Naima Boughalleb

High Agronomic Institute of Chott Mariem, Tunis-Ville, Tūnis, Tunisia

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Publications (25)18.18 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fusarium wilt of melon, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis (Fom), is an important disease; races of the pathogen were identified by inoculating differential standard host cultivars. A total of ten isolates that were obtained from 23 fields located in four different geographical regions were identified as pathogenic. Results indicate that all four known Fom races, namely, 0, 1, 2 and 1.2, were found in north and middle Tunisia. Race 1.2 was the most prevalent.
    Phytoparasitica 12/2013; 41(5). DOI:10.1007/s12600-013-0321-1 · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three Monosporascus eutypoides-like isolates recovered from cucurbit plants with symptoms of Monosporascus root rot and vine decline in Tunisia were compared to 28 isolates of M. cannonballus from 12 countries for phenotypic, genomic, and pathogenicity characteristics. Morphologically, M. cannonballus and M. eutypoides-like cultures were similar, each producing fertile perithecia in culture containing globose, smooth, dark brown to black ascospores. Nevertheless, all M. cannonballus isolates had one ascospore per ascus, while M. eutypoides-like isolates had mainly two to three ascospores per ascus (rarely one). The employment of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA, the elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1 alpha), and the beta-tubulin (beta-tub) gene sequence diversity analyses and the resulting phylogenies identified a level of polymorphism that enabled separation of M. cannonballus and M. eutypoides-like isolates. All isolates of M. cannonballus had identical EF-1 alpha and beta-tub sequences irrespective of very diverse geographic origins, which were different from the EF-1 alpha and beta-tub sequences of the M. eutypoides-like isolates (96 and 97% similarity, respectively). Similar results were obtained for the ITS region of rDNA. In addition, of three M. eutypoides-like isolates tested for pathogenicity, all three were pathogenic on watermelon, two were pathogenic on muskmelon, but only one was pathogenic on cucumber. The results demonstrate that the M. eutypoides like isolates belong to the species M. eutypoides, and that M. cannonballus and M. eutypoides are distinct species.
    Plant Disease 06/2013; 97:737 - 743. DOI:10.1094/PDIS-05-12-0464-RE · 3.02 Impact Factor
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    Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment 01/2013; 17(1):20-26. · 0.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) infection on growth rate and the reproductive potential of Monosporascus cannonballus was studied in 21 isolates collected in cucurbit growing areas of Spain and Tunisia. The isolates were incubated on potato dextrose agar (PDA) under different conditions of temperature, pH, and water potential (Ψ(s)). They showed optimal growth temperatures over the range of 27-34°C and perithecia formation was obtained mainly at 25 and 30°C, although some isolates were able to produce perithecia at 35°C. All isolates were able to produce perithecia in a broad range of pHs (4-8). Regarding the effect of Ψ(s,) the isolates were more tolerant to grow on KCl than on NaCl. For each solute, radial growth decreased progressively as Ψ(s) decreased and was severely limited at -5.0 to -6.0MPa. Perithecia formation was highest at -0.5MPa, decreased at -1.0MPa and occurred just in some isolates at -2.0MPa. Nine of the M. cannonballus isolates harboured dsRNA with 2-6 bands each and a size range of 1.9-18.0Kb. Phenotypical data were subjected to multivariate factorial analysis. Most of the isolates clustered in two groups corresponding with the presence/absence of dsRNA elements. Isolates without detectable dsRNA produced more perithecia. However, isolates with dsRNA produced lower number of perithecia depending on the pH, Ψ(s,) or solute used. These results improve our understanding of the behaviour and growth of this pathogen in soil, and can be useful to implement effective disease control.
