Mehmet Bulbul

Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Dorylaeum, Eskişehir, Turkey

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Publications (17)13.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mineral content of sound dentin in primary teeth prepared using an Er:YAG laser at two different power settings. Thirty-six primary second molars were used in this study. Three dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth, and the slabs were randomly divided into three groups: Group A, control; Group B, Er:YAG laser at 3.5 W, 175 mJ, and 20 Hz, short pulse mode; and Group C, Er:YAG laser at 4 W, 200 mJ, and 20 Hz, medium-short pulse mode. One dentin slab per group was used to evaluate the dentinal morphology and surface roughness values using SEM and profilometer, respectively. Mineral content in the dentin slabs were calculated by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s HSD tests. No significant differences in Ca, K, Mg, Na, and P levels or Ca/P ratio were found among the groups . SEM micrographs showed that surface irregularities increased with a higher power setting. The surface roughness after laser treatment in Group B and Group C was found to be similar, unlike Group A.
    The Scientific World Journal 08/2014; · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Acrylic and bisacryl resins are widely used both during the temporization phase as well as for provisional restorations and the effect of external agents on dentin sensitivity can be reduced by the obliteration of the tubules. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate diffusion of methyl methacrylate monomer through dentin by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after three different desensitizing procedures during the fabrication of two different provisional crown materials. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted restoration and caries free human premolar teeth were used in this study. Thermoplastic vacuum formed material was used as a matrix to fabricate provisional restorations for each tooth before crown preparation. Teeth were prepared for a metal supported ceramic crown with 1 mm shoulder margins and then crown parts were separated from cementoenamel junction with a carborundum disk perpendicular to the long axis of the teeth. To the cementoenamel junction of each tooth a polypropylene chamber was attached that contains 1.5 cm 3 of deionized distilled water. Prepared teeth were divided into four groups ( n = 10) including control, desensitizing agent (DA) application, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd: YAG) laser irradiation (LI), and LI after DA application groups. After application of DA (except control) each group were divided into two subgroups for fabrication of provisional restorations ( n = 5). Two autopolymerizing provisional materials (Imident (Imicryl) and Systemp C and B (Ivoclar, vivadent)) were used to fabricate provisional restorations using the strips. Water elutes were analyzed by HPLC at 10 min and 24 h. Results: The monomer diffusion values varied statistically according to desensitizing procedures, provisional resin systems, and the time periods. Monomer diffusion through dentin surfaces desensitized with Nd: YAG LI after DA application was the lowest. Conclusions: Nd: YAG LI in association with DA application is an effective combination to eliminate monomer diffusion through dentin to pulpal chamber.
    Nigerian journal of clinical practice 07/2014; 17(4):407-12. · 0.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser (Nd:YAG) therapy and occlusal splints in patients with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) characterized with myofascial pain (MP). A total of 30 patients were selected after being diagnosed with MP according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TDM). The patients were divided into three groups. The first group was occlusal splint (OS) group A (n = 10), the second was low-level laser therapy (LLLT) group B (n = 10), and the last group C was placebo (n = 10). LLLT (1,064 nm, 8 j/cm(2), 250 mW, Fotona) was applied to the patients in the study group once a day for 10 days, for a total of ten sessions. The same parameters and application times were used for placebo group, but the patients were not irradiated. The application was on the trigger points. The patients in the OS group were instructed to wear occlusal splints 12 h/day for 3 weeks. Functional examination was based on RDC/TDM, and pressure pain values were obtained with the Visual Analog Scale. Comparisons were made between the groups before and after the treatment according to Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The pain score values decreased significantly after both LLLT (p < 0.05) and occlusal splint therapy (p < 0.05) compared to placebo group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between LLLT and OS groups after treatment (p > 0.05). OS and LLLT are effective for decreasing MP. In addition, this particular type of LLLT is as effective as occlusal splint for pain relief.
