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Publications (5)0 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: From October 2005 to September 2006, we collected the specimen from 366 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 12 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 411 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, 406 strains were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 70, Streptococcus pneumoniae 85, Haemophilus influenzae 78, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 46, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 14, Klebsiella pneumoniae 21, and Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis 40. Of 70 S. aureus strains, those with 2 microg/ml or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 microg/ml or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 38 (54.3%) and 32 (45.7%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of 37 strains (97.4%) at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Against MRSA, arbekacin and vancomycin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 microg/ml. Carbapenems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and in particular, panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25 microg/ml. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: over 128 microg/ml) for erythromycin (38.1%) and clindamycin (22.6%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 microg/ml or less. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 0.5 microg/ml. Against P. aeruginosa (non-mucoid), arbekacin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 8 microg/ml. Against K. pneumoniae, cefozopran was the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Also, all the antibacterial agents except ampicillin generally showed a potent activity against M. (B.) catarrhalis and the MIC90 of them were 2 microg/ml or less. The approximately half the number (53.6%) of the patients with respiratory infection were aged 70 years or older. Bacterial pneumonia and chronic bronchitis accounted for 44.3% and 29.8% of all the respiratory infection, respectively. The bacteria frequently isolated from the patients with bacterial pneumonia were S. aureus (15.4%), S. pneumoniae (23.4%), and H. influenzae (21.3%). S. aureus (25.4%) and S. pneumoniae (18.0%) also were frequently isolated from the patients with chronic bronchitis. Before the drug administration, the bacteria frequently isolated from the patients were S. pneumoniae (22.0%) and H. influenzae (21.4%). The bacteria frequently isolated from the patients treated with macrolides were S. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa, and their isolation frequencies were each 35.3%.
    The Japanese journal of antibiotics 09/2008; 61(4):209-40.
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    ABSTRACT: From October 2004 to September 2005, we collected the specimen from 319 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 12 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 383 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in inflammation, 381 strains were examined. The breakdown of the isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 87, Streptococcus pneumoniae 80, Haemophilus influenzae 78, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 35, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 9, Klebsiella pneumoniae 15, Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis 30, etc. Of 87 S. aureus strains, those with 2 microg/mL or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 microg/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 40 (46.0%) and 47 (54.0%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/mL. Against MRSA, vancomycin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 microg/mL. Arbekacin (ABK) also showed the potent activity and its MIC90 was 2 microg/mL. Carbapenems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25-0.5 microg/mL. Cefozopran (CZOP) also had a preferable activity (MIC90: 1 microg/mL) and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 microg/mL. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: 128 microg/mL or more) for ABK (2.5%), erythromycin (37.5%), and clindamycin (38.8%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 microg/mL. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 microg/mL. Against P. aeruginosa (non-mucoid), amikacin (AMK) had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 4 microg/mL. The activity of CZOP against the non-mucoid type also was preferable and its MIC90 was 8 microg/mL. Against K. pneumoniae, CZOP, cefmenoxime, cefpirome, flomoxef were the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/mL. Also, all the agents generally showed a potent activity against M. (B.) catarrhalis and the MIC90 of them were 4 microg/mL or less. The approximately half the number (57.0%) of the patients with respiratory infection were aged 70 years or older. Bacterial pneumonia and chronic bronchitis accounted for 50.8% and 23.8% of all the respiratory infection, respectively. The bacteria frequently isolated from the patients with bacterial pneumonia were S. aureus (21.6%), S. pneumoniae (24.7%) and H. influenzae (20.1%). S. aureus (20.9%), S. pneumoniae (16.1%), and H. influenzae (16.1%) also were relatively frequently isolated from the patients with chronic bronchitis. Before the drug administration, the bacteria frequently isolated from the patients were S. pneumoniae (22.3%) and H. influenzae (25.1%). The bacteria relatively frequently isolated from the patients treated with macrolides were P. aeruginosa and the isolation frequency was 43.5%.
    The Japanese journal of antibiotics 11/2006; 59(5):323-54.