    Fungal Biology 03/2011; 115(3):236-44. DOI:10.1016/j.funbio.2010.12.007 · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The chemical composition of the volatile fractions obtained from distilled woody terminal branches and roots of Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl.) Masters was identified by Gas Chromatography- Flame ionization detectors (GC-FID) and Gas Chromatography-Coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Twenty compounds represented 83.7% of the essential oil from woody terminal branches and 29.2% from the roots. Nonan-1-ol was the main constituent present in the second fraction of the essential oil from woody terminal branches with the highest percentage of 75.22. Monoterpene hydrocarbons viz: α-terpinene (3.04), δ-carene (1.17) and β-ocimene (1.09) were the main compounds. In the fourth fraction of the essential oil from roots, the major compounds detected were Bornyl acetate (16.63), Camphene (1.59) and γ-cadinene (2.86). This fraction was mainly rich in oxygenate compounds (20.25) and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (6.84). Furthermore, the oils were tested for their antifungal activity against five phytopathogenic fungi. These oils from woody terminal branches and roots of T. articulata (Vahl.) Masters were found to possess antifungal activity.
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    ABSTRACT: Pythium indigoferae and Pythium irregulare, identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics, were isolated from necrotic roots, crown tissues and the rhizosphere of apple trees in Tunisia from 23 apple orchards in spring and autumn 2007–2009. The virulence assays on excised twigs, using different Pythium species isolated demonstrated that these oomycetes were pathogenic on the Anna, Lorka and Meski varieties and the MM106 rootstock. However, the biggest lesion area was noted on MM106 rootstock. Thus, it appeared that this rootstock is more susceptible to Pythium infections than Anna, Meski and Lorka apple varieties. Furthermore, it is important to note that in vitro tests showed that P. indigoferae seems to be more virulent than P. irregulare.
    Journal of Phytopathology 12/2010; 159(5):352 - 357. DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0434.2010.01772.x · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phallusides 1,2,3 (1), Fasciculatin (2), Acanthelline (3), Axisonitrile (4), Oroïdin (5) and the Novel bromopyrolimidazolic compound Axinellizine (6) were evaluated for their antifungal effects against several phytopatogenic fungi and were found to possess considerable activities. Insecticidal effect of only Acanthellin (3) against the major pest of stored products Tribolium confusum Duv has been carried out using direct contact application method showing a significant inhibitory effect of the test material on the T. confusum Duv larvae growth. Forty-five percent mortality of the adults was achieved 8 days after treatment.
    Comptes Rendus Chimie 11/2010; 13(11):1397-1400. DOI:10.1016/j.crci.2010.04.022 · 1.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chalkbrood is a highly contagious disease of the honey bee Apis mellifera caused by the heterothallic fungus known as Ascosphaera apis. The disease appears to be most prevalent in the spring when the brood area is increasing. Certain essential oils are known for their antibacterial and antifungal properties. In this study, a number of essential oils have been shown to be particularly effective in controlling the in vitro growth of A. apis. We tested nine essential oils using two in vitro methods, a direct contact method and a confrontation method. The essential oils used were: Lavandula angustifolia; Rosmarinus officinalis; Thymus vulgaris; Salvia officinalis; Mentha x piperita; Pelargonium graveolens; Prunus dulcis; Citrus aurantium; and Olea europaea. Thyme oil produced the best results, followed by the Pelargonium oil. The remaining essential oils were shown to have limited efficacy against A. apis in this in vitro test system, but may contribute to the enhancement of biological or integrated pest management strategies in apiculture.
    07/2010; 49(3). DOI:10.3896/IBRA.1.49.3.02
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    ABSTRACT: Evaluation of the Resistance of some Varieties of Biological Potato to the Mildew Phytophthora infestans. To control the mildew, in particular in biological productions, the varietal resistance of potato could be an advantage to associate with other cultural measurements. For this purpose, sixteen varieties potentially interesting in conventional and biological production were tested with regard to the mildew. Eleven varieties were subscribed in the list A (Alaska, Arinda, Baraka, Fabula, Liseta, Mondial, Platina, Safrane, Santana, Spunta and Timate) and five are in the process of evaluation (Carréra, Cicéro, Derby, Vivaldi, and Voyager). It seemed that the mildew affected all the tested varieties. However, some of them appeared more tolerant than others. Indeed, the Derby and Voyager varieties revealed to be able to delay the starting of the disease of one month. Cicéro, Vivaldi and Timate could delay the development of mildew disease of twelve days, relatively to its appearance on susceptible varieties. Furthermore, the foliar level of destruction remained very limited compared to that on susceptible varieties and not exceed 10% for Timate. The varieties Fabula, Liséta, Carréra, Mondial, Spunta, Platina, Safrane, Arinda, Santana and Baraka showed an early and fast starting of the epidemy. In addition, the tolerance or varietal resistance could not resolve the problem when tubers are affected, since a relatively weak rate of leaves contamination is enough to cause a very important economic loss on the tubers.