    Lasers in Medical Science 02/2014; · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of polishing procedures on the color stability of different types of composites after aging. Forty disk-shaped specimens (Ø10×2 mm) were prepared for each composite resin type (an ormocer, a packable, a nanohybrid, and a microhybrid) for a total of 160 specimens. Each composite group was divided into four subgroups according to polishing method (n=10): control (no finishing and polishing), polishing disk, polishing wheel, and glaze material. Color parameters (L*, a*, and b*) and surface roughness were measured before and after accelerated aging. Of the polishing methods, glazed specimens showed the lowest color change (∆E*), ∆L*, and ∆b* values (p<0.05). Of the composite resins, the microhybrid composite showed the lowest ∆E* value, whereas the ormocer showed the highest (p<0.05). For all composite types, the surface roughness of their control groups decreased after aging (p<0.05). In conclusion, all composite resins showed color changes after accelerated aging, with the use of glaze material resulting in the lowest color change.
    Dental Materials Journal 01/2013; 32(1):58-67. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the amount of change in color and color parameters of a composite resin (Filtek P60) polymerized by five different polymerization methods. A Teflon mold (6mm in diameter, 2mm in height) was used to prepare the composite resin discs (n=10). G1: Polymerization with inlay oven; G2: Polymerization with HQTH and autoclave; G3: Polymerization with LED and autoclave; G4: Polymerization with HQTH; G5: Polymerization with LED. Colorimetric values of the specimens before and after polymerization were measured using a spectrophotometer. The CIE L*a*b color system was used for the determination of color difference. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the data for significant differences. Tukey's HSD test and paired two-tailed tests were used to perform multiple comparisons (α=.05). There were no significant differences in total color change (ΔE*ab) among the polymerization groups (P>.05). However, the lowest color change (ΔE*ab) value was 3.3 in LED and autoclave; the highest color change (ΔE*ab) value was 4.6 in HQTH. For all groups, CIE L*, C*ab and a*values decreased after polymerization (P<.05). The highest Δb* and ΔC*ab values were observed in specimens polymerized in an inlay oven (P<.05). Composite resin material showed color changes above the clinically accepted value in all study groups (ΔE*ab⩾3.3). All specimens became darker during investigation (ΔL*< 0). Specimens polymerized with inlay oven presented the highest Δb* values which means less yellow color in specimens.
    European journal of dentistry 01/2013; 7(1):110-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The neodymium/yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd/YAG) laser has been suggested to repair broken prostheses in the mouth. This study investigated the effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding. Three intact human maxillary molars were prepared for full-veneer crown. For each tooth, dentin thicknesses in mesiobuccal cusp was 2, 3, or 4 mm. Twenty dies were duplicated from each of the prepared teeth. For metal copings with 0.5-mm thickness, wax patterns were prepared with dip wax technique directly onto each of dies. All patterns were sprued and invested. The castings were made using a nickel-chromium alloy (Nicromed Premium, Neodontics). A hole with 0.5-mm diameter was prepared on the mesiobuccal cusp of each crown. The Nd/YAG laser (9.85 W; 1 Hz repetition rate; fluence, 1.230 J/cm(2); Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona) was used for welding with or without air cooling (n = 10). The temperature rise was measured in pulpal chamber with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Differences between start and highest temperature reading were taken, and temperature rise values were compared using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests (α = .05). Pulpal temperature rise varied significantly depending on the dentin thickness and air cooling (p < 0.05). The non-air cooling group induced significantly the highest temperature increases. There were no significant differences between 2- and 3-mm dentin thicknesses groups (p > 0.05); however, pulpal temperature rise was the lowest for 4-mm dentin thickness group (p < 0.05). The highest values of thermal increase were found in the pulp chamber (6.8°C) when no air cooling was used in 2-mm dentin thickness group. Laser welding on base metal castings with Nd/YAG laser can be applied with air cooling to avoid temperature rises known to adversely affect pulpal health when dentin thickness is 2 or 3 mm.
