Ozren Jaksic

Klinička bolnica Dubrava, Zagrabia, Grad Zagreb, Croatia

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Publications (33)99.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Autologous haematopoietic SCT with PBSCs is regularly used to restore BM function in patients with multiple myeloma or lymphoma after myeloablative chemotherapy. Twenty-eight experts from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation developed a position statement on the best approaches to mobilising PBSCs and on possibilities of optimising graft yields in patients who mobilise poorly. Choosing the appropriate mobilisation regimen, based on patients' disease stage and condition, and optimising the apheresis protocol can improve mobilisation outcomes. Several factors may influence mobilisation outcomes, including older age, a more advanced disease stage, the type of prior chemotherapy (e.g., fludarabine or melphalan), prior irradiation or a higher number of prior treatment lines. The most robust predictive factor for poor PBSC collection is the CD34(+) cell count in PB before apheresis. Determination of the CD34(+) cell count in PB before apheresis helps to identify patients at risk of poor PBSC collection and allows pre-emptive intervention to rescue mobilisation in these patients. Such a proactive approach might help to overcome deficiencies in stem cell mobilisation and offers a rationale for the use of novel mobilisation agents.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 31 March 2014; doi:10.1038/bmt.2014.39.
    Bone marrow transplantation 03/2014; · 3.00 Impact Factor
  • British Journal of Haematology 02/2014; · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the expression and function of NOTCH1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients harboring a wild-type or mutated NOTCH1 gene. NOTCH1 mRNA and surface protein expression levels were independent of the NOTCH1 gene mutational status, consistent with the requirement for NOTCH1 signaling in this leukemia. However, compared to NOTCH1 wild-type CLL, mutated cases displayed biochemical and transcriptional evidence of an intense activation of the NOTCH1 pathway. In vivo, expression and activation of NOTCH1 was highest in CLL cells from the lymph nodes, as confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro, the NOTCH1 pathway was rapidly down-regulated, suggesting that signaling relies upon micro-environmental interactions, even in NOTCH1 mutated cases. Accordingly, co-culture of Jagged1(+) (the NOTCH1 ligand) nurse-like cells with autologous CLL cells sustained NOTCH1 activity over time and mediated CLL survival and resistance against pro-apoptotic stimuli, both abrogated when NOTCH1 signaling was pharmacologically switched off. Together, these results show that NOTCH1 mutations have stabilizing effects on the NOTCH1 pathway in CLL. Furthermore, micro-environmental interactions appear critical in activating the NOTCH1 pathway both in wild-type and mutated patients. Lastly, NOTCH1 signals may create conditions that favor drug resistance, thus making NOTCH1 a potential molecular target in CLL.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 30 October 2013; doi:10.1038/leu.2013.319.
    Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 10/2013; · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is marked by profound defects in T cell function. Programmed death-1 is a receptor involved in tumor-mediated immunosuppression through binding of the PD-L1 ligand. Design and Methods. Multiparameter flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry were used to study PD-1/PD-L1 expression. Functional assays were used to determine the involvement of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in T cell responses. Results. PD-1 expression by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was significantly higher in 117 chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients than in 33 donors of a comparable age. CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients displayed increased numbers of effector memory and terminally differentiated cells, respectively, when compared to controls. The number of effector memory CD4+ and terminally differentiated CD8+ lymphocytes positively associated with a more advanced stage of disease, treatment requirements and unfavorable genomic aberrations. Furthermore, leukemic lymphocytes expressed higher levels of PD-L1 than circulating B lymphocytes from normal donors. PD-1 and PD-L1 surface expression spiked in proliferating T and B lymphocytes, suggesting that this interaction works efficiently in activated environments. Within chronic lymphocytic leukemia proliferation centers in the lymph node, CD4+/PD-1+ T lymphocytes were found to be in close contact with PD-L1+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Lastly, functional experiments using recombinant soluble PD-L1 and blocking antibodies indicated that this axis contributes to the inhibition of IFN-gamma production by CD8+ T cells. Conclusions. These observations suggest that pharmacological manipulation of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis may contribute to restoring T cell functions in the chronic lymphocytic leukemia microenvironment.
