Markus Göker

Leibniz Institut DSMZ - Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH, Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany

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Publications (250)735.71 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A gamma radiation-resistant, Gram reaction-positive, aerobic and chemoorganotrophic actinobacterium, initially designated Geodermatophilus obscurus subsp. dictyosporus G-5T, was not validly named at the time of initial publication (1968). G-5T formed black-colored colonies on GYM agar. The optimal growth range was 25–35 °C, at pH 6.5–9.5 and in the absence of NaCl. Chemotaxonomic and molecular characteristics of the isolate matched those described for members of the genus Geodermatophilus. The DNA G + C content of the strain was 75.3 mol %. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diamino acid. The main polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one unspecified glycolipid; MK-9(H4) was the dominant menaquinone and galactose was detected as a diagnostic sugar. The major cellular fatty acids were branched-chain saturated acids, iso-C16:0 and iso-C15:0. The 16S rRNA gene showed 94.8–98.4 % sequence identity with the members of the genus Geodermatophilus. Based on phenotypic results and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G-5T is proposed to represent a novel species, Geodermatophilus dictyosporus and the type strain is G-5T (=DSM 43161T = CCUG 62970T = MTCC 11558T = ATCC 25080T = CBS 234.69T = IFO 13317T = KCC A-0154T = NBRC 13317T). The INSDC accession number is HF970584.
    Extremophiles 11/2014; · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A red-pigmented, Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic bacterial strain, designated No.164T, was isolated from sediment sample from the alkaline Lake Elmenteita located in the Kenyan Rift Valley. Results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the isolate belonged to the genus Belliella, with the highest sequence similarity (97%) to Belliella pelovolcani DSM 46698T. Optimal growth temperature was 30-35°C, at pH 7.0-12.0 in the presence of 0-4% (w/v) NaCl. Flexirubins were absent. The respiratory menaquinone (MK-7), predominant cellular fatty acids (iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0 and a mixture of C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) and DNA G + C content (38.1 mol%) of strain No.164T were consistent with those of other members of the genus Belliella. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, eight unspecified lipids and one unspecified phospholipid. Several phenotypic characteristics can be used to differentiate this isolate from those of other Belliella species. The polyphasic data presented in this study indicated that this isolate should be classified to represent a novel species in the genus Belliella. The name Belliella kenyensis sp. nov. is therefore proposed; the type strain is strain No.164T (= DSM 46651 = CECT 8551).
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology. 11/2014;
  • Benjamin Hofner, Luigi Boccuto, Markus Göker
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    ABSTRACT: Modern biotechnologies often result in high-dimensional data sets with much more variables than observations (n $\ll$ p). These data sets pose new challenges to statistical analysis: Variable selection becomes one of the most important tasks in this setting. We assess the recently proposed flexible framework for variable selection called stability selection. By the use of resampling procedures, stability selection adds a finite sample error control to high-dimensional variable selection procedures such as Lasso or boosting. We consider the combination of boosting and stability selection and present results from a detailed simulation study that provides insights into the usefulness of this combination. Limitations are discussed and guidance on the specification and tuning of stability selection is given. The interpretation of the used error bounds is elaborated and insights for practical data analysis are given. The results will be used to detect differentially expressed phenotype measurements in patients with autism spectrum disorders. All methods are implemented in the freely available R package stabs.
