N Maruotti

Università degli studi di Foggia, Foggia, Apulia, Italy

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Publications (30)67.07 Total impact

  • Nicola Maruotti, Francesco Paolo Cantatore
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    ABSTRACT: In this review, we focus on the clinical and radiological aspects related to the biological therapy of ankylosing spondylitis (AS), axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA).
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 06/2014; · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: In the last years there is an increasing interest for the question of whether patients treated with antitumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) agents are at increased risk of infections. We aim to assess the possible role of anti-TNF-α treatment in the increase of the risk of infections in a population of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis. Methods: We analyzed data of patients affected by chronic arthritis treated with anti-TNF-α to investigate the risk of infections. Statistical analysis was done using STATA software. Results: The odds ratio for patients treated with anti-TNF-α who developed infections was 1.61 (CI: 0.88, 2.92, P<0.11). We found an odds ratio of 1.41 (CI: 0.74, 2.68, P<0.29) in patients treated with anti-TNF-α who developed urinary tract infection, and an odds ratio of 2.63 (CI: 0.31, 22.19, P<0.37) in patients treated with anti-TNF-α who developed herpes zoster. Discussion: These results seems to indicate a role of anti-TNF-α treatment in the risk of infection. Nevertheless, our results are not statistically significant probably because the sample sizes are too small and the time of observation among patients is variable. Moreover, other confounding factors may be gender, age and the different degrees of disease activity and comorbidity. In conclusion, limitations in the study size and design preclude definitive conclusions about the question of whether patients treated with anti-TNF-α agents are at increased risk of infections. The performance of additional research are needed to answer this question.
    Panminerva medica 03/2014; 56(1):31-4. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is a multistep process driven by a wide range of positive and negative regulatory factors. Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of this process. The degradation of ECM, occurring in response to an angiogenic stimulus, leads to degradation or partial modification of matrix molecules, release of soluble factors, and exposure of cryptic sites with pro- and/or antiangiogenic activity. ECM molecules and fragments, resulting from proteolysis, can also act directly as inflammatory stimuli, and this can explain the exacerbated angiogenesis that drives and maintains several inflammatory diseases. In this review we have summarized some of the more recent literature data concerning the molecular control of ECM in angiogenesis in both physiological and pathological conditions.
    BioMed Research International 01/2014; 2014:756078. · 2.71 Impact Factor
  • N Maruotti, A Corrado, F P Cantatore
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis and vasculitis are characterized by osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Inflammatory cytokines, glucocorticoid treatment, immobilization and reduced physical activity due to painful joints and muscle weakness are considered the main risk factors that cause low body mass density values in these diseases. Emerging evidence highlights the role of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-17, in the regulation of the bone homeostasis. In fact, chronic inflammation is often characterized by an imbalance between bone formation and bone resorption with a net prevalence of osteoclastogenesis, which is an important determinant of bone loss in rheumatic diseases.
    Reumatismo. 01/2014; 66(2):125-35.
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    ABSTRACT: A role for angiogenesis has been described in several rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, and osteoarthritis, leading to the possibility that angiogenesis inhibition may be an additional useful therapeutic arm. While the role of anti-angiogenic therapy in rheumatoid arthritis has received attention, it is conceivable that the inhibition of pathological angiogenesis may also be a useful therapeutical approach in other rheumatic diseases. Numerous compounds, such as, for example, various interleukins, antibodies directed against angiogenic factors, peptides, estrogen metabolites, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, have been found to have anti-angiogenic properties. However, additional research is needed to obtain a clear understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of angiogenesis and the potential applications of anti-angiogenic therapy in rheumatic diseases.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 11/2013; · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis plays a key role in several rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and vasculitides. An imbalance between angiogenic inducers and inhibitors seems to be a critical factor in pathogenesis of these diseases. Macrophages promote angiogenesis during rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, macrophages can produce a variety of pro-angiogenic factors that have been associated with the angiogenic response occurring during other rheumatic diseases. Lastly, macrophages could be a target in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to better elucidate the exact role of macrophage in angiogenesis in these diseases.
    Vascular cell. 06/2013; 5(1):11.