    Haematologica 01/2013; · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Monocytes actively participate in inflammatory mechanisms that contribute to the development of adipose tissue dysfunction and atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of monocyte CCR2 chemokine receptor expression and intracellular oxidative burst with the metabolic and inflammatory factors related to body weight. Methods: The study was performed in 67 postmenopausal women with normal, overweight and obese body mass index. Monocyte CCR2 surface expression and intracellular oxidative burst activity (determined using 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum levels of HMW adoponectin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), insulin, glucose, lipids and C-reactive protein were determined. Results: Subjects with homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) above the median had significantly higher proportion of CCR2+ monocytes and higher mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CCR2 and oxidative burst. The proportion of CCR2+ monocytes and CCR2 MFI were correlated with body weight, body mass index, fat mass, insulin and HOMA-IR. Oxidative burst also correlated with anthropometric measures, fat mass and expression of CCR2. No correlations were found between these markers of monocyte activation and HMW adiponectin or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. The absolute number of monocytes was associated with insulin and this association remained significant after adjusting for C-reactive protein. In the multiple regression model the monocyte number was determined to be an independent predictor of insulin level. Conclusion: These results provide support for significant associations of monocyte number and markers involved in monocyte activation with obesity and insulin resistance.
    Clinical and investigative medicine. Medecine clinique et experimentale 01/2013; 36(1):E24. · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Plerixafor with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to enhance stem cell mobilization in patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma with previous mobilization failure. In this European named patient program we report the experience in insufficiently mobilizing patients diagnosed with nonhematologic diseases. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients with germ cell tumor (n = 11), Ewing sarcoma (n = 6), Wiscott-Aldrich disease (n = 5), neuroblastoma (n = 4), and other nonhematologic diseases (n = 7) were included in the study. Plerixafor was limited to patients with previous or current stem cell mobilization failure and given after 4 days of G-CSF (n = 21) or after chemotherapy and G-CSF (n = 12) in patients who mobilized poorly. RESULTS: Overall, 28 (85%) patients succeeded in collecting at least 2 × 10(6) /kg body weight (b.w.) CD34+ cells (median, 5.0 × 10(6) /kg b.w. CD34+ cells; range, 2.0 × 10(6) -29.5 × 10(6) /kg b.w. CD34+ cells), and five (15%) patients collected a median of 1.5 × 10(6) /kg b.w. CD34+ cells (range, 0.9 × 10(6) -1.8 × 10(6) /kg b.w. CD34+ cells). Nineteen patients proceeded to transplantation. The median dose of CD34+ cells infused was 3.3 × 10(6) /kg b.w. (range, 2.3 × 10(6) -6.7 × 10(6) /kg b.w. CD34+ cells). The median numbers of days to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 11 (range, 9-12) and 15 (range, 10-25) days, respectively. CONCLUSION: These data emphasize the role of plerixafor in combination with G-CSF or chemotherapy and G-CSF as an effective mobilization regimen with the potential of successful stem cell collection. Accordingly, plerixafor seems to be safe and effective in patients with nonhematologic diseases. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further assess its use in these patients.
    Transfusion 03/2012; · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fludarabine and lenalidomide are essential drugs in the front-line treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM), respectively. Data suggests that fludarabine and lenalidomide therapy may have a deleterious effect on stem cell mobilization. In the European compassionate use program, 48 patients (median age 57 years) previously treated with fludarabine (median 5 cycles; range: 1-7 cycles) were given plerixafor plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for remobilization following a primary mobilization attempt. The overall median number of CD34+ cells collected was 2.3 × 10(6)/kg (range: 0.3-13.4). The minimum required number of CD34+ cells (≥2.0 × 10(6)/kg) was collected from 58% of patients in a median of 2 days. Thirty-five patients (median age = 57 years) previously treated with lenalidomide (median 5 cycles; range: 1-10 cycles) were given plerixafor plus G-CSF for remobilization. The overall median number of CD34+ cells collected was 3.4 × 10(6)/kg (range: 1.1-14.8). The minimum required number of CD34+ cells (≥2.0 × 10(6) per kg) was collected from 69% of patients in a median of 2 days. In conclusion, salvage mobilization with plerixafor plus G-CSF is successful in the majority of patients with MM previously treated with lenalidomide. In fludarabine-exposed patients, only 58% of patients will achieve successful salvage mobilization with plerixafor plus G-CSF, suggesting the need for novel mobilization regimens algorithms in this subgroup of patients.
    Biology of blood and marrow transplantation: journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation 02/2012; 18(2):314-7. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of the novel hematopoietic stem cell mobilizing agent plerixafor was evaluated in nationwide compassionate use programs in 13 European countries. A total of 580 poor mobilizers with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) were enrolled. All patients received plerixafor plus granulocyte CSF with or without chemotherapy. Overall, the collection yield was significantly higher in MM patients (>2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 81.6%; >5.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 32.0%) than in NHL patients (>2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 64.8%; >5.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 12.6%; P<0.0001) and also significantly higher in HL patients (>2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 81.5%; >5.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 22.2%) than in NHL patients (P=0.013). In a subgroup analysis, there were no significant differences in mobilization success comparing patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma. Our data emphasize the role of plerixafor in poor mobilizers, but further strategies to improve the apheresis yield especially in patients with NHL are required.