    11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Thermotoga thermarum Windberger et al. 1989 is a member to the genomically well charac-terized genus Thermotoga in the phylum 'Thermotogae'. T. thermarum is of interest for its origin from a continental solfataric spring vs. predominantly marine oil reservoirs of other members of the genus. The genome of strain LA3T also provides fresh data for the phylogenomic positioning of the (hyper-)thermophilic bacteria. T. thermarum strain LA3 T is the fourth sequenced genome of a type strain from the genus Thermotoga, and the sixth in the family Thermotogaceae to be formally described in a publication. Phylogenetic analyses do not reveal significant discrepancies between the current classification of the group, 16S rRNA gene data and whole-genome sequences. Nevertheless, T. thermarum significantly dif-fers from other Thermotoga species regarding its iron-sulfur cluster synthesis, as it contains only a minimal set of the necessary proteins. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,039,943 bp long chro-mosome with its 2,015 protein-coding and 51 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclo-pedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. Introduction Strain LA3 T (= DSM 5069 = NBRC 107925) is the type strain of the species Thermotoga thermarum [1], one out of currently nine species in the genus Thermotoga [2]. The genus name was derived from the Greek word thermê, heat, and the Latin word toga, Roman outer garment; Thermotoga,
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 08/2014; 9(3):1105-1117. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome sequence of the mud-dwelling archaeon Metano-planus limicola type strain (DSM 2279 T), reclassification of Methanoplanus petrolearius as Methanolacinia petrolearia and emended descriptions of the genera Methanoplanus and Methanolacinia Methanoplanus limicola Wildgruber et al. 1984 is a mesophilic methanogen that was isolated from a swamp composed of drilling waste near Naples, Italy, shortly after the Archaea were recognized as a separate domain of life. Methanoplanus is the type genus in the family Methanoplanaceae, a taxon that felt into disuse since modern 16S rRNA gene sequences-based taxonomy was established. Methanoplanus is now placed within the Methanomicrobiaceae, a family that is so far poorly characterized at the genome level. The only other type strain of the genus with a sequenced genome, Methanoplanus petrolearius SEBR 4847 T , turned out to be misclassified and required reclassification to Methanolacinia. Both, Methanoplanus and Methanolacinia, needed taxonomic emendations due to a signifi-cant deviation of the G+C content of their genomes from previously published (pre-genome-sequence era) values. Until now genome sequences were published for only four of the 33 species with validly published names in the Methanomicrobiaceae. Here we describe the fea-tures of M. limicola, together with the improved-high-quality draft genome sequence and annotation of the type strain, M3T. The 3,200,946 bp long chromosome (permanent draft sequence) with its 3,064 protein-coding and 65 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 08/2014; 9(3):1076-1088. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phaeobacter gallaeciensis CIP 105210(T) (= DSM 26640(T) = BS107(T)) is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter gallaeciensis. The genus Phaeobacter belongs to the marine Roseobacter group (Rhodobacteraceae, Alphaproteobacteria). Phaeobacter species are effective colonizers of marine surfaces, including frequent associations with eukaryotes. Strain BS107(T) was isolated from a rearing of the scallop Pecten maximus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, comprising eight circular replicons with a total of 4,448 genes. In addition to a high number of extrachromosomal replicons, the genome contains six genomic island and three putative prophage regions, as well as a hybrid between a plasmid and a circular phage. Phylogenomic analyses confirm previous results, which indicated that the originally reported P. gallaeciensis type-strain deposit DSM 17395 belongs to P. inhibens and that CIP 105210(T) (= DSM 26640(T)) is the sole genome-sequenced representative of P. gallaeciensis.
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 06/2014; 9(3):914-32. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Based on analyses of concatenated internal transcribed spacer regions of the nrDNA operon (ITS), large subunit rDNA (LSU), γ-actin and β-tubulin gene sequences the taxonomy of coniothyrium-like fungi belonging in the family Montagnulaceae, order Pleosporales, was re-assessed. Two new genera are proposed, Alloconiothyrium, to accommodate A. aptrootii sp. nov., and Dendrothyrium for D. longisporum sp. nov. and D. variisporum sp. nov. One new species is described in Paraconiothyrium, viz. Parac. archidendri sp. nov., while two species so far classified in Paraconiothyrium are transferred to Paraphaeosphaeria, viz. Paraph. minitans comb. nov. and Paraph. sporulosa comb. nov. In Paraphaeosphaeria five new species are described based on asexual morphs, viz. Paraph. arecacearum sp. nov., Paraph. neglecta sp. nov., Paraph. sardoa sp. nov., Paraph. verruculosa sp. nov., and Paraph. viridescens sp. nov. Macro- and micromorphological characteristics are fully described.