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    ABSTRACT: Bioactivity guided fractionation of Echiochilon fruticosum Desf. (Boraginaceae) butanolic extract biautography assay against fungi led to the isolation of a new bioactive alkaloid, named saoussanabiloïde (1). Its structure was established on the basis of spectroscopic measurements, IR, MS and 2D NMR using COSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments. The strongest inhibitory effect of the butanolic extract, from fractions derived from the crude extract and saoussanabiloïde (1), were observed against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum.
    Natural product research 11/2009; 23(16):1466-71. DOI:10.1080/14786410802267619 · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surveys of 11 watermelon fields throughout production areas of this crop in southern and central regions in Tunisia were conducted in 2007 to determine the aetiology and distribution of watermelon vine decline. Monosporascus cannonballus was isolated from diseased roots in all surveyed fields. All the isolates were identified according to morphological features and confirmed by amplification of a fragment of the ITS region with specific primers. Ascospores of M. cannonballus were recovered from soil in all watermelon fields surveyed and the average population densities ranged from 3.65 to 10.14 ascospores per g of soil. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that only four of the crop and soil factors evaluated had a significant correlation with ascospore density at the end of the growing season: vertisol vs. other soils, disease incidence, percentage of clay and pH. The pH of the soil showed a strong significant negative linear relationship with ascospore density, while the other three factors correlated positively.
    Journal of Phytopathology 06/2009; 158(3):137 - 142. DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0434.2009.01591.x · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nine plants belonging to Chenopodiaceae family were collected around salt marshes near Monastir, located in the east Mediterranean coast of Tunisia. They were tested for their antifungal activities against six plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum, F. solani f. sp. cucurbitae, Phytophthora cactorum, Rhizoctonia solani and Nattrassia mangiferae. Data of this study showed that the highest inhibition of Botrytis cinerea growth was observed with the petroleum ether extract of Atriplex inflata fruits (F) (24.5 mm). The in vitro growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. niveum was reduced only with A. inflata whole plant (WP) petroleum ether extract (32.3 mm). The most important inhibition zones were obtained against F. solani f. sp. cucurbitae with Atriplex semibaccata methanol and acetone extracts (34.7 and 31.0 mm, respectively). This work revealed that fungitoxic compounds were probably present in the petroleum ether extract obtained from A. portulacoides (WP), since it has suppressed the growth of F. s. cucurbitae. Our investigation proved that many Chenopodiaceae species adapted to saline soils may contain phytochemical compounds with fungicidal properties.