    Bone marrow transplantation 11/2011; 47(8):1046-50. · 3.00 Impact Factor
  • Bone marrow transplantation 10/2011; 47(7):1003-5. · 3.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The introduction of plerixafor has enabled successful collection of stem cells in the majority of patients with lymphoma or myeloma in whom previous attempts at mobilization have failed. However, a proportion of patients have been shown to be resistant to this mobilization regimen. To identify the factors that impair stem cell mobilization and collection with plerixafor, we reviewed the data for 197 patients who had undergone mobilization with plerixafor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in Central Europe. Predictors of mobilization failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Among the 197 patients mobilized, the target of ≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg was collected from 133 (67.5%). Our analysis revealed that previous treatment with lenalidomide, bortezomib, melphalan, radiotherapy, or autologous stem cell transplantation and regimen of plerixafor use in combination with chemotherapy had no significant effect on the efficiency of collection. In contrast, an age ≥65 years (odds ratio 0.331, 95% CI: 0.112-0.977, P < 0.05), a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (odds ratio 0.277, 95% CI: 0.124-0.622, P < 0.01), and treatment with ≥ four chemotherapy regimens (odds ratio 0.366, 95% CI: 0.167-0.799, P < 0.05) were associated significantly with failed mobilization. The rate of successful mobilizations was decreased in patients treated with purine analogues (odds ratio 0.323, 95% CI: 0.096-1.094, P = 0.07) but increased in female patients (odds ratio 1.961, CI: 0.943-4.080, P = 0.07). Patients who are characterized by the above negative features could benefit potentially from further improvement in the mobilization strategy.
    American Journal of Hematology 07/2011; 86(7):550-3. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plerixafor can rescue the outcome of failing chemotherapy-based stem cell mobilization. However, the optimal time for plerixafor injection in this setting has not been determined. This was investigated by retrospective analysis of data from 48 mobilizations with plerixafor, chemotherapy, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The required yield of 2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg was collected from 71% of patients; the median total yield was 4.1 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Patients to whom plerixafor was administered late (≥ 15 days) after chemotherapy, after a long duration (≥ 13 days) of treatment with G-CSF, or when the white blood cell count was high (≥ 20 × 10(9)/L) were mobilized as efficiently as other patients. Plerixafor was shown to rescue mobilizations at a comparable rate in patients with critically low levels of peripheral blood CD34+ cells (<3/µL) and those with higher concentrations. These data suggest that late administration of plerixafor in the course of chemotherapy-based mobilization does not contribute to the failure of this strategy.
    Leukemia & lymphoma 06/2011; 52(9):1711-9. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A proportion of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who have already undergone autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT) might benefit from a further transplantation. For this, they might need to undergo another round of stem cell mobilization. We analyzed retrospectively the outcomes of stem cell mobilization with plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a group of 30 patients who had undergone autoSCT previously, and in 46 other patients. The previously transplanted patients were significantly different from the remaining patients with respect to the intensity and number of previous therapies. We observed that the median peripheral blood concentration of CD34+ cells after the first administration of plerixafor was lower in previously transplanted (19 cells/μL) than in other patients (30 cells/μL, P < 0.05). Despite a comparable number of apheresis sessions being performed, the median total yield of CD34+ cells was significantly lower in the previously transplanted than in the remaining patients (2.8 × 10(6) cells/kg vs. 4.2 × 10(6) cells/kg, P < 0.05). However, successful collection of at least 2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg was achieved finally in a similar proportion of previously transplanted and other patients (70% vs. 82.6%). Our data suggest that stem cell mobilization with plerixafor and G-CSF might overcome the negative effect of prognostic factors for poor stem cell mobilization in patients with MM who have undergone autoSCT previously.
    European Journal Of Haematology 03/2011; 86(6):488-95. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Flow cytometry (FC) immunophenotyping is an important tool in the evaluation of lymphadenopathy and is widely used in the diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) on fine-needle aspirates of lymph nodes and extranodal sites. Because at least 80% of NHLs are of B-cell type, detection of immunoglobulin (Ig) light-chain-restriction is the most commonly used method for confirmation of monoclonality. The aim of our study was to evaluate usefulness of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for FC analysis from deep-seated lymph nodes and to compare results of FC clonality analysis to cytomorphologic diagnosis of sampled lymph nodes. For cytological diagnosis direct smears were made, selected slide was stained for rapid-on site evaluation procedure. Sixteen patients with suspected NHL of deep-seated lymph nodes obtained by EUS-FNA were submitted for FC clonality analysis using four-color multiparameter flow cytometry stained with kappa/lambda/CD19/CD45. Clonality analysis was performed on 11 samples. Monoclonality was demonstrated in seven of 11 cases cytologically diagnosed as NHL and four of 11 cases cytologically diagnosed as benign were polyclonal. Our results show that EUS-FNAC with FC is a sensitive and specific tool in the diagnosis of deep-seated B-NHL. Cytologic diagnosis combined with FC clonality analysis can be performed in majority of cases and may eliminate need for open biopsy in some cases.