  • N Maruotti, A Corrado, A Neve, Fp Cantatore
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    ABSTRACT: Wnt signaling plays a key role in several physiological and pathological aspects. Even if Wnt signal was first described more than 20 years ago, its role in systemic effects, such as angiogenesis and vascular disorders, bone biology, autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases and neoplastic disorders, was only recently emerged through the use of animal and in vitro models. Moreover, Wnt signaling inhibitors, such as DKK-1, may be advantageously considered targets for the treatment of several diseases, including osteoporosis, vascular diseases, inflammatory diseases, neurological diseases and cancer. Nevertheless, further studies are required to provide a complete understanding of this complex signaling pathway, and especially of its role in human diseases, considering the possible advantageous effects of Wnt signaling inhibitors on the progression of disease conditions. J. Cell. Physiol. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Cellular Physiology 01/2013; · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biologic agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are able to reduce both disease activity and radiographic progression of joint disease. These drugs are directed against several proinflammatory cytokines (TNF α , IL-6, and IL-1) which are involved both in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and progression of joint structural damage and in systemic and local bone loss typically observed in RA. However, the role of biologic drugs in preventing bone loss in clinical practice has not yet clearly assessed. Many clinical studies showed a trend to a positive effect of biologic agents in preventing systemic bone loss observed in RA. Although the suppression of inflammation is the main goal in the treatment of RA and the anti-inflammatory effects of biologic drugs exert a positive effect on bone metabolism, the exact relationship between the prevention of bone loss and control of inflammation has not been clearly established, and if the available biologic drugs against TNF α , IL-1, and IL-6 can exert their effect on systemic and local bone loss also through a direct mechanism on bone cell metabolism is still to be clearly defined.
    Clinical and Developmental Immunology 01/2013; 2013:945945. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bisphosphonates are synthetic analogues of pyrophosphate usually used in treating bone disorders such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, fibrous dysplasia, hypercalcemia of malignancy, and inflammation-related bone loss. Though therapeutic effects of bisphosphonates depend primarily on their inhibitory effect on osteoclasts, increasing attention is being given to other effector cells, such as osteoblasts. This review focuses on the presumed effect of bisphosphonates on osteoblasts. A review of the literature was conducted to evaluate the pharmacodynamic effects of bisphosphonates including inhibition of osteoclasts and apoptosis of osteocytes and osteoblasts as well as their potential stimulatory effects on the proliferation of osteoblasts. Studies have demonstrated that bisphosphonates may stimulate proliferation of osteoblasts and inhibit apoptosis of osteocytes and osteoblasts. Considering that osteoblasts may be involved in bone disorders, such as osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and Paget's disease, and that bisphosphonates may stimulate proliferation of osteoblasts and inhibit apoptosis of osteocytes and osteoblasts, it is conceivable that a role for bisphosphonates exists in these diseases beyond merely the osteoclast influence.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 02/2012; 68(7):1013-8. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    N Maruotti, F P Cantatore, D Ribatti
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    ABSTRACT: Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic drug. Thalidomide exerts its effects by decreasing circulating CD4 positive T-cells and stimulating CD8 positive T-cells, by increasing the number of Natural Killer cells and T-helper 2 cells. Thalidomide also inhibits proliferation of stimulated T-cells and leukocyte chemotaxis. It modifies a number of integrin receptors and other leukocytic surface receptors and down-modulates cell-adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte migration. It has been demonstrated that thalidomide inhibits TNFalpha, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 production and increases production of IL-2, IL-10 and INFgamma. Moreover thalidomide plays an important role in inhibition of VEGF and FGF-2 mediated angiogenesis. Although the exact mechanism of action is not fully understood and only limited treatment opinions exist, thalidomide plays a role also in connective diseases and vasculities. Thalidomide has been seen efficacious in the treatment of cutaneous disorders in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and in mucocutaneous disease in Behcet's disease with a not dose-dependent response, even if it should be restricted to selected patients because of its important side effects.
    Reumatismo 09/2011; 58(3):187-90.
