Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan

Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, United States

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Publications (21)29.92 Total impact

  • Lisa Danielle Grunebaum · Jennifer Murdock · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Leslie S Baumann
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effects of the aroma of essential oil of lavender against placebo on subjects' pain perceptions and levels of anxiety when undergoing elective cosmetic facial injections of botulinum toxin type A (BOTOX(®) COSMETIC) for the correction of glabellar wrinkles. Subjects (N=30) who had not previously received any cosmetic facial injections were randomized to essential oil of lavender aroma exposure or to placebo during elective cosmetic facial injections of BOTOX(®) (12 U) for the correction of glabellar wrinkles. Evaluations of subjects' pain perceptions and levels of anxiety assessed by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at baseline, before, and after injections. Subjects exposed to essential lavender oil showed a significant reduction in HR after the injection as compared to the pre-injection HR. Subjects exposed to the placebo did not show any significant difference in BP or HR between pre-injection and postinjection. Although essential oil of lavender did not have an effect on the subjects' perception of pain during a facial injection, subjects showed significant increases in parasympathetic activity when exposed to the lavender aroma. Lavender aromatherapy has the potential to ease anxiety in patients undergoing minimally invasive facial cosmetic procedures.
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology 06/2011; 10(2):89-93. DOI:10.1111/j.1473-2165.2011.00554.x · 1.00 Impact Factor
  • M. P. Castanedo-Tardan · C. Matiz · S. E. Jacob
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    ABSTRACT: In the not so distant past, in the United States contact dermatitis was considered to be a condition that affected mainly adults. The diagnosis was certainly less often rendered in pediatrics, mainly because it was believed that a child's immune system was immature and that children were generally exposed to fewer allergens. With this in mind, we can attribute the low prevalence formerly reported for this disease partly to the fact that most affected children were not (and are still not) evaluated using appropriate skin tests. Patch testing in children requires certain modifications, but the international literature of the last decade and US data published in the past year indicate that contact dermatitis is a common condition in the pediatric population and that the prevalence is similar in children and adults.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2011; 102(1):8-18. DOI:10.1016/j.ad.2009.12.028
  • M P Castanedo-Tardan · C Matiz · S E Jacob
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    ABSTRACT: In the not so distant past, in the United States contact dermatitis was considered to be a condition that affected mainly adults. The diagnosis was certainly less often rendered in pediatrics, mainly because it was believed that a child's immune system was immature and that children were generally exposed to fewer allergens. With this in mind, we can attribute the low prevalence formerly reported for this disease partly to the fact that most affected children were not (and are still not) evaluated using appropriate skin tests. Patch testing in children requires certain modifications, but the international literature of the last decade and US data published in the past year indicate that contact dermatitis is a common condition in the pediatric population and that the prevalence is similar in children and adults.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2011; 102(1):8-18. DOI:10.1016/S1578-2190(11)70747-8
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    ABSTRACT: Upon ingestion, the artificial sweetener, aspartame is metabolized to formaldehyde in the body and has been reportedly associated with systemic contact dermatitis in patients exquisitely sensitive to formaldehyde. We present a case of a 9-year-old Caucasian boy with a history of mild atopic dermatitis that experienced severe systematized dermatitis after being started on montelukast chewable tablets containing aspartame. Patch testing revealed multiple chemical sensitivities which included a positive reaction to formaldehyde. Notably, resolution of his systemic dermatitis only occurred with discontinuation of the montelukast chewables.
    Pediatric Dermatology 11/2009; 26(6):739-43. DOI:10.1111/j.1525-1470.2008.00855.x · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • C Matiz · J W Hsu · M Paz Castanedo-Tardan · S E Jacob
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    ABSTRACT: In the recent past in the United States, allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) was thought to be a disorder affecting mainly adults. It was rarely diagnosed in the pediatric population, partly due to beliefs that children had immature immune systems and were less frequently exposed to chemical allergens when compared to adults. Also, patch testing for affected children was not as widely utilized in the pediatric population as it is today. While patch testing in children may require some modifications to the technique, the international (non-US) data from the last decade in addition to the US data reported this past year indicate that ACD in children is an increasingly common condition, equally prevalent and relevant to adults. According to our review of the international data available on pediatric patch testing, the top five global allergens were found to be nickel, cobalt, antibiotics, fragrances, and rubber chemicals. Although these allergens display a relatively consistent prevalence rate across the world, disparities can be attributed to regional variations in local trends, customs, and fashions. In this review pediatric patch test results from countries throughout the globe have been compared while focusing on geographic differences on some of the most common contact allergens that affect children worldwide.
    Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia 10/2009; 144(5):541-56. · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Maria Paz Castanedo · Leslie Baumann
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    ABSTRACT: One of the most controversial topics surrounding the practice of dermatology is in-office dispensing of nonprescription skin care products by dermatologists. The controversy is not new, with legitimate arguments debated for and against it. The ongoing debate will continue, emotionally charged and with sharply demarcated battle lines, but without the promise of ever reaching a consensus. Regardless of one's position, the objective is to develop strategies to improve the practice of dermatology and the welfare of patients.