    Collegium antropologicum 06/2010; 34(2):377-80. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: According to WHO classification follicular lymphoma (FL) is a neoplasm composed of follicle centre (germinal centre) B-cells, which usually has at least a partially follicular pattern. Bone marrow (BM) infiltration by lymphoma occurs in 40-70% of cases at the time of diagnosis. The characteristic chromosomal translocation of follicular lymphoma is t(14;18)(q32;q21) with transposition of BCL2 oncogene to the regulatory region of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene IgH. Aim of this study was to determine the frequency of PCR detection of IgH/BCL2 in DNA samples isolated from archival cytological slides of lymph node aspirates, bone marrow and/or peripheral blood (PB) obtained from patients with histologically confirmed follicular lymphoma using primers and protocol proposed by BIOMED-2 consortium. We also compared molecular with cytomorphological findings in bone marrow/peripheral blood and tested this method of detection of IgH/BCL2 molecular marker in monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) in routine clinical setting. DNA was successfully isolated from all archival cytological slides obtained by fine needle aspiration of lymph nodes as well as from 75% of smears of bone marrow aspirates from 19 patients. Fusion oncogene was detected in 10 of 19 patients (52%). For patients with PCR IgH/BCL2 positive lymph nodes, molecular test found BM infiltration in 5 cases (83%), while cytomorphology detected infiltration in three of eight cases (37%) available for comparison. May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained cytological smears can be used for PCR-based ancillary methods and the rate of detection of IgH/BCL2 rearrangement is similar to results reported for paraffin-embedded tissues. For patients with detectable baseline molecular marker, PCR is a highly suitable method for detection of bone marrow involvement and monitoring MRD.
    Collegium antropologicum 06/2010; 34(2):425-9. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study consisted of morphometric analysis, assessment of the argyrophilic nucleolar organization region (AgNOR) characteristics, and image cytometry (ICM) in different tumor mass compartments: bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) and lymph nodes (LN) from patients with chronic leukemic lymphoproliferative disorders. A total of 71895 cells were analyzed on SFORM PC (VAMSTEC, Zagreb). Correlation between morphometric, AgNOR and ICM characteristics revealed the cells with low proliferative activity to possess small, homogeneous AgNOR, with the majority of cells in the peak of DNA histogram. The cells with high proliferative activity had inhomogeneous AgNOR, mostly containing greater DNA content than peak cells, pathologic mitoses (DNA > 4N), or the majority of cells were in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Cells with medium proliferative activity and annular AgNOR were in-between. Analysis of different tumor mass compartments showed that lymphatic cells with the affinity to accumulate in BM regularly exhibited low proliferative activity (a lower percentage of cells in SFC and highest percentage of cells in the peak of the G0/G1 phase). The cells in LN exhibited the characteristics of proliferative cells (an increased number of AgNOR, larger and more proliferative inhomogeneous AgNOR, and lowest percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase). The migration of cells from BM to LN and between lymph nodes occurred through PB (there were cells with low and high proliferative activity: a higher proportion of cells in SFC and at the same time in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle). Analysis of cell size and proliferative activity in different compartments of tumor mass revealed that the cells in BM and PB did not differ substantially according to size and proliferative activity, while an inverse pattern was observed between PB and LN. As small cells are inactive and larger cells more proliferative, the analysis quite unexpectedly showed the PB cells to be largest and most inactive, in contrast to LN where the cells were smallest and most active. The "single" and "multiple programmed stops" have been hypothesized in the development of typical forms of leukemias and lymphomas and atypical forms of subacute and subchronic leukemias. Differentiation impairment may occur at any stage, and different "stop" locations result in different morphology and affinity to accumulation in bone marrow, peripheral blood and lymph nodes.