    Natural product research 06/2009; 23(11):988-97. DOI:10.1080/14786410802168494 · 1.23 Impact Factor
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    Asian Journal of Plant Pathology 01/2008; 2(1):24-29. DOI:10.3923/ajppaj.2008.24.29
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    ABSTRACT: The chemical composition of the volatiles isolated by steam distillation from leaves, flowers and fruits of Opuntia lindheimeri var. linguiformis L. Benson, leaves and flowers of Opuntia macrorhiza Engelm and leaves of Opuntia microdasys (Lehmann) gathered in the sea cliff of Monastir town (Tunisia), has been studied by GC and GC-MS. Remarkable differences were noted between the composition and the constituent percentage of the different studied organs. The most important compounds found in leaves, flowers and fruits of Opuntia lindheimeri var. linguiformis were tetradecanoic acid (3.15-13.57%), hexadecanoic acid (8.5-17.33%), butyl tetradecanoate (8.05-21.47%) and (E)-3-Butyldiene phthalide (6.92-15.77%). In the flowers volatile extract of Opuntia macrorhiza, the main compound found was Butyl tetradecanoate (21.14%). The volatile extract from Opuntia microdasys leaves was mainly rich in hexadecanoic acid (13.13%), (E)-3-Butyldiene phthalide (21.4%) and butyl tetradecanoate (5.91%). Volatile components extracts were tested against the fungi Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium solani f. sp cucurbitae, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp niveum, Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani. The strongest inhibitory effect of the all volatile extracts was observed against
    Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences 09/2007; 10(15):2485-9. DOI:10.3923/pjbs.2007.2485.2489
  • Plant Disease 04/2007; 91(4):468-468. DOI:10.1094/PDIS-91-4-0468B · 3.02 Impact Factor
  • N. Boughalleb, M. El Mahjoub
    Research Journal of Parasitology 01/2007; 2(1):32-38. DOI:10.3923/jp.2007.32.38
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    ABSTRACT: Des prospections ont été réalisées durant les mois d’Avril et de Mai dans certaines parcelles de blé situées au Nord de la Tunisie dans l’objectif d’identifier les espèces de Fusarium associées à la pourriture du collet et à l’échaudage des épis de blé. Les résultats ont montré que Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum et Microdochium nivale (Fusarium nivale) sont les plus fréquemment isolées. Leur gravité varie selon les régions. En effet, les champs localisés dans les gouvernorats de Béja, Jendouba et Bizerte ont montré l’existence principalement de six espèces de Fusarium: Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium solani, Microdochium nivale (Fusarium nivale) et Fusarium equiseti.
    Bulletin OEPP/EPPO Bulletin 12/2006; 36(3):512 - 516. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2338.2006.01051.x
  • N. Boughalleb, A. Moulahi, M. El Mahjoub
    International Journal of Agricultural Research 06/2006; 1(6):582-589. DOI:10.3923/ijar.2006.582.589
  • N. Boughalleb, M. El Mahjoub
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    ABSTRACT: Populations ofFusarium solani f.sp.cucurbitae (Fsc) andFusarium oxysporum f.sp.niveum (Fon) in naturally infested soil of watermelon fields were counted by the soil dilution method with subsequent pathogenicity tests. Inoculum density varied within the same region from one field to another, ranging between 9 and 1600 CFU g−1 soil forFsc and from 0 to 200 CFU g−1 soil forFon. Fusarium crown- and root-rot-diseased seedlings were observed in most soils (93%); however, Fusarium wilt was observed in only 34% of soil samples. The disease incidence on cv. ‘Giza’ (Y) increased significantly with inoculum density in the soil (X) (P<0.001). ForFsc, the relationship between inoculum density and disease incidence was characterized by the equation Y=0.0005X+0.165 (R2=0.67). ForFon, the equation was Y=0.003X−0.0014 (R2=0.88). Based on these equations, the estimated inoculum densities required to cause 50% disease incidence (DI50) on cv. Giza plants was 670 and 171 CFU g−1 soil forFsc andFon, respectively.
    Phytoparasitica 03/2006; 34(2):149-158. DOI:10.1007/BF02981315 · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    Boughalleb N, M. El Mahjoub
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we used direct incubation of watermelon dissected seeds on Komada`s selective medium for Fusarium spp. and incubation of entire seed on the same medium or on 2% agar medium. Identification of fungi was based on morphological criteria and also according to Koch`s postulate. Isolates from dissected seed were identified as F. oxysporum f. sp. niveum and F. solani f. sp. cucurbitae . These fungi were found to be externally and internally seed borne in watermelon. This is the first report of localization of Fusarium spp. transmitted by watermelon seeds in Tunisia.
    Plant Pathology Journal 02/2006; DOI:10.3923/ppj.2006.178.182