    Lasers in Medical Science 05/2012; · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • A. SECILMIS, M. BULBUL, A. USUMEZ
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser has been suggested to repair broken prostheses in the mouth This study investigated the effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during Nd:YAG laser welding. Methods: Three intact human maxillary molars were prepared for full-veneer crown. For each tooth, dentin thickness in mesiopalatinal cusp was 2, 3 or 4 mm. Twenty dies were duplicated from each of prepared teeth. For metal copings with 0.5 mm thickness, wax patterns were prepared with deep-wax technique directly onto each of dies. All patterns were sprued and invested. The castings were made using a nickel-chromium alloy. A hole with 0.5 mm diameter was prepared on the mesiopalatinal cusp of each crown. The Nd:YAG laser (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona, 9.85 W; 1 Hz repetition rate, fluence: 1,230 J/cm2) was used for welding with or without air cooling (n=10). The temperature rise was measured in pulpal chamber with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Differences between start and highest temperature reading were taken and temperature rise values were compared using two way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Pulpal temperature rise varied significantly depending on the dentin thickness and air cooling (p<0.05). The non air cooling group induced significantly the highest temperature increases. There were no significant differences between 2 mm and 3 mm dentin thicknesses groups (p>0.05), however pulpal temperature rise was the lowest for 4 mm dentin thickness group (p<0.05). The highest values of thermal increase were found in the pulp chamber (6.8 C) when no air cooling was used in 2 mm dentin thickness group. Conclusions: Laser welding on base metal castings with Nd:YAG laser can be applied with air cooling to avoid adverse effects for the pulpal health in 2-3mm dentin thicknesses.
    45th Meeting of the Continental European Division of the International Association of Dental Research (CED-IADR) with the Scandinavian Division (NOF) 2011; 09/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the surface roughness of four different zirconium oxide ceramics. Methods: Four different sintered zirconium oxide ceramic specimens (Cercon, In-Ceram YZ, IPS e.max ZirCAD and Lava, 12 mm x 11 mm x 1 mm) were treated with (n = 4): (1) Neodymium:yttriumaluminiumgarnet (Nd:YAG) laser was applied with 300-m fiber probe at 3W, 20Hz, 150 mJ with 100s pulse duration after the graphite powder on the ceramic surface; (2) CoJet Sand sandblasting with silica powder (30 m particle size) at a pressure of 3.0 bar, distance of 10 mm, perpendicular to the treated surface for 20 s; (3) 9.5% HF acid etching for 90s; (4) no treatment. Ceramic specimens' surfaces were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) recording average surface roughness (Ra) measurements of the substrate. Four measurements were performed for each pre-treated ceramic specimen using a standardized rectangular spot. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The same discs were evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface topography analysis. Results: Significant changes in all zirconium oxide ceramic surfaces roughness occurred after laser irradiation (p<0.05). No differences in ceramic surfaces roughness occurred after any of the CoJet Sand and HF acid etching treatments compared to no treatment groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Nd:YAG laser irradiation resulted in an increase of surface roughness but the other surface texture parameters behaved similarly with no significant increase of Ra values. However, Nd:YAG laser irradiation induced cracking on the surfaces of all specimens, in addition to a blackening effect.
    45th Meeting of the Continental European Division of the International Association of Dental Research (CED-IADR) with the Scandinavian Division (NOF) 2011; 09/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Light curing based resins are extensively used in modern dentistry because they offer advantages, such as the ability to bond to the tooth structure and improved aesthetic characteristics. After polymerisation, there is a significant amount of organic compound residue unbound in the cured material. Post-cure heating of composite resin materials has recently become a popular restorative technique. With indirect composite polymerisation systems, an important perspective is the possibility of using post-polymerisation mechanisms associated with heat, pressure or high light intensity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro elution of monomers (Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, Bis-DMA and Bis-EMA) from one composite resin during two different time periods after different polymerisation methods with high performance liquid chromatography. In the current study, the polymerisation methods affected the monomer release. The Inlay System exhibited the lowest monomer release. Post-cure heat application in autoclave after polymerisation increased the amount of released monomers.