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    ABSTRACT: From October 2003 to September 2004, we collected the specimen from 399 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 12 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 474 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in inflammation, 469 strains were examined. The breakdown of the isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 76, Streptococcus pneumoniae 81, Haemophilus influenzae 84, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 56, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 11, Klebsiella pneumoniae 36, Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis 24, etc. Of 76 S. aureus strains, those with 2 microg/ml or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 microg/ml or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were both 38 strains (50.0%). Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/mL. Against MRSA, vancomycin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 microg/mL. Arbekacin also showed the potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 4 microg/mL. Carbapenems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125-0.5 microg/mL. Cefozopran (CZOP) also had a preferable activity (MIC90:2 microg/ mL) and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 4 microg/mL. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: 128 microg/mL or more) for cefaclor (11.1%), erythromycin (43.2%), and clindamycin (40.7%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of 83 of all the strains (98.8%) at 0.063 microg/mL. Tobramycin showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (both mucoid and non-mucoid) and its MIC90 was 2 microg/mL. The activity of CZOP also was preferable and its MIC90 was 4 microg/mL for the mucoid-type and 8 microg/mL for the non-mucoid type. CZOP was the most potent activities against K. pneumoniae and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 microg/mL. Also, all the agents generally showed potent activities against M. (B.) catarrhalis and the MIC90 of them were 4 microg/mL or less. The approximately half the number (54.1%) of the patients with respiratory infection were aged 70 years or older. Bacterial pneumonia and chronic bronchitis accounted for 46.1% and 30.6% of all the respiratory infection, respectively. The bacteria frequently isolated from the patients with bacterial pneumonia were S. aureus (18.6%) and H. influenzae (18.1%). In contrast, S. aureus (16.9%) and S. pneumoniae (14.9%) were frequently isolated from the patients with chronic bronchitis. Before the drug administration, the bacteria frequently isolated from the patients were S. pneumoniae (20.6%) and H. influenzae (21.5%). The bacteria relatively frequently isolated from the patients treated with cephems or macrolides were P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus was relatively frequently isolated from the patients treated with quinolones.
    The Japanese journal of antibiotics 07/2005; 58(3):326-58.
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    ABSTRACT: From October 2002 to September 2003, we collected the specimen from 476 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 16 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 584 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in inflammation, 578 strains were examined. The breakdown of the isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 77, Streptococcus pneumoniae 103, Haemophilus influenzae 95, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 61, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 23, Klebsiella pneumoniae 36, Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis 29, etc. Of 77 S. aureus strains, those with 2 microg/ml or less of MIC of oxacillin (MPIPC) [methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA] was 34 strains (44.2%) and those with 4 microg/ml or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) was 43 strains (55.8%). Against MSSA, imipenem (IPM) and minocycline (MINO) had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25 microg/ml. Although clindamycin (CLDM) and aminoglycosides also had the potent activity, the resistant strains against those agents were detected. Cefotiam (CTM) inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 microg/ml without the low sensitive strains. Against MRSA, vancomycin (VCM) showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 microg/ml. Arbekacin (ABK) also showed the relatively potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 4 microg/ml. Carbapenems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25-0.5 microg/ml. Cefozopran (CZOP) also had a preferable activity (MIC90: 1 microg/ml) and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 microg/ml. In contrast, the resistant strains for cefaclor (CCL), erythromycin (EM), CLDM, and tetracycline (TC) were detected in 50.5%, 76.7%, 50.5%, and 80.6% of all the strains, respectively. Against H. influenzae, LVFX showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of 92 of all the strains (96.8%) at 0.063 microg/ml. Tobramycin (TOB) showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (both mucoid and non-mucoid) and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 microg/ml. The antibacterial activity of CZOP was good and its MIC90 against mucoid and non-mucoid strains was 8 and 16 microg/ml, respectively. CZOP and cefpirome (CPR) were the most potent against K. pneumoniae with 0.125 microg/ml of MIC90. Also, all the agents generally showed potent activities against M. (B.) catarrhalis and the MIC90 of all drugs were 4 microg/ml or less. The approximately half the number (47.5%) of the patients with respiratory infection were aged 70 years or older. As for the incidence by the diseases, bacterial pneumonia and chronic bronchitis were the highest, being noted in 35.7 and 33.8% of all the patients, respectively. The bacteria frequently isolated from the patients with bacterial pneumonia were S. pneumoniae (22.6%). In contrast, S. aureus (16.6%) and P. aeruginosa (13.7%) were relatively frequently isolated from the patients with chronic bronchitis. Before the drug administration, the bacteria frequently isolated from all the patients were H. influenzae (24.5%) and S. pneumoniae (24.2%). In comparison of the isolated bacteria by pretreatment agents, P. aeruginosa was relatively frequently isolated from the patients pretreated with cephems or macrolides and H. influenzae was relatively frequently isolated from the patients pretreated with penicillins.