    Clinics in dermatology 09/2009; 27(4):355-8. DOI:10.1016/j.clindermatol.2009.02.007 · 1.93 Impact Factor
  • Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Kathryn A Zug
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    ABSTRACT: Certain patterns of dermatitis, such as those affecting the face, eyelids, lips, and neck, should raise the suspicion of a cosmetic-related contact allergy. Patch testing with a broad screening series, supplemented by a patient's own personal care products, should be considered when evaluating patients with suspected cosmetic dermatitis. Once the offending allergen is identified, an avoidance regimen should be established to avoid further exposure.
    Dermatologic clinics 08/2009; 27(3):265-80, vi. DOI:10.1016/j.det.2009.05.014 · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • Sharon E Jacob · Mohamed L Elsaie · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Sarah Stechschulte · Joely Kaufman
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    ABSTRACT: As the population continues to age, understanding the differences between aged and young skin becomes more important to the clinician. Contact dermatitis is just one of the clinical entities that presents differently in the geriatric population. Reactions can be delayed in onset, and prolonged in duration. These altered presentations are the direct result of the pathophysiologic changes that occur in aging skin. It is especially important to recognize contact dermatitis in this age group, and to treat in a timely fashion.
    Current Aging Science 07/2009; 2(2):121-6. DOI:10.2174/1874609810902020121
  • Sharon E Jacob · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tarden
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) reactions to fragrances may present in a variety of ways because of exposure to these allergens from a wide range of sources. We describe a diagnostic pearl for this common ACD, primarily seen overlying the prominentia laryngea (Adam's apple) both in women and girls, which we have called the atomizer sign.
    Cutis; cutaneous medicine for the practitioner 12/2008; 82(5):317-8. · 0.59 Impact Factor
  • Sharon E Jacob · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Marianna L Blyumin
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    ABSTRACT: We report three patients with permanent tattoos and chronic dermatitis. During patch testing, the patients' dermatitis worsened, and the previously quiescent green-colored portions of the tattoos became inflamed. All three patients were patch-tested and had positive reactions to potassium dichromate 0.25% in petrolatum. Avoidance led to the resolution of both the dermatitis and the tattoo inflammation. We recommend assessment of permanent tattoos for inflammation in all patients undergoing patch testing, for additional diagnostic correlation.
    Dermatitis 09/2008; 19(5):E33-4. DOI:10.2310/6620.2008.08034 · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Carmen Gelpi · Sharon E Jacob
    Contact Dermatitis 05/2008; 58(4):248-9. DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2007.01273.x · 3.62 Impact Factor
  • Sharon E Jacob · Stacy Chimento · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan
    Contact Dermatitis 05/2008; 58(4):242-3. DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2007.1261.x · 3.62 Impact Factor
  • Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Sharon E Jacob
    Contact Dermatitis 04/2008; 58(3):171-2. DOI:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2007.01214.x · 3.62 Impact Factor
  • Sharon E Jacob · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan
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    ABSTRACT: In 2007 "fragrances" were named "allergen of the year" by the American Contact Dermatitis Society to highlight the importance of this group of allergens. Because fragrance allergy in children is a real problem that is potentially avoidable by substituting products free of these sensitizing chemicals (see Table, page 103), action toward awareness and prevention is imperative.
    Pediatric Annals 03/2008; 37(2):102-3. DOI:10.3928/00904481-20080201-04 · 0.29 Impact Factor
  • Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Sharon E Jacob
    Dermatitis 01/2008; 19(4):E22-3. · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan · Sharon E Jacob
    Dermatitis 01/2008; 19(4):E24-5. · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • Disease-a-Month 01/2008; 54(1-2):7-156. DOI:10.1016/j.disamonth.2007.10.002 · 0.54 Impact Factor
  • Sharon E Jacob · Mari Paz Castanedo-Tardan
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic contact dermatitis is a highly prevalent, potentially chronic disease, with a significant economic and quality of life impact. Culprit causal allergen(s) can be identified though patch testing, the 'gold-standard' diagnostic method. For most people, identification and subsequent avoidance of their clinically relevant allergens will results in resolution of the dermatitis. However, when an avoidance regimen is not possible, or an allergen is not identified, patients potentially require symptomatic and immunosuppressive therapy to diminish the manifestations of their disease. This article reviews a therapeutic approach to allergic contact dermatitis.
    Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 12/2007; 8(16):2757-74. DOI:10.1517/14656566.8.16.2757 · 3.09 Impact Factor
  • M. P. Castanedo-Tardan · F. Díaz-Barriga · S. E. Jacob
    Dermatitis 06/2007; 18(2):108-109. DOI:10.1097/01206501-200706000-00025 · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • M. P. Castanedo-Tardan · S. Stechschulte · S. E. Jacob
    Dermatitis 06/2007; 18(2):113. DOI:10.1097/01206501-200706000-00038 · 1.36 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

110 Citations
29.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2011
    • Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center
      Lebanon, New Hampshire, United States
  • 2008–2011
    • University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
      • Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
      Miami, Florida, United States
    • The University of Chicago Medical Center
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2008–2009
    • University of California, San Diego
      • Division of Dermatology
      San Diego, CA, United States
  • 2007–2009
    • University of Miami
      • • Cosmetic Medicine and Research Institute
      • • Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
      كورال غيبلز، فلوريدا, Florida, United States