    Persoonia - Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi 06/2014; 32:25-51. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel non-motile, Gram-staining-negative, yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated CT348(T), isolated from the ectorhizosphere of an organic olive tree in Spain and characterised as an efficient plant growth promoting bacterium, was investigated to determine its taxonomic status. The isolate grew best in a temperature range of 5-35°C, at pH 5.0-8.0 and with 0-1% (w/v) NaCl. Chemotaxonomic and molecular characteristics of the isolate matched those described for members of the genus Chryseobacterium. The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 38.2mol%. The strain contained a polyamine pattern with sym-homospermidine as the major compound and produced flexirubin-type pigments. MK-6 was the dominant menaquinone and the major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0, C17:1ω9c, iso-C17:0 3-OH and iso-C15:0 2-OH. The main polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and several unidentified lipids and aminolipids. The 16S rRNA gene showed 92.2-97.8% sequence identity with the members of the genus Chyseobacterium. Based on the phenotypic traits and DNA-DNA hybridizations with the type strains of the most closely related species, the isolate is shown to represent a novel species, Chyseobacterium oleae, type strain CT348(T) (=DSM 25575 =CCUG 63020). Emended descriptions of the genus Chryseobacterium and C. daecheongense, C. gambrini, C. gleum, C. joostei, C. jejuense, C. luteum, C. shigense, C. taiwanense, C. ureilyticum and C. vrystaatense are also proposed.
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology 05/2014; · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter clade within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially in coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34T together with the genome sequence and annotation of DSM 24838T and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838T was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 03/2014; 9(3):855-865. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Salipiger mucosus Martinez-Cánovas et al. 2004 is the type species of the genus Salipiger, a moderately halophilic and exopolysaccharide-producing representative of the Roseobacter lineage within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Members of this family were shown to be the most abundant bacteria especially in coastal and polar waters, but were also found in microbial mats and sediments. Here we describe the features of S. mucosus strain A3T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 5,689,389 bp containing genome sequence consists of one chromosome and several extrachromosomal elements. It contains 5,650 protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes. The genome of S. mucosus A3T was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Center 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 03/2014; 9(3):1331-1343. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine ‘Roseobacter group’ were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 03/2014; 9(3). · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rubellimicrobium mesophilum Dastager et al. 2008 is a mesophilic and light reddish-pigmented representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the Roseobacter group play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles and were found in a broad variety of marine environments associated with algal blooms, different kinds of sediments, and surfaces of invertebrates and vertebrates. Roseobacters were shown to be widely distributed, especially within the total bacterial community found in coastal waters, as well as in mixed water layers of the open ocean. Here we describe the features of R. mesophilum strain MSL-20T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 19309T. The 4,927,676 bp genome sequence consists of one chromosome and probably one extrachromosomal element. It contains 5,082 protein-coding genes and 56 RNA genes. As previously reported, the G+C content is significantly different from the actual genome sequence-based G+C content and as the type strain tests positively for oxidase, the species description is emended accordingly. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 03/2014; 9(3):902-913. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The G+C content of a genome is frequently used in taxonomic descriptions of species and genera. In the past it has been determined using conventional, indirect methods, but it is nowadays reasonable to calculate the DNA G+C content directly from the increasingly available and affordable genome sequences. The expected increase in accuracy, however, might alter the way in which the G+C content is used for drawing taxonomic conclusions. We here re-estimate the literature assumption that the G+C content can vary up to 3-5 % within species using genomic datasets. The resulting G+C content differences are compared with DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) similarities calculated in silico using the GGDC web server, with 70 % similarity as the gold standard threshold for species boundaries. The results indicate that the G+C content, if computed from genome sequences, varies no more than 1 % within species. Statistical models based on larger differences alone can reject the hypothesis that two strains belong to the same species. Because DDH similarities between two non-type strains occur in the genomic datasets, we also examine to what extent and under which conditions such a similarity could be <70 % even though the similarity of either strain to a type strain was ≥70 %. In theory, their similarity could be as low as 50 %, whereas empirical data suggest a boundary closer (but not identical) to 70 %. However, it is shown that using a 50 % boundary would not affect the conclusions regarding the DNA G+C content. Hence, we suggest that discrepancies between G+C content data provided in species descriptions on the one hand and those recalculated after genome sequencing on the other hand ≥1 % are due to significant inaccuracies of the applied conventional methods and accordingly call for emendations of species descriptions.