    Material Research Innovations 03/2011; 15(2):124-129. · 0.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments (air abrasion, acid etching, laser irradiation) on the surface roughness of a lithium-disilicate-based core ceramic. A total of 40 discs of lithium disilicate-based core ceramic (IPS Empress 2; Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) were prepared (10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10), and the following treatments were applied: air abrasion with alumina particles (50 μm), acid etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid, Nd:YAG laser irradiation (1 mm distance, 100 mJ, 20 Hz, 2 W) and Er:YAG laser irradiation (1 mm distance, 500 mJ, 20 Hz, 10 W). Following determination of surface roughness (R(a)) by profilometry, specimens were examined with atomic force microscopy. The data were analysed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). One-way ANOVA indicated that surface roughness following air abrasion was significantly different from the surface roughness following laser irradiation and acid etching (P < 0.001). The Tukey HSD test indicated that the air abrasion group had a significantly higher mean value of roughness (P < 0.05) than the other groups. No significant difference was found between the acid etching and laser irradiation (both Er:YAG and Nd:YAG) groups (P > 0.05). Air abrasion increased surface roughness of lithium disilicate-based core ceramic surfaces more effectively than acid-etching and laser irradiation.
    Lasers in Medical Science 11/2010; 27(2):267-72. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the temperature increase during the polymerization of a composite resin beneath acid-etched or laser-etched dentin discs. The irradiation of dentin with an Er:YAG laser may have a positive effect on the thermal conductivity of dentin. This technique has not been studied extensively. Forty dentin discs (5 mm in diameter and 0.5 or 1 mm in height) were prepared from extracted permanent third molars. These dentin discs were etched with 20% orthophosphoric acid or an Er:YAG laser, and were then placed on an apparatus developed to measure temperature increases. The composite resin was polymerized with a high-intensity quartz tungsten halogen (HQTH) or light-emitting diode unit (LED). The temperature increase was measured under the dentin disc with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Five measurements were made for each dentin disc, curing unit, and etching system combination. Differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings were taken, and the five calculated temperature changes were averaged to determine the value of the temperature increase. Statistical analysis was performed with a three-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests at a 0.05 level of significance. Further SEM examinations were performed. The temperature increase values varied significantly, depending on etching systems (p < 0.05), dentin thicknesses (p < 0.05), and curing units (p < 0.05). Temperature increases measured beneath laser-etched discs were significantly higher than those for acid-etched dentin discs (p < 0.05). The HQTH unit induced significantly higher temperature increases than the LED unit (p < 0.05). The LED unit induced the lowest temperature change (5.2°C) in the 1-mm, acid-etched dentin group. The HQTH unit induced the highest temperature change (10.4°C) for the 0.5-mm, laser-etched dentin group. The risk of heat-induced pulpal damage should be taken into consideration during the polymerization of composite resin after laser etching when the dentin thickness is less than 0.5 mm.
    Photomedicine and laser surgery 10/2010; 29(1):47-52. · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preheating on leaching of residual monomers (TEGDMA, Bis-GMA) from composite resin preheated to different temperatures. Methods: The composite resin material (Filtek P60, 3M ESPE) at room temperature or preheated to a temperature of 37, 54 or 68C using a chair-side preheating device (Calset thermal assist unit) were placed in a Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter2 mm in thick) and cured with light emitting diode unit for 20s. Seven specimens were prepared for each group. After curing, the specimens were immersed in distilled water for two different time periods (4 min and 24 h). The leaching of monomers from composite resin was analyzed by using high performance liquid chromatography. The data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests (p<.05) to evaluate the effect of time and preheating procedure on monomer leaching. Results: There were no statistically significant differences among time periods (p >.05). Leaching of TEGDMA was significantly higher than Bis-GMA (p <.05). Preheated composite demonstrated significantly less monomer leaching (p <.05) while there were no significant differences among 3 different preheating temperatures (p >.05). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study it can be concluded that the preheating of the test material photo-activation could be beneficial to achieve less monomer leaching and to avoid related negative effects.
