent media attention about radiation has led to heightened public awareness and concern about radiation therapy (RT). An understanding of concerns and their potential role in patient decision-making can inform education efforts. A multiphase needs assessment survey was designed to ascertain broad public perceptions of radiation (phase I) and the more in-depth cancer patient perceptions of RT (phase II). One hundred forty-six phase I and 111 phase II surveys were completed. Data suggested a prevalence of negative connotations of the word "radiation," often associated with information from the media or secondhand experience. Side effects during and after RT were reported as concerns, including misperceptions about becoming radioactive and impact on fertility. Rankings of quality and safety perceptions suggested confidence in staff training and equipment, though concerns regarding overdoses and protection of healthy tissue were higher amongst those who refused RT. In deciding whether or not to undergo RT, high value was placed on the reputation of the cancer centre and the expected effectiveness of RT. The importance of understanding RT was more highly regarded by those who underwent RT than those who refused it. Perceptions of RT should thus be addressed amongst those in a position to consider RT, to maximize RT utilization where appropriate.
    Journal of Cancer Education 01/2014; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Rapid evolution of imaging technologies and their integration into radiation therapy practice demands that radiation oncology (RO) training curricula be updated. The purpose of this study was to develop an entry-to-practice image literacy competency profile. Methods and Materials A list of 263 potential imaging competency items were assembled from international objectives of training. Expert panel eliminated redundant or irrelevant items to create a list of 97 unique potential competency items. An international 2-round Delphi process was conducted with experts in RO. In round 1, all experts scored, on a 9-point Likert scale, the degree to which they agreed an item should be included in the competency profile. Items with a mean score ≥7 were included, those 4 to 6 were reviewed in round 2, and items scored <4 were excluded. In round 2, items were discussed and subsequently ranked for inclusion or exclusion in the competency profile. Items with >75% voting for inclusion were included in the final competency profile. Results Forty-nine radiation oncologists were invited to participate in round 1, and 32 (65%) did so. Participants represented 24 centers in 6 countries. Of the 97 items ranked in round 1, 80 had a mean score ≥7, 1 item had a score <4, and 16 items with a mean score of 4 to 6 were reviewed and rescored in round 2. In round 2, 4 items had >75% of participants voting for inclusion and were included; the remaining 12 were excluded. The final list of 84 items formed the final competency profile. The 84 enabling competency items were aggregated into the following 4 thematic groups of key competencies: (1) imaging fundamentals (42 items); (2) clinical application (27 items); (3) clinical management (5 items); and (4) professional practice (10 items). Conclusions We present an imaging literacy competency profile which could constitute the minimum training standards in radiation oncology residency programs.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 01/2014; 88(4):961–966. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Il existe une lacune dans le curriculum des programmes de résidence en radio-oncologie en ce qui a trait à l'imagerie. Cette étude, menée selon une approche interprofessionnelle, vise à déterminer les éléments d'un profil de compétences de littératie en imagerie et les pratiques éducatives exemplaires actuelles. Les professionnels et les stagiaires en médecine des rayonnements affiliés à un programme unique de résidence en radio-oncologie ont été invités à participer à des groupes de discussion interprofessionnels semi-structurés. Les questions portaient sur la définition de la littératie en imagerie, les meilleures pratiques d'enseignement actuelles et les compétences requises. Les enregistrements audio ont été retranscrits mot à mot et les données ont été codées et analysées de manière itérative. Les thèmes ont été recensés à l'aide de la méthode de comparaison constante. Dix médecins (trois cliniciens et sept stagiaires), huit radiothérapeutes et six physiciens ont participé à quatre groupes de discussion d'une durée moyenne de 52 minutes (variant entre 47 et 59 minutes). La littératie en imagerie a été définie comme la connaissance des indications pour l'imagerie et les compétences de manipulation des images, à toutes les étapes du diagnostic, du traitement et de l'évaluation de la réponse. Les lacunes dans les programmes de formation actuels comprennent le manque d'expertise, d'objectifs définis ou d'évaluations structurées en imagerie. Les participants ont exprimé le besoin d'une approche interprofessionnelle de l'enseignement de la littératie en imagerie. Les participants ont donné une image complète de la littératie en imagerie pour les radio-oncologues qu'il n'est pas possible d'atteindre dans le cadre d'une approche uniprofessionnelle. Les éléments de compétence suggérés nécessitent un développement plus poussé avec la participation de collègues d'autres professions, notamment des thérapeutes et des physiciens, avant leur intégration à des programmes de résidence.
    Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences 09/2013; 44(3):150–156.