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC AND EVOLUTIONARY MICROBIOLOGY 02/2014; 64(Pt 2):352-6. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leisingera nanhaiensis DSM 24252T is a Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped marine Alphaproteobacterium, isolated from sandy marine sediments. Here we present the non-contiguous genome sequence and annotation together with a summary of the organism's phenotypic features. The 4,948,550 bp long genome with its 4,832 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes consists of one chromosome and six extrachromosomal elements with lengths of 236 kb, 92 kb, 61 kb, 58 kb, 56 kb, and 35 kb, respectively. The analysis of the genome showed that DSM 24252T possesses all genes necessary for dissimilatory nitrite reduction, and the strain was shown to be facultatively anaerobic, a deviation from the original description that calls for an emendation of the species. Also present in the genome are genes coding for a putative prophage, for gene-transfer agents and for the utilization of methylated amines. Phylogenetic analysis and intergenomic distances indicate that L. nanhaiensis might not belong to the genus Leisingera.
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 01/2014; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel Gram-reaction-positive, aerobic actinobacterium, tolerant to mitomycin C, heavy metals, metalloids, hydrogen peroxide, desiccation, and ionizing-and UV-radiation, designated G18 T , was isolated from dolomitic marble collected from outcrops in Samara (Namibia). The growth range was 15–35 ∘ C, at pH 5.5–9.5 and in presence of 1% NaCl, forming greenish-black coloured colonies on GYM Streptomyces agar. Chemotaxonomic and molecular characteristics of the isolate matched those described for other representatives of the genus Geodermatophilus. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diaminoacid. The main phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and small amount of diphosphatidylglycerol. MK-9(H 4) was the dominant menaquinone and galactose was detected as diagnostic sugar. The major cellular fatty acids were branched-chain saturated acids iso-C 16:0 and iso-C 15:0 and the unsaturated C 17:1 íµí¼”8c and C 16:1 íµí¼”7c. The 16S rRNA gene showed 97.4–99.1% sequence identity with the other representatives of genus Geodermatophilus. Based on phenotypic results and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G18 T is proposed to represent a novel species, Geodermatophilus poikilotrophi. Type strain is G18 T (= DSM 44209 T = CCUG 63018 T). The INSDC accession number is HF970583. The novel R software package lethal was used to compute the lethal doses with confidence intervals resulting from tolerance experiments.
    BioMed Research International 01/2014; · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This manuscript calls for an international effort to generate a comprehensive catalog from genome sequences of all the archaeal and bacterial type strains.
    PLoS Biol. 01/2014; 12(8):e1001920.
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    ABSTRACT: Earlier phylogenetic analyses of the marine Rhodobacteraceae (class Alphaproteobacteria) genera Leisingera and Phaeobacter indicated that neither genus might be monophyletic. We here used phylogenetic reconstruction from genome-scale data, MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry analysis and a re-assessment of the phenotypic data from the literature to settle this matter, aiming at a reclassification of the two genera. Neither Phaeobacter nor Leisingera formed a clade in any of the phylogenetic analyses conducted. Rather, smaller monophyletic assemblages emerged, which were phenotypically more homogeneous, too. We thus propose the reclassification of Leisingera nanhaiensis as the type species of a new genus as Sedimentitalea nanhaiensis gen. nov., comb. nov., the reclassification of Phaeobacter arcticus and Phaeobacter leonis as Pseudophaeobacter arcticus gen. nov., comb. nov. and Pseudophaeobacter leonis comb. nov., and the reclassification of Phaeobacter aquaemixtae, Phaeobacter caeruleus, and Phaeobacter daeponensis as Leisingera aquaemixtae comb. nov., Leisingera caerulea comb. nov., and Leisingera daeponensis comb. nov. The genera Phaeobacter and Leisingera are accordingly emended.
    Frontiers in microbiology. 01/2014; 5:416.