    IADR General Session 2010; 07/2010
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate mineral content of dentin treated with different hypersensitivity treatments. Methods: The enamel of 10 lower wisdom teeth was removed to expose the dentin surface. Four dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth. Forty dentin slabs were divided into 4 groups of 10 each including control, Neodmium: yttrium aluminium garnet laser irradiation (Nd:YAG, Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona), desensitizing agent (Smartprotect, Detax) application, combination of laser irradiation and desensitizing agent application groups. The slabs in the Nd:YAG laser group were irradiated with 10 Hz, 1 W with 180 s pulse duration. Five slabs from each group underwent inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and mean percentage weights of the five elements [calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P)] in each slab were measured. The remaining 5 slabs were used for the detection of F- ion by means of fluoride ion-selective electrode. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests were used to analyze the data (a=05). Results: The dentin hypersensitivity treatments affected the mean percentage weight of Ca, K, Na (P<0.05) however there were no significant differences in Mg and P ratio in any group (P>0.05). The amount of F- was the highest in combination of laser irradiation and desensitizing agent application group and the lowest in control and laser irradiated specimens (P<0.05). Conclusions: Dentin hypersensitivity treatment affected the mineral content of dentin and Nd:YAG laser irradiation in association with desensitizing agent application is an effective combination in achieving the highest F- ion amount in dentin.
    IADR General Session 2010; 07/2010
  • M. BULBUL, A. SECILMIS, A. USUMEZ
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the color changes of resin cement materials polymerized beneath a simulated ceramic restoration (IPS Empress II, Ivoclar) by high-power LED polymerizing unit (Demi Led, Kerr). Methods: A pressable ceramic block (10 mm in diameter, 1 mm in height) was used as an interface between the polymerizing light tip and resin cement. Light-polymerized Variolink II (V-II-LP, Ivoclar), dual polymerized Variolink II (V-II-DP, Ivoclar), Multilink Automix (MA, Ivoclar), Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC, Kuraray), Panavia F 2.0 (PF, Kuraray), RelyX Veneer (RXV, 3M Espe), Nexus 3 (NX3, Kerr) specimens were polymerized by high-power LED unit for 20 seconds (n=10). Colorimetric values of the specimens before and after polymerization were measured using a spectrophotometer (Vita EasyShade, Ivoclar). The CIE L*a*b color system was used for the determination of the color difference. The total color differences (ΔE*ab) were calculated. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey HSD and paired t-tests were used to analyze the data (α=.05). Results: The L* values of ceramic system were affected by the polymerization of resin cements (before and after) (P<.01). The a* values were affected in all groups (P<.01), except for the RXV specimens (P=0.31). The b* values were affected in all groups (P<.01), except for the RXV (P=0.20) and V-II-DP specimens (P=0.09). There were significant differences among ΔE*ab values (P<.01). The V-II-LP specimens induced significantly the highest color changes (ΔE*ab=14.2) and RXV specimens induced the lowest (ΔE*ab=5.8). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it is concluded that light polymerization of resin cements is an important factor for the color of the final restorations.
    IADR General Session 2010; 07/2010
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    ABSTRACT: The peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a rare reactive exophytic lesion taking place on the gingiva and alveolar ridge usually as a result of local irritating factors such as trauma, tooth extraction, badly finished fillings, unstable dental prosthesis, plaque, calculus, chronic infections, and impacted food. This article presents 3 cases of PGCG that presented at the same location of the edentulous mandible of patients that using complete denture for over ten years.
    European journal of dentistry. 07/2010; 4(3):329-33.