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    ABSTRACT: There is an emerging interest in the role of anti-TNF-α therapy in reducing bone damage in chronic arthritis with special regard to rheumatoid arthritis. Accumulation of osteoclasts in rheumatoid synovial tissues, and their activation due to osteoclastogenic cytokines and chemokines at cartilage erosion sites suggest that they may advantageously be considered as therapeutic targets. Given that the primary role of TNF-α in osteoclastogenesis, the inhibition of TNF-α represents an important strategy for reducing bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis. In point of fact, there is evidence that treatment with anti-TNF-α agents may avoid or reduce bone damage in rheumatoid arthritis, even if further studies are required to provide a biological explanation and a link for the observation of the advantageous effects of TNF-α inhibitors on the progression of bone damage in chronic arthritis. The existence of factors involved in osteoclast activation, including IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, IL-11, IL-17, M-CSF, TGF-β, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IP-10, MIG, and OSCAR, indicates that TNF-α is only a single player in the great molecular cauldron of osteoclastogenesis. The presence of mediators behind the TNF-α and RANK-RANKL complex that may be independent in inducing osteoclastogenesis, such as NFATc1, suggests that the anti-TNF-α therapy will not provide a complete reduction of bone damage in chronic arthritis.
    Internal and Emergency Medicine 02/2011; 7(1):15-20. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • N Maruotti, A Corrado, F P Cantatore
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years studies have emphasized the importance of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis as the second most common form of osteoporosis after postmenopausal osteoporosis. Several studies have underlined that glucocorticoids are responsible for decreasing bone mineral density and increasing bone fragility, resulting in a large increase in fracture risk. This review wants to provide a background regarding the fracture risk of patients exposed to glucocorticoid treatment, considering the fracture risk as the most appropriate parameter to valuate glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. In fact, glucocorticoid treatment induces bone loss and increases fracture risk above all affecting trabecular bone, probably through an alteration in bone turnover and microarchitectural changes responsible for an early increased fracture risk which is primary influenced by dose and duration of treatment, body mass index, age and female gender.
    Panminerva medica 12/2010; 52(4):339-43. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is emerging interest for osteoclasts as key players in the erosive and inflammatory events leading to joint destruction in chronic arthritis. In fact, chronic inflammatory joint diseases such as psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are often characterized by destruction of juxta-articular bone and erosions due to the elevated activity of osteoclasts, which are involved in bone resorption. The main step in inflammatory bone erosion is an imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation: osteoclast formation is enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-17 and is not balanced by increased activity of bone-forming osteoblasts. T-cells, stromal cells, and synoviocytes enhance osteoclast formation via expression of RANKL and, under pathologic conditions, of proinflammatory cytokines. In rheumatoid arthritis, accumulation of osteoclasts in synovial tissues and their activation associated with osteoclastogenic cytokines and chemokines at cartilage erosion sites suggest that they could be usefully selected as therapeutic target. In particular, in consideration of the primary role of RANKL and TNF-α in osteoclastogenesis, the control of the production of RANKL and the inhibition of TNF-α represent important strategies for reducing bone damage in this disease.
    Clinical and Experimental Medicine 11/2010; 11(3):137-45. · 2.83 Impact Factor
  • Nicola Maruotti, Francesco Paolo Cantatore
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence of the role of vitamin D in the regulation of T and B cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and keratinocytes continues to accumulate and provides a link between vitamin D and many autoimmune diseases, including Crohn's disease, juvenile diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Considering the influence of vitamin D on the immune system, it may have potential as a treatment for immune-mediated diseases, even if additional research is required to better quantify dosage. But the biggest obstacle to its clinical use is its potent hypercalcemic effect. The calcium status of the host may influence the effect of vitamin D on immunity.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 03/2010; 37(3):491-5. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the in vitro effect of the bisphosponate zoledronate on metabolic activity, proliferation and viability of human osteoblasts. Primary human osteoblasts cultures were obtained from cancellous bone of healthy subjects undergoing bone marrow biopsy. Cell cultures were treated with crescent concentrations of zoledronate (10⁻¹⁰to 10⁻³), with and without 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3. In these experimental conditions we evaluated cells viability and proliferation using the MMT colorimetric test, cell apoptosis by measurement of Caspase 3 activity and metabolic cell activity through alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production. Osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase synthesis was significantly enhanced by 10⁻¹⁰ M to 10⁻⁵ M zoledronate concentrations, whereas was dramatically decreased by higher drug concentrations. Vitamin D3 enhanced the positive metabolic effect of zoledronate. The effect of zoledronate on cell proliferation was variable and dose-dependent. While no effect was observed with lower drug concentrations (10⁻¹⁰ M to 10⁻⁸ M), zoledronate 10⁻⁷ M increased cell proliferation. Conversely, concentrations higher than 10⁻⁷ M significantly reduced cell proliferation, in a dose-dependent manner. Osteoblast apoptosis was enhanced after treatment with the highest zoledronate concentrations. The maximum positive effect on osteoblasts metabolic activity and proliferation was observed with the zoledronate concentrations corresponding to those theoretically reached in bone microenvironment when zoledronate is used in clinical practice for post-menopausal osteoporosis treatment. The results of this study confirm that bisphosphonates exert different cellular biochemical effects depending on dosage and support the hypothesis that their positive effect on bone mineral density could be partially due to an anabolic action on bone forming cells.
