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Publications (4)0 Total impact

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    Nicolas Jones, Armelle Brun, Anne Boyer
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    ABSTRACT: Rating-scales have become a popular modality for expressing our preferences, but they present several drawbacks. We have recently proposed a new modality: comparing items ("I prefer A to B"). After initial user-studies with encouraging results, we here share some initial perspectives. In particular we examine three issues illustrated with graphs of user's preferences. We discuss the adaptability of comparisons, their algorithmic complexity and incoherences introduced by transitivity.
    International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. 01/2011;
  • Nicolas Jones, Armelle Brun, Anne Boyer
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    ABSTRACT: More and more personalization systems are emerging to reduce the information overload of the Web. As a result, it has become vital to model users' preferences accurately. Today, users are often brought to express their preferences through ratings on a multi-point scale. However, several studies have highlighted problems with ratings, such as inconsistency through time. The preferences collected are thus not totally reliable and the quality of the models may be limited. To cope with this limitation, we propose a new preference modality whereby users compare items two-by-two (“I prefer x to y”). We conduct two user-studies with 100 users on the domain of movies. This preliminary work on comparisons shows promising results. First, we reveal that users are in favor of this new preference mechanism. Second, we demonstrate that preferences expressed through comparisons are almost 20% more stable over time than those conveyed through ratings, thus more reliable.
    Sixth IEEE International Conference on Digital Information Management, ICDIM 2011, Melbourne, Australia, September 26-28, 2011; 01/2011
  • Nicolas Jones, Armelle Brun, Anne Boyer
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    ABSTRACT: More and more personalization systems are emerging to reduce the information overload of the Web. As a result, it has become vital to model users' preferences accurately. Our focus lies in the quality of users' expressed preferences, in terms of reliability and stability through time. Today, users are often brought to express their preferences through ratings on a multi-point scale. However, several studies have highlighted problems with ratings. We propose a new preference modality whereby users compare items two-by two ("I prefer x to y").This initial work on comparisons shows that users are in favor of this new preference mechanism and that comparisons are almost 20% more stable over time than those conveyed through ratings, thus more reliable. These encouraging findings let us think that comparisons may lead to a better user modeling and an increase in the quality of personalization services, such as recommender systems.
    Proceedings of the 2011 IEEE/WIC/ACM International Conference on Web Intelligence, WI 2011, Campus Scientifique de la Doua, Lyon, France, August 22-27, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: With the evolution of the Web, users are now encouraged to express their preferences on items. These are often conveyed through a rating value on a multi-point rating scale (for example from one to five). Ratings have however several known drawbacks, such as imprecision and inconsistency. We propose a new modality to express preferences: comparing items (“I prefer x to y”). In this initial work, we conduct two user-studies to understand the possible relevance of comparisons. This work shows that users are favorably predisposed to adopt this new modality. Moreover, it shows that preferences expressed as ratings are coherent with preferences expressed trough comparisons, and to some extent equivalent. As a proof of concept, a recommender is implemented using comparison data, where we show encouraging results when confronted to a classical rating-based recommender. As a consequence, asking users to express their preferences through comparisons, in place of ratings, is a promising new modality for preference-expression.
    E-Commerce and Web Technologies - 12th International Conference, EC-Web 2011, Toulouse, France, August 30 - September 1, 2011. Proceedings; 01/2011