    Collegium antropologicum 06/2010; 34(2):367-76. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is characterized by highly variable distribution of tumor mass between peripheral blood, bone marrow and lymphoid organs which is important for staging, classification and prognosis. These clinical findings with novel data about importance of B-cell receptor and its stimulation with the support of microenvironment indicate important role of tissues (lymphoid organs and bone marrow) in the pathogenesis of B-CLL. Here is presented the novel approach of simultaneous characterization of B-CLL cells form peripheral blood, bone marrow and lymph nodes by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, defining inter- and intraclonal diversity with respect to various molecules. These include adhesion molecules (integrins, immunoglobulins, selectins), chemokine receptors (including CXCR-4), signaling molecules and prognostic factors (CD38 and ZAP-70), proliferation and apoptosis markers (including Ki67, AgNORs with PK index, survivin, bcl-2) and therapeutic targets (CD20 and CD52) and residual hematopoietic stem cells. A number of interesting significant interactions have been discovered, pointing to the important role of neoplastic cell microenvironment. These may in addition to insights in pathogenesis and roles of different microenvironments add to diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of B-CLL patients.
    Collegium antropologicum 03/2010; 34(1):309-13. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Today lymphomas are defined according to a combination of morphology, immunophenotype, genetic features and clinical presentation, so beside the pure cytomorphologic analysis in diagnosis of lymphoma ancillary techniques such as cytochemistry, immunocytochemistry, molecular diagnosis and flow cytometry (FC) are often used. Our goal was to determinate how is information given by fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and FC correlated with pathohistologic diagnosis and to evaluate ability to diagnose and subclassify malignant lymphomas by FNAC and FC. This study is a retrospective chart review of patients with suspicion of lymphoma processed at University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb. After analysis 50 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria for this study (FNAC diagnosis with or without FC and consecutive confirmatory pathohistological diagnosis). When analyzing accuracy of FNAC according to suspicion of lymphoma or NHL and differential diagnosis lymphoma sensitivity was 97.7%, specificity 85.7% and the diagnostic accuracy was 96%. When analyzing accuracy of FNAC according to the subclassification of lymphoma, sensitivity was 74.4%, specificity 85.7% and the diagnostic accuracy 76%. Combined FNAC and FC improved sensitivity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy. Sensitivity was 79.1% and the diagnostic accuracy 80%. We have shown that these methods can distinguish benign lymphadenopaties from lymphomas and also subclassify lymphomas and quickly provide clinicians with that information.
    Collegium antropologicum 03/2010; 34(1):131-7. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic inflammation has arised as a major underlying cause of atherosclerosis, obesity and diabetes. It is mediated by cells of innate immune system like macrophages but also by their antecedents, circulating monocytes. Roles of monocyte subsets and different markers of monocyte activation in the context of metabolic disorders have been reviewed. Applying cell based approach through flow cytometry in this field has resulted with new understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms. Possible implications of these insights in diagnosis, prognosis and revealing of therapeutic targets in metabolic disorders remain a challenge for future.
    Collegium antropologicum 03/2010; 34(1):319-25. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To introduce new parameters of diploid histogram of image DNA cytometry and new types of silver-stained nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and to validate resulting proliferative-kinetic index (PKI) in a prognostic study of patients with chronic leukemic lymphoproliferative disorders (CLLPD). A total of 413 smears of from various tumor mass compartments-bone marrow, peripheral blood and lymph node-were analyzed in CLLPD as a whole, as well as separately in the B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia with variants (B-CLL+V). The analysis of the diploid histogram included percentage of cells at the peak of the DNA histogram and percentage of cells with lower and higher contents of DNA than cells at the peak. The new types of AgNORs were described as homogeneous, inhomogeneous and annular. The newly introduced parameters of DNA and AgNOR are significant predictors of survival. Based on the most representative AgNOR and DNA characteristics related to survival, the PKI score was calculated. The CLLPD and B-CLL+V patients had a statistically significantly better prognosis when PKI was < 4. PKIs have confirmed the hypothesis that different prognostic subgroups could be identified within the homogeneous groups of neoplasms with relatively low malignancy (CLLPD and B-CLL+V).
    Analytical and quantitative cytology and histology / the International Academy of Cytology [and] American Society of Cytology 10/2009; 31(5):313-23. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    Diagnostic Cytopathology 09/2009; 37(10):780-2. · 1.49 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

217 Citations
99.74 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2005–2014
    • Klinička bolnica Dubrava
      Zagrabia, Grad Zagreb, Croatia
  • 2011
    • University of Cologne
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Medical University of Warsaw
      • Katedra i Klinika Hematologii Onkologii i Chorób Wewnętrznych
      Warsaw, Masovian Voivodeship, Poland
  • 2010
    • University of Zagreb
      • School of Medicine (MEF)
      Zagreb, Grad Zagreb, Croatia
  • 2001–2009
    • University Hospital Merkur
      Zagrabia, Grad Zagreb, Croatia