    Clinical and experimental rheumatology 01/2010; 28(6):873-9. · 2.66 Impact Factor
  • Bone 01/2010; 47. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In psoriatic arthritis, swelling and pitting oedema may be caused by different pathogenic mechanisms: on one hand, the involvement of tenosynovial structures; on the other hand, the involvement of lymphatic vessels, which may be rarely implicated by the inflammatory process. This different involvement is responsible for a different response to therapy and a different clinical outcome. In fact, patients with inflammation of the tenosynovial structures and normal lymphatic drainage have a more favourable clinical outcome and response to pharmacologic treatment, whilst patients affected by psoriatic arthritis with chronic lymphatic vascular damage are characterized usually by resistance of oedema to therapy. In this study, we report two cases of psoriatic arthritis with distal extremity swelling and pitting oedema. In the first patient, the swelling and pitting oedema were associated with lymphatic obstruction, as detected by lymphoscintigraphy. In the second, the predominant involvement of the tenosynovial structures, as shown by magnetic resonance, with normal lymphatic flow, may have been the cause of arthritis with oedema. These different pathogenetic mechanisms were associated with different response to therapy. Nevertheless, oedema was resistant to therapy in both patients probably because of other unknown factors, which influence therapy and clinical outcome.
    Rheumatology International 08/2009; 30(10):1367-70. · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Clinical Densitometry - J CLIN DENSITOM. 01/2009; 12(1):132-132.
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    ABSTRACT: In order to examine the effects of vitamin D on osteoblast function and to evaluate if osteoporotic and normal osteoblasts show a different behaviour in response to vitamin D, this report investigates the changes in osteocalcin production, after 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) stimulation of cultured osteoblasts derived from osteoporotic patients. Our results indicate an inadequate osteoblastic function in osteoporosis and demostrate that 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) can stimulate the metabolic activity of human osteoblasts in vitro. Considering that osteoporotic bone samples were representative of senile osteoporosis, our results may indicate a different metabolic phenotype in osteoporotic osteoblasts compared with normal osteoblasts. The increased osteocalcin production after 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) stimulation of osteoporotic osteoblasts suggests a reduced, but not absent, anabolic function in senile osteoporotic osteoblasts. The results of this study confirm the validity of vitamin D(3) to treat senile osteoporosis and suggest the need of higher vitamin D(3) intake in senile osteoporotic patients than in younger subjects.
    Rheumatology International 12/2008; 29(6):667-72. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of amino-bisphosphonate clodronate on endothelial cell functions involved in angiogenesis, namely proliferation and morphogenesis on matrigel were tested in vitro, whereas its effects on angiogenesis were studied in vivo. This was performed by using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. In vitro, clodronate inhibited the endothelial cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, peaking at 30 microM. At the same concentration, clodronate inhibited the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-induced capillary-like tube formation in the morphogenesis assay on matrigel. In vivo, when tested with the CAM assay, clodronate again displayed the capability to inhibit FGF-2-induced angiogenesis. Overall, these results suggest that antiangiogenesis by clodronate can be used to treat a wide spectrum of angiogenesis-dependent diseases, including certain chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer.
    Oncology Reports 06/2008; 19(5):1109-12. · 2.30 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

278 Citations
67.07 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • Università degli studi di Foggia
      • Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences
      Foggia, Apulia, Italy
  • 2007–2008
    • Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro
      • Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche ed Oncologia Umana (DIMO)
      Bari, Apulia, Italy