  • Mehmet Bulbul, Bulent Kesim
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    ABSTRACT: Poor chemical bonding of acrylic resins to metal alloys can result in microleakage and failure of the bond. Metal primers have been shown to be effective in improving the bond strength of acrylic resins to metal alloys. However, there is insufficient information about their effects on bonding to different types of metals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers on the shear bond strength of acrylic resins to 3 different types of metals. A total of 432 disk-shaped wax patterns (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were cast in a Ti alloy (Tritan), base metal (Co-Cr alloy, Wironit), or noble metal (Au-Ag-Pt alloy, Mainbond EH). After casting, the disk surfaces were finished with abrasive paper under water. The noble alloy was airborne-particle abraded with 50-microm aluminum oxide; the other alloys were airborne-particle abraded with 110-mum aluminum oxide for 10 seconds. Specimens of each metal were divided into 3 groups (n=48) and received 1 of the following acrylic resins: (1) heat polymerized (Meliodent), (2) autopolymerized (Meliodent), or (3) microwave polymerized (Acron MC). The specimens were then divided into 4 subgroups (n=12) which received 1 of the following metal primers: (1) Metal Primer, (2) Alloy Primer, (3) Meta Fast, or (4) no primer (control). All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours after polymerization and then thermal cycled (5000 cycles at 5-55 degrees C with a 30-second dwell time). After thermal cycling, the specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in shear mode. Data (MPa) were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). The 3-way ANOVA indicated that shear bond strength (SBS) values varied according to the metal type, metal primer, and acrylic resin used (P<.001). The SBS between base metal and heat-polymerized resin with Metal Primer was the highest (3.6 +/-0.67 MPa), and the SBS between noble metal and acrylic resin, for all control groups, was the lowest (0.4 +/-0.07 MPa) (P<.001). For titanium, the highest SBS was observed for Meta Fast and the lowest for the control group. For base metal, the highest SBS was recorded for Metal Primer and the lowest for the control group, while for noble metal, the highest SBS was observed for Alloy Primer and the lowest for the control group (P<.001). The metal primers were associated with an increase in the adhesive bonding of acrylic resins to metal alloys. The SBS of the acrylic resin to the base metal alloy was significantly higher than the SBS to the noble and titanium alloys.
    The Journal of prosthetic dentistry 05/2010; 103(5):303-8. · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of three different provisional restoration materials on fibroblasts. Two bis-acrylic based [Tempofit Duomix (Detax), Protemp 3 Garant (3M ESPE)] and one urethan dimethacrylate [Revotek LC (GC Corporation)] based provisional restoration materials used. Materials were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions in standard teflon disks (2x5 mm) and four samples were extracted in 7 ml of Basal Medium Eagle with 10% new born calf serum and 100 mg/ml penicillin/streptomycin for 24 hours. The L929 fibroblast cells were plated (25.000 cells/ml) in well plates, and maintained in a CO(2) incubator at 37 degrees C for 24h. After 24 hours, the incubation medium was replaced by the immersed medium in which the samples were stored and the L929 fibroblasts were incubated in contact with eluates for 24 hours at 37 degrees C for 24h. The fibroblast cell viability was analyzed by measuring the mitochondrial activity with the methyltetrazolium test (MTT). Twelve well used for each specimen and experiment repeated for two times. The data was statistically analyzed by Mann-Whitney U tests. The results showed that, Revotek LC and Protemp 3 Garant were not cytotoxic for fibroblast cells when compared to control group (P>.05). However, Tempofit duomix was cytotoxic for L929 fibroblasts when compared to control group and other tested materials (P<.05). Taking into consideration the limitations of an in vitro study, our study indicate that provisional restoration materials might have cytotoxic effects on fibroblasts and should be selected carefully for clinical applications.
    European journal of dentistry 04/2009; 3(2):114-9.

Publication Stats

21 Citations
13.30 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Eskisehir Osmangazi University
      • Department of Prosthodontics
      Dorylaeum, Eskişehir, Turkey
  • 2009–2014
    • University of Gaziantep
      • Faculty of Dentistry
      Ayıntap, Gaziantep, Turkey
  • 2010
    • Selcuk University
      • Faculty of Dentistry
      Konya, Konya, Turkey