    The Japanese journal of antibiotics 07/2004; 57(3):213-45.
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    ABSTRACT: From October 2001 to September 2002, we collected the specimen from 370 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 16 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of the isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and antibiotics and patients' characteristics. Of 458 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in inflammation, 456 strains were investigated. The breakdown of the isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 69, Streptococcus pneumoniae 72, Haemophilus influenzae 85, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 44, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 13, Klebsiella pneumoniae 32, Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis 32, and others. Of 69 S. aureus strains, those with 4 micrograms/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) occupied 43.5%. Vancomycin and arbekacin showed the most potent activities against MRSA as observed in 2000. The frequency of S. pneumoniae exhibiting low sensitivity to penicillin (penicillin-intermediate S. pneumoniae: PISP + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae: PRSP) was 59.7% and both rates of PISP and PRSP were the highest after 1992. Carbapenems had strong activities against S. pneumoniae. Especially, panipenem and imipenem inhibited the growth of all 72 strains at 0.125 and 0.5 microgram/mL, respectively. Generally, all drugs had strong activities against H. influenzae with MIC90s of 16 micrograms/mL or less. The drug that had the strongest activity against H. influenzae was levofloxacin, which inhibited the growth of 80 of the 85 strains at 0.063 microgram/mL. Against P. aeruginosa mucoid strain, meropenem had a strong activity with MIC90 of 0.5 microgram/mL while, against non-mucoid strain, tobramycin had a strong activity with MIC90 of 2 micrograms/mL. K. pneumoniae showed good susceptibilities to all drugs except ampicillin and minocycline, and the MIC90s were 4 micrograms/mL or less. Particularly, cefmenoxime, cefpirome, and imipenem had the strongest activity (MIC90: 0.125 microgram/mL), and cefozopran had a strong activity, inhibiting the growth of all strains at 0.25 microgram/mL. Also, all drugs generally had strong activities against M. (B.) catarrhalis. MIC90s of all drugs were 4 micrograms/mL or less. The drug that had the strongest activity was minocycline and levofloxacin inhibiting all 32 strains at 0.063 microgram/mL. Most of the patients with respiratory infection were aged 70 years or older, accounting for approximately a half of the total (40.5%). As for the incidence by the diseases, bacterial pneumonia and chronic bronchitis were the highest, being noted in 39.2% and 37.3% of all the patients, respectively. The bacteria frequently isolated from the patients with bacterial pneumonia were S. aureus (19.3%) and S. pneumoniae (19.9%). In contrast, H. influenzae (22.0%) were frequently isolated from the patients with chronic bronchitis. Before the drug administration, the bacteria frequently isolated from the patients were S. pneumoniae (20.8%) and H. influenzae (21.5%). S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae decreased after the initiation of drug administration while S. aureus increased. The isolation frequency of P. aeruginosa was higher after than before the initiation of drug administration. The bacteria were frequently isolated from the patients who had already treated with cephems were S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. From the patients who had already treated with macrolides, S. pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated while S. aureus was the most frequently isolated from the patients pre-treated with quinolones.
    The Japanese journal of antibiotics 11/2003; 56(5):365-95.