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    M Siu, P Catton, J Jones, A R Jadad
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    ABSTRACT: With improved average longevity, the issue of polypathology in the cancer population is of growing importance, because it will increasingly affect more people. The present study piloted two self-report surveys aiming to provide preliminary data on the nature of polypathology and supportive care needs (met and unmet) of cancer survivors. Survivors were recruited from outpatient clinics at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto and were asked to complete and give feedback on the surveys. Of a convenience sample of 88 survivors, almost three quarters (73%) reported having polypathology, and 64% had at least 1 unmet need. Results also suggest that those with the highest number of needs were more likely to have polypathology. Our study invites further assessments with self-report surveys of the complex picture that arises when cancer is not the only disease affecting a person. It also highlights the need for innovative supportive services to address patient needs.
    Current Oncology 06/2013; 20(3):e266-9. · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Distress in husbands of women with early-stage breast cancer may be equivalent to or even higher than their wives. Husbands often struggle to help and support their wives cope with the illness and its treatment. In response, we developed a five-session group educational counselling intervention (Helping Her Heal-Group (HHH-G)) for husbands of women with early-stage breast cancer. The primary aim of the current pilot study was to determine the acceptability and feasibility of HHH-G and to obtain a preliminary estimate of its impact on participating men's skills, self-confidence and self care. Secondary aims were to assess the impact of the intervention on both the participating spouses' and wives' ratings of marital quality and depressed mood. METHODS: The study employed a one-arm, pre-post-intervention design whereby participating men (n = 54) and their wives (n = 54) independently completed measures at baseline (T0), immediately following the last session (T1) and 3 months after the last session (T2). RESULTS: Overall, there was very high study retention (87%). On the basis of the questionnaire data, we found significant improvements in spouses' self-efficacy (p < 0.001) and self-reported skills including wife support (p = 0.003) and self-care (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant improvement in wives' mood scores (p = 0.003). Post-intervention interviews support acceptability and impact of the HHH-G intervention, and provide support for the group format of the program. CONCLUSIONS: The feasibility and acceptability of HHH-G was supported, and treatment outcomes suggest the potential benefits of the intervention. Phase III evaluation of HHH-G program is warranted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Psycho-Oncology 03/2013; · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Advances in breast cancer treatment have increased survival and contributed to longer periods of survivorship as reported by the Committee CCSsS (Canadian Cancer Statistics) (2011) and Hewitt et al. (2005), increasing the relevance of survivorship care. Survivorship care includes encouraging survivors to acquire the knowledge, skills and confidence to manage their life, as well as engaging survivors through post-diagnosis disease self-management and self-care strategies. The Survivorship Consult (SC) was designed to help survivors reflect on their needs, establish goals and create an action plan. METHODS: Twenty-six breast cancer survivors who participated in the SC at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre took part in semi-structured interviews to assess the survivor experience and effectiveness of the SC. Data from these interviews were coded, and themes were identified using a modified grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Themes that emerged regarding the experience and effectiveness of the SC included (1) the supportive experience of collaborative dialogue with supportive care clinicians (i.e. nurses, social workers, occupational therapists, etc.), (2) the development of personalized goals that motivated individuals to implement recommendations, (3) an enhanced understanding of their health condition, team and options, (4) an improved ability to identify needs and (5) an increased sense of confidence to manage issues related to care. CONCLUSIONS: The assessment of the SC improved the experience of breast cancer patients by providing a supportive environment where they could feel cared about, by increasing understanding of their condition and its treatment, by improving communication with the care team and by motivating patients to manage care issues. Further research is needed on survivors who conduct the SC before the treatment phase of their cancer trajectory.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 03/2013; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: There is an increase in use and duration of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with prostate cancer. ADT can cause decreased bone mineral density and lean muscle loss, putting these patients at increased risk of fracture. Guidelines exist for the prevention and management of bone loss in this population; however, data suggests that most patients are not receiving proper screening, evaluation, or treatment for bone loss. Research to date suggests that patients on ADT are unaware of the risks and side-effects of ADT and that most are not engaging in important preventative behaviours, e.g. calcium and vitamin D intake. To our knowledge, there are no studies in patients on ADT specifically assessing patients' osteoporosis (OP) knowledge, self-efficacy, and feelings of susceptibility towards OP and their relationships to engagement in recommended healthy bone behaviours. We think that these data will aid in the development of health promotion uptake strategies that are directly targeted to this patient population. OBJECTIVES: To describe in patients with prostate cancer, receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT): (i) knowledge, self-efficacy (SE), and health beliefs about osteoporosis (OP); (ii) current engagement in healthy bone behaviours (HBBs). To explore the relationships between knowledge, SE, and health beliefs, and engagement in HBBs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 175 patients receiving ADT by injection completed questionnaires assessing current HBBs, OP knowledge, SE, and health beliefs (motivation, perceived susceptibility, and seriousness). Descriptive statistics and independent samples t-tests were used to assess relationships between knowledge, SE, health beliefs, and engagement in HBBs. RESULTS: Only 38% of patients had undergone a dual X-ray absorptiometry scan in the past 2 years. OP knowledge was low (mean [sd, range] 9.6 [4.4, 0-19]) and perceived SE moderate (84.7 [24.5, 0-120]). Health motivation was fairly high (23.6 [3.1, 6-30]), but perceived susceptibility (16.8 [4.3]) and seriousness (16.8 [4.2]) of OP were low. Few patients met the recommendations for vitamin D intake (42%) and exercise (31%), and 15% were at risk of over-supplementation of calcium. Patients taking calcium supplements (P = 0.04), and meeting guidelines for vitamin D (P = 0.008) and for exercise (P = 0.002) had significantly greater knowledge than those who did not. Patients who were engaging in less than four of five HBBs had lower knowledge (P < 0.001) and health motivation (P = 0.01) than those who were engaging in four or all five HBBs. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients who are receiving ADT are not receiving appropriate screening, lack basic information about bone health, and are not engaging in the appropriate HBBs. These findings support the application of the Health Belief Model in this population: interventions that teach patients about the implications of bone loss, encourage proper uptake of HBBs, and promote feelings of SE could increase engagement in HBBs to prevent and manage bone loss.