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    ABSTRACT: Strain T5(T) is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter inhibens Martens et al. 2006, a secondary metabolite producing bacterium affiliated to the Roseobacter clade. Strain T5(T) was isolated from a water sample taken at the German Wadden Sea, southern North Sea. Here we describe the complete genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium with a special focus on the secondary metabolism and compare it with the genomes of the Phaeobacter inhibens strains DSM 17395 and DSM 24588 (2.10), selected because of the close phylogenetic relationship based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences of these three strains. The genome of strain T5(T) comprises 4,130,897 bp with 3.923 protein-coding genes and shows high similarities in genetic and genomic characteristics compared to P. inhibens DSM 17395 and DSM 24588 (2.10). Besides the chromosome, strain T5(T) possesses four plasmids, three of which show a high similarity to the plasmids of the strains DSM 17395 and DSM 24588 (2.10). Analysis of the fourth plasmid suggested horizontal gene transfer. Most of the genes on this plasmid are not present in the strains DSM 17395 and DSM 24588 (2.10) including a nitrous oxide reductase, which allows strain T5(T) a facultative anaerobic lifestyle. The G+C content was calculated from the genome sequence and differs significantly from the previously published value, thus warranting an emendation of the species description.
    Standards in Genomic Sciences 12/2013; 9(2):334-50. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel, gram reaction positive aerobic actinobacterium, designated G12(T), not validly named as Geodermatophilus obscurus subsp. amargosae, was accessed in the DSMZ open collection as DSM 46136(T). The optimal growth was at 2,535 °C, at pH 6.0-12.0 and in the absence of NaCl, forming greenish-black-coloured colonies on GYM agar. Chemotaxonomic and molecular characteristics of the isolate matched those described for members of the genus Geodermatophilus. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 73.0 mol%. The peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diamino acid. The main phospholipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and a small amount of phosphatidylglycerol; MK-9(H4) was the dominant menaquinone and galactose was detected as a diagnostic sugar. The major cellular fatty acid was branched-chain saturated acid iso-C15:0. The 16S rRNA gene showed 94.2-99.5 % sequence identity with the members of the genus Geodermatophilus. Based on the chemotaxonomic results and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain G12(T) is proposed to represent a novel species, Geodermatophilus amargosae. Type strain is G12(T) [=G96] (=DSM 46136(T) = CCUG 62971(T) = MTCC 11559(T) = ATCC 25081(T) = JCM 3153(T) = NBRC 13316(T) = NRRL B-3578(T) = KCTC 9360(T)). The INSDC accession number is HF679056.
    Current Microbiology 11/2013; · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The marine genus Phaeobacter currently comprises six species, some of which were intensively studied mainly due to their ability to produce secondary metabolites. The type strain of the type species, Phaeobacter gallaeciensis BS107(T), has been deposited at several public culture collections worldwide. Based on differences in plasmid profiles, we detected that the alleged P. gallaeciensis type strains deposited at the Collection Institute Pasteur (CIP; Paris, France) as CIP 105210 and at the German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ; Braunschweig, Germany) as DSM 17395 are not identical. To determine the identity of these strains, we conducted DNA-DNA hybridization, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF), 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analyses, as well as physiological experiments. Based on the detailed 16S rRNA gene reanalysis we showed that strain CIP 105210 most likely corresponds to the original P. gallaeciensis type strain BS107(T). In contrast, the Phaeobacter strain DSM 17395 exhibits a much closer affiliation to Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 16374(T) ( = T5(T)) and should thus be allocated to this species. The detection of the dissimilarity of strains CIP 105210(T) and DSM 17395 will influence future comparative studies within the genus Phaeobacter.
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC AND EVOLUTIONARY MICROBIOLOGY 11/2013; 63(Pt 11):4340-9. · 2.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
735.71 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • Leibniz Institut DSMZ - Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH
      Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 2013
    • CBS Fungal Biodiversity Centre - Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
    • Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
      Nairoba, Nairobi Area, Kenya
  • 2012–2013
    • Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
      Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany
    • DOE Joint Genome Institute
      Walnut Creek, California, United States
    • University of Queensland 
      • School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • 2011–2013
    • University of Tehran
      • School of Biology
      Teheran, Tehrān, Iran
  • 2005–2009
    • University of Tuebingen
      • • Center for Bioinformatics
      • • Institute of Evolution and Ecology
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2008
    • University of Tennessee
      • Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology
      Knoxville, TN, United States
    • Spanish National Research Council
      • Departamento de Geología
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2007
    • École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
      • Faculté Informatique et Communications
      Lausanne, VD, Switzerland
  • 2006
    • Hohenheim University
      • Institute of Botany
      Stuttgart, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
  • 2002–2004
    • University of Vienna
      • Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany
      Vienna, Vienna, Austria