    BJU International 01/2013; · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Radiation therapy (RT) is effective treatment for curing and palliating cancer, yet concern exists that not all Canadians for whom RT is indicated receive it. Many factors may contribute to suboptimal use of RT. A review of recent Canadian literature was undertaken to identify such barriers. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBase databases were used to search keywords relating to barriers to accessing or utilizing RT in Canada. Collected abstracts were reviewed independently. Barriers identified in relevant articles were categorized as relating to the health systems, patient socio-demographic, patient factors, or provider factors contexts and thematic analysis performed for each context. RESULTS: 535 unique abstracts were collected. 75 met inclusion criteria. 46 (61.3%) addressed multiple themes. The most cited barriers to accessing RT when indicated were patient age (n=26, 34.7%), distance to treatment centre (n=23, 30.7%), wait times (n=22, 29.3%), and lack of physician understanding about the use of RT (n=16, 21.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Barriers to RT are reported in many areas. The role of provider factors and the lack of attention to patient fears and mistrust as potential barriers were unexpected findings demanding further attention. Solutions should be sought to overcome identified barriers facilitating more effective cancer care for Canadians.
    Radiation Oncology 10/2012; 7(1):167. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In preparation for the launch of a gynecologic oncology survivorship program, this study looked at the informational needs of women with gynecologic cancers. Although studies have touched on some of these needs, no published literature has investigated the comprehensive informational needs of gynecologic oncology patients within all sites of gynecologic cancers. A needs assessment, consisting of a self-administered questionnaire, was conducted at an ambulatory gynecologic oncology clinic from August 2010 to March 2011. This study investigated the informational needs of patients, including the importance of information, the amount desired, and the preferred mode of delivery. Informational needs were grouped into six domains: medical, practical, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual. 185 surveys were analyzed and the majority of the respondents were Caucasian (77%) and over the age of 50 (66%). Forty-nine percent of respondents were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and there was an even distribution between newly diagnosed patients (38%), those in long-term follow-up (27%), and those with recurrent disease (37%). Overall, respondents placed more importance on receiving medical information (P<0.01). The three preferred education modalities were; pamphlets, one-on-one discussions with health care professionals and websites. Age, education, and disease site were associated with differing informational needs. This study has highlighted the most important informational needs of patients with gynecologic malignancies in our patient population. This information may guide the development of clinical survivorship programs and educational resources for patients in the future.
    Gynecologic Oncology 10/2011; 124(3):452-7. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Patients with breast cancer experience unmet informational and psychosocial needs at the end of treatment. A brief psychoeducational intervention delivered at this transition may help to address some of the challenges these women face. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a single-session group psychoeducational intervention (GBOT group) compared with standard print material (usual care). METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 442 patients with breast cancer who were completing their adjuvant radiotherapy were recruited and randomized to receive either usual care, which includes standard print material (CRL group n = 226) or usual care and the GBOT group intervention (INT group n = 216). Participants completed measures at baseline and again at 3 and 6 months post-intervention. RESULTS: The INT group showed significant improvement in their knowledge regarding the re-entry transition period (d = 0.31) and in their feelings of preparedness for re-entry (d = 0.37). There were no differences between the groups over time on health-related distress or mood. CONCLUSIONS: Results support the effectiveness of providing a single-session group psychoeducational intervention as a first-step approach to supportive care for women at the end of breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Psycho-Oncology 09/2011; · 3.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

94 Citations
48.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • University of Toronto
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2006–2014
    • The Princess Margaret Hospital
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2013
    • Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2010
    • University Health Network
      • Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada