Leslie L Montgomery

Montefiore Medical Center, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (29)119.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Radiation from medical imaging may induce cellular damage and increase the risk of cancer. While health care workers are restricted to an annual dose of 50 milliSieverts (mSv), the exposure to patients is not typically recorded. After breast-conservation therapy (BCT), patients are subjected to screening mammography, diagnostic breast imaging, and systemic surveillance imaging (SSI). Our objectives are to determine the cumulative radiation exposure of breast cancer survivors after completion of BCT, and to compare exposure levels in two historical cohorts. We also evaluated the indications of SSI. We performed a retrospective study of 68 patients with stage I or II breast cancer who received BCT in 1997 or 2002. Cumulative radiation exposure during follow-up from all imaging attributable to the breast cancer diagnosis was recorded, including both breast and non-breast imaging. The indications for SSI were recorded. In the first 5 years after BCT, patients received a median annual dose of 0.92 mSv with no difference between the 1997 and 2002 cohorts. A median of 90% of radiation exposure was due to mammography. From 1997 to 2002, the percentage of patients receiving computed tomography (CT) scans increased. Additional SSI occurred in 65% of patients, with the majority of tests ordered in the asymptomatic patient. Patients with nodal positivity were more likely to receive SSI (p = 0.03). In the first 5 years after BCT, annual radiation exposure due to imaging was low. However, it seems prudent to consider the risks of radiation exposure when ordering potentially low-yield screening studies in asymptomatic patients.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 01/2011; 18(1):104-8. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    Jennifer Delli Carpini, Amer K Karam, Leslie Montgomery
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor neovascularization is a complex process that plays a crucial role in the development of many different types of cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen that is involved with mitogenesis, angiogenesis, endothelial survival, and the induction of hematopoiesis. By increasing vascular permeability in endothelial cells, it helps tumors recruit wound-healing proteins fibrin and fibrinogen from the plasma, suggesting that tumor formation is a process of abnormal wound healing dependent on the ability to generate a blood supply. The human female reproductive tract is highly dependent on VEGF for normal functions such as endometrial proliferation and development of the corpus luteum. The unique influence of female sex steroid hormones on the expression and activity of VEGF deems angiogenesis an important facet of the development of breast and ovarian cancer. Additionally, the up-regulation of VEGF by the E6 oncoprotein of the human papillomavirus suggests that VEGF plays an important role in the development of cervical cancer. Clinical trials have investigated the humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab as potential treatment for all three forms of cancer; the data show that in breast cancer, the use of bevacizumab may lengthen the disease-free survival for women with advanced breast cancer, but does not appear to change their overall survival. It may have a role as salvage chemotherapy for ovarian and cervical cancer, though further research is needed to establish it as a definitive form of treatment.
    Angiogenesis 06/2010; · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Women treated with therapeutic chest radiation may develop breast cancer. To summarize breast cancer risk and breast cancer surveillance in women after chest radiation for pediatric or young adult cancer. Studies from MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL (1966 to December 2008). Articles were selected to answer any of 3 questions: What is the incidence and excess risk for breast cancer in women after chest radiation for pediatric or young adult cancer? For these women, are the clinical characteristics of breast cancer and the outcomes after therapy different from those of women with sporadic breast cancer in the general population? What are the potential benefits and harms associated with breast cancer surveillance among women exposed to chest radiation? Three investigators independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Standardized incidence ratios ranged from 13.3 to 55.5; cumulative incidence of breast cancer by age 40 to 45 years ranged from 13% to 20%. Risk for breast cancer increased linearly with chest radiation dose. Available limited evidence suggests that the characteristics of breast cancer in these women and the outcomes after diagnosis are similar to those of women in the general population; mammography can detect breast cancer, although sensitivity is limited. The quality of evidence for key questions 2 and 3 is limited by substantial study heterogeneity, variation in study design, and small sample size. Women treated with chest radiation have a substantially elevated risk for breast cancer at a young age, which does not seem to plateau. In this high-risk population, there seems to be a benefit associated with early detection. Further research is required to better define the harms and benefits of lifelong surveillance.
    Annals of internal medicine 04/2010; 152(7):444-55; W144-54. · 13.98 Impact Factor
  • Jennifer Delli Carpini, Amer K Karam, Leslie Montgomery
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor neovascularization is a complex process that plays a crucial role in the development of many different types of cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen that is involved with mitogenesis, angiogenesis, endothelial survival, and the induction of hematopoiesis. By increasing vascular permeability in endothelial cells, it helps tumors recruit wound-healing proteins fibrin and fibrinogen from the plasma, suggesting that tumor formation is a process of abnormal wound healing dependent on the ability to generate a blood supply. The human female reproductive tract is highly dependent on VEGF for normal functions such as endometrial proliferation and development of the corpus luteum. The unique influence of female sex steroid hormones on the expression and activity of VEGF deems angiogenesis an important facet of the development of breast and ovarian cancer. Additionally, the up-regulation of VEGF by the E6 oncoprotein of the human papillomavirus suggests that VEGF plays an important role in the development of cervical cancer. Clinical trials have investigated the humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab as potential treatment for all three forms of cancer; the data show that in breast cancer, the use of bevacizumab may lengthen the disease-free survival for women with advanced breast cancer, but does not appear to change their overall survival. It may have a role as salvage chemotherapy for ovarian and cervical cancer, though further research is needed to establish it as a definitive form of treatment.
    Angiogenesis 03/2010; 13(1):43-58. · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 10/2009; 77(4):1105-12. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Partial breast irradiation has been tested in limited pilot studies and shown to provide acceptable cosmesis, minimal toxicity and adequate local control. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using quadrant high-dose intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Fifty-two women with early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving therapy and IORT between October 2002 and January 2006. The first 18 women received a radiation dose of 20 Gy. The protocol was then amended and the remaining 34 women were treated with 18 Gy. Each patient was evaluated after surgery, and at 3, 6 and 12 months; complications, toxicity and cosmetic outcomes were recorded by the breast surgeon. Women treated with 18 Gy appeared to have a more favourable cosmetic outcome compared with the earlier treatment group. At last follow-up, none of the women treated on the protocol had a breast recurrence. Experience suggests that this IORT technique is feasible, although further follow-up is necessary to assess its therapeutic value.
    British Journal of Surgery 10/2008; 95(9):1105-10. · 4.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In breast cancer, a combination of radioisotope and blue dye mapping maximizes the success and accuracy of sentinel node (SLN) biopsy. When multiple radioactive nodes are present, there is no single definition of isotope success, but the popular "10% rule" dictates removal of all SLN with counts >10% of the most radioactive node. Here we determine how frequently a positive SLN would be missed by the 10% rule. Between 9/96 and 12/04, we performed 6,369 successful SLN biopsies using (99m)Tc sulfur colloid and isosulfan blue dye, removing as SLN all radioactive and/or blue nodes, and taking counts from each node ex vivo. Standard processing of all SLNs with a benign frozen section included hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, serial sectioning, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). 33% of patients (2,130/6,369) had positive SLNs. Of these patients, 1,387/2,130 (65%) had >1 SLN identified. The most radioactive SLN was benign in 29% (398/1,387), and 107/1,387 (8%) had a positive SLN that was neither blue nor the hottest. From this group 1.7% (24/1387) of patients had positive SLN with counts <10% radioactive counts of the hottest node. The 10% rule captured 98.3% of positive nodes in patients with multiple SLNs. No patient characteristics were predictive of failure of the 10% rule. With combined isotope and blue dye mapping, the 10% rule is a robust guideline and fails to identify only 1.7% (24/1387) of all SLN-positive patients with multiple SLNs. This guideline appears to be equally valid for all subsets of patients.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 08/2008; 15(10):2728-33. · 4.12 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics - INT J RADIAT ONCOL BIOL PHYS. 01/2008; 72(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect breast cancer in high-risk patients, but is associated with a significant false-positive rate resulting in unnecessary breast biopsies. More data are needed to define the role of MRI screening for specific high-risk groups. We describe our experience with MRI screening in patients with atypical hyperplasia (AH) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). We retrospectively reviewed data from our high-risk screening program prospective database for the period from April 1999 (when screening MRI was first performed at our institution) to July 2005. Patients with AH or LCIS demonstrated on previous surgical biopsy were identified. All patients underwent yearly mammography and twice yearly clinical breast examination. Additional screening MRI was performed at the discretion of the physician and patient. We identified 378 patients; 126 had AH and 252 had LCIS. Of these, 182 (48%) underwent one or more screening MRIs (mean, 2.6 MRIs; range, 1-8) during this period, whereas 196 (52%) did not. Those who had MRIs were younger (P < 0.001) with stronger family histories of breast cancer (P = 0.02). In MRI-screened patients, 55 biopsies were recommended in 46/182 (25%) patients, with 46/55 (84%) biopsies based on MRI findings alone. Cancer was detected in 6/46 (13%) MRI-generated biopsies. None of the six cancers detected on MRI were seen on recent mammogram. All six cancers were detected in five patients (one with bilateral breast cancer) with LCIS; none were detected by MRI in the AH group. Thus, cancer was detected in 5/135 (4%) of patients with LCIS undergoing MRI. The yield of MRI screening overall was cancer detection in 6/46 (13%) biopsies, 5/182 (3%) MRI-screened patients and 5/478 (1%) total MRIs done. In two additional MRI-screened patients, cancer was detected by a palpable mass in one, and on prophylactic surgery in the other and missed by all recent imaging studies. For 196 non-MRI-screened patients, 21 (11%) underwent 22 biopsies during the same period. Eight of 22 (36%) biopsies yielded cancer in seven patients. All MRI-detected cancers were stage 0-I, whereas all non-MRI cancers were stage I-II. Patients with AH and LCIS selected to undergo MRI screening were younger with stronger family histories of breast cancer. MRI screening generated more biopsies for a large proportion of patients, and facilitated detection of cancer in only a small highly selected group of patients with LCIS.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 04/2007; 14(3):1051-7. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine whether lymphoscintigraphy (LSG) for sentinel lymph node (SNL) mapping in a woman with a breast mass presents an unacceptable risk to her fetus. We assessed radiation-absorbed dose to various organs from 99mTc-sulfur colloid (TSC) LSG using standard internal absorbed dose assessment methodologies for both reference phantoms as well as for phantom models using the specific patient population characteristics such as total body and injected organ mass. The study also projected the radiation-absorbed dose to the fetus from LSG for SLN mapping. Data from 1,021 nonpregnant women with early-stage breast cancer who underwent SLN mapping and biopsy procedures were analyzed. Patients had a single-site intradermal injection of unfiltered TSC in 0.05 mL normal saline: 3.7 MBq (0.1 mCi) on the morning of surgery (1-d protocol) or 18.5 MBq (0.5 mCi) on the afternoon before surgery (2-d protocol). A standard internal dose calculation methodology was used to calculate absorbed doses to various organs and to a modeled fetus at 3-, 6-, and 9-mo gestation from the injection site as well as from systemic activity. The highest estimated absorbed doses were observed for the reference 9-mo-pregnant model under the 2-d protocol. Absorbed doses of 14.9, 0.214, 0.062, 0.151, 0.004, 0.163, 0.075, and 0.014 mGy were received by the injected breast, heart, liver, lung, ovaries, thymus, total body, and fetus, respectively. Effective doses from the 2-d protocol were estimated to be 0.460, 0.186, and 0.245 mSv for the reference population, the total Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) study patient population, and childbearing-age MSKCC patient population (i.e., <45 y old), respectively. SLN procedures lead to a negligible dose to the fetus of 0.014 mGy or less. This is much less than the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements limit to a pregnant woman. Calculations using actual patient population characteristics resulted in lower organ dose estimates than more conservative reference models.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine 08/2006; 47(7):1202-8. · 5.77 Impact Factor
  • Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - PLAST RECONSTR SURG. 01/2006; 118.
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    ABSTRACT: Ductal lavage (DL) is a new procedure for sampling of the mammary epithelium, but experience with this technique remains limited. We compared the findings in paired DL and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens obtained from patients with breast carcinoma. Four reviewers evaluated all DL samples. Two reviewers also examined the FNA material and compared cellular composition and morphologic findings in paired samples. DL and FNA samples from six patients were satisfactory for evaluation. Two DL samples showed marked atypia, one showed mild atypia, and two were benign; there was no agreement in one case (mild atypia vs. benign). Overall, the atypical cells in DL samples resembled those in the paired FNA material, but low degree of cytologic atypia and relative paucity of atypical cells limited their correct identification. The interpretation of DL samples is more challenging than that of FNA material, but similar criteria apply. To increase the sensitivity of DL, the number of epithelial cells required for a satisfactory sample should be higher than previously set.
    Diagnostic Cytopathology 01/2006; 33(6):370-5. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Implant reconstruction has a major role to play in breast reconstruction, as some patients neither wish nor are suitable for autogenous reconstruction. The suitability of implant reconstruction in patients who may receive postoperative, adjuvant radiation therapy has not, however, been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate complications, capsular contracture, aesthetic outcomes, and patient satisfaction in patients who have undergone bilateral tissue expander/implant reconstruction and unilateral, post exchange, adjuvant radiotherapy. In this study population, the effect of radiation can best be appreciated because the nonirradiated breast acts as a control. A review of all bilateral tissue expander/implant reconstructions at a single cancer center was undertaken. Twelve patients who underwent bilateral expander/implant reconstruction and unilateral postexchange radiotherapy were eligible for participation. A prospective evaluation of complications, cosmesis, and patient satisfaction was performed. The evaluation of cosmesis and patient satisfaction was executed for 10 of the 12 patients, as two were dead at the time of follow-up. Mean follow-up was 23.5 months (range, 12 to 58.5 years). In 40 percent of patients, there was no discernible difference in capsular contracture between the irradiated and nonirradiated breasts. In 50 percent of patients, the irradiated breast demonstrated increased contracture by a single modified Baker grade. In 10 percent of patients, contracture of the irradiated breast was two modified Baker grades greater than that of the nonirradiated side (grade III versus grade I). For the majority of patients, the degree of capsular contracture was higher on the irradiated side, yet overall symmetry, aesthetic results, and patient satisfaction remained high. These data support the conclusion that immediate, bilateral breast reconstruction using tissue expansion and implants is an acceptable option for the subset of patients who may undergo unilateral, postexchange radiotherapy.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery 12/2005; 116(6):1642-7. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to identify the rate of axillary recurrence after sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for breast cancer. SLN biopsy is a new standard of care for axillary lymph node staging in breast cancer. Nevertheless, most validated series of SLN biopsy confirm that the SLN is falsely negative in 5-10% of node-positive cases, and few studies report the rate of axillary local recurrence (LR) for that subset of patients staged by SLN biopsy alone. Through December of 2002, 4008 consecutive SLN biopsy procedures were performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center for unilateral invasive breast cancer. Patients were categorized in 4 groups: SLN-negative with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND; n = 326), SLN-negative without ALND (n = 2340), SLN-positive with ALND (n = 1132), and SLN-positive without ALND (n = 210). Clinical and pathologic characteristics and follow-up data for each of the 4 cohorts were evaluated with emphasis on patterns of axillary LR. With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-75), axillary LR occurred in 10/4008 (0.25%) patients overall. In 3 cases (0.07%) the axillary LR was the first site of treatment failure, in 4 (0.1%) it was coincident with breast LR, and in 3 (0.07%) it was coincident with distant metastases. Axillary LR was more frequent among the unconventionally treated SLN-positive/no ALND patients than in the other 3 conventionally treated cohorts (1.4% versus 0.18%, P = 0.013). Axillary LR after SLN biopsy, with or without ALND, is a rare event, and this low relapse rate supports wider use of SLN biopsy for breast cancer staging. There is a low-risk subset of SLN-positive patients in whom completion ALND may not be required.
    Annals of Surgery 10/2004; 240(3):462-8; discussion 468-71. · 6.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined whether the volume of isosulfan blue dye used in sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in breast cancer is related to the SLN identification rate or to the incidence of allergic reactions. From January 2001 to November 2002, 1728 breast cancer patients underwent 1832 SLN mapping procedures with the combined technique of intraparenchymal blue dye and intradermal radioisotope. Details of each procedure and all allergic reactions were prospectively recorded. Bilateral synchronous SLN procedures were considered as one dye exposure but as two distinct procedures for determining mapping success. Dye-only success was defined as the proportion of cases in which the SLN was identified by blue dye alone. Overall dye success was defined as the proportion of cases in which the SLN was identified by blue dye with or without isotope. When stratified by volume of blue dye, there were no significant differences in dye-only successes, overall dye successes, or mapping failures. Allergic reactions were documented in 31 (1.8%) of 1728 patients. Hypotensive reactions occurred in 3 (.2%) of 1728 patients; 2 (.1%) required pressor support. There was a nonsignificant trend toward fewer allergic reactions with smaller volumes of blue dye. In combined-technique SLN mapping protocols for breast cancer, using smaller volumes of blue dye may represent a means of optimizing the safety of the procedure without compromising its success.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 06/2004; 11(5):535-41. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ductal lavage (DL) is a new method for the sampling of breast epithelium. Data regarding its sensitivity in the detection of epithelial abnormalities, including carcinoma in situ (CIS), remains limited. DL was performed in the affected breasts of 26 women undergoing mastectomy for mammary carcinoma and in the clinically normal breast of 4 additional women undergoing risk-reducing mastectomy. After surgery, dye was injected through the microcatheter used for DL. Three cytopathologists independently reviewed all DL slides and the data reflect consensus by at least two reviewers. Interobserver agreement was assessed. The findings in DL samples were correlated with the features of CIS in the mastectomy specimens. Four (14%) of 29 DL samples satisfactory for evaluation showed marked atypia, 10 (34%) showed mild atypia, and 15 (52%) were benign. No DL sample was clearly malignant. Interobserver agreement was good (average kappa = 0.52). Of the DL samples satisfactory for evaluation, 27 had been obtained from 24 breasts containing CIS, which included 18 ductal CIS (DCIS), 3 lobular CIS (LCIS), 2 DCIS and LCIS, and 1 solid CIS with mixed ductal and lobular features. Invasive carcinoma was present in 20 samples. Two DL samples from breasts with extensive LCIS showed mild atypia and injected dye was identified in ducts and lobules involved by LCIS. DL had low sensitivity for CIS in breasts that also contained invasive carcinoma. The use of DL remains investigational, and close follow-up should be continued for all patients undergoing DL, including those with benign diagnoses.
    Cancer 12/2003; 98(10):2170-6. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has proved to be an accurate alternative to complete axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) in clinically node-negative breast cancer patients. Multicentric (MC) and multifocal (MF) invasive breast cancers are considered to be relative contraindications to SLNB. We examine the accuracy of SLNB in patients with MC and MF invasive breast cancers. From September 1996 to August 2001, a total of 3,501 patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer underwent SLNB using both blue dye and radioisotope at our institution. A total of 70 patients had MC or MF invasive breast cancer, a successful SLNB, and mastectomy for local control. All had >/=10 axillary nodes excised (including the SLN) in a planned ALND. Exclusion criteria included MC and MF in situ carcinoma; breast conservation; previous breast irradiation, ALND, or SLNB; recurrent breast cancer; neoadjuvant chemotherapy; or ALND based solely on SLNB pathologic examination. RESULTS; The incidence of axillary metastases was 54% (38 of 70). SLNB accuracy was 96% (67 of 70), sensitivity 92% (35 of 38), and false-negative rate 8% (3 of 38). All patients with an inaccurate SLNB had a dominant invasive tumor >5 cm and one patient had palpable axillary disease intraoperatively. The SLN was the only site of axillary metastasis in 37% (14 of 38). Results were compared with those of published SLNB validation studies, most of which reflect experience with single-site invasive breast cancers. No statistically significant difference was noted for accuracy, sensitivity, or false-negative rate. SLNB accuracy in MC and MF disease is comparable with that of published validation studies. MC and MF patients with a dominant T3 tumor (>5 cm) or axillary disease palpable intraoperatively should have a concurrent formal ALND. Our retrospective data suggest SLNB may be used as a reliable alternative to conventional ALND in selected patients with MC or MF disease. Further studies in this patient population are warranted.
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons 10/2003; 197(4):529-35. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is a new standard of care for axillary node staging in patients with primary operable breast cancer. An increasing proportion of these patients undergo breast-conserving surgery, and 10% to 15% will develop local relapse requiring reoperation. Although previous breast or axillary surgery is often considered a contraindication to SLN biopsy, few data support this position. We report our experience with SLN biopsy in the reoperative setting. We examined the 3,490 consecutive SLN biopsy procedures for breast cancer performed at our institution between September 1996 and July 2001; 32 (1%) of these followed previous axillary surgery: 22 (69%) for breast recurrence after SLN biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND); 7 (22%) after a recent, failed SLN biopsy or inadequate ALND; and 3 (9%) after earlier axillary surgery for an unrelated condition. SLNs were identified in 24 of 32 (75%) cases and were positive in 3 of 24 (13%). Reoperative SLN biopsy was more successful when less than 10 versus 10 or more nodes had been removed previously (87% versus 44%). Both blue dye and isotope identified the SLN in 16 of 24 successful procedures (67%). Additional, nonsentinel nodes (mean, eight nodes) were removed in 17 of 24 patients (71%) and were negative in all cases. At a median followup of 13 months, no axillary recurrences have occurred. Reoperative SLN biopsy after earlier SLN biopsy or ALND is feasible in selected breast cancer patients and is more likely to succeed when fewer than 10 nodes were removed during the earlier procedure. Further study is required to better define the subset of patients in whom reoperative SLN biopsy can replace ALND.
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons 09/2002; 195(2):167-72. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We prospectively compared the sensory morbidity and lymphedema experienced after sentinel node biopsy (SLNB) and axillary dissection (ALND) over a 12-month period by using a validated instrument. Patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy completed the Breast Sensation Assessment Scale (BSAS) at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare ALND and SLNB over the 12-month period. Upper- and lower-arm circumference measurements at baseline and 12 months were used to assess lymphedema. SLNB was associated with substantial sensory morbidity, although significantly less than ALND, over time on all four subscales and the summary score. A statistically significant improvement in sensory morbidity occurred for both groups in the first 3 months, with no further change thereafter. For both types of axillary surgery, younger patients had significantly higher BSAS scores than older patients. There was no significant difference in arm circumference between patients with SLNB and ALND at 12 months. Among women undergoing breast-conserving therapy, SLNB has significant sensory morbidity, although approximately half that of ALND. Sensory morbidity improves in the first 3 months after surgery, but patients continue to report sensory morbidity at 1 year. Longitudinal follow-up is required to further assess lymphedema.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 09/2002; 9(7):654-62. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the United States, identification of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) requires the use of (99m)Tc-labeled colloid, 1% isosulfan blue dye, or both to trace the lymphatic drainage of a given neoplasm. We report our experience with adverse reactions to isosulfan blue dye during SLN mapping in breast cancer. A chart review of the breast cancer SLN database was performed; it included 2392 sequential patients who underwent SLN biopsy involving isosulfan blue dye at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from September 12, 1996, to August 17, 2000. Thirty-nine of 2392 patients (1.6%) had a documented allergic reaction during the mapping procedure. Most reactions (69%) produced urticaria, blue hives, a generalized rash, or pruritus. The incidence of hypotensive reactions was 0.5%. Although anaphylaxis after the injection of isosulfan blue dye is rare, this article highlights the need to suspect anaphylaxis when hemodynamic instability occurs after the injection of this compound. Our experience indicates that bronchospasm and respiratory compromise are unusual and that most patients do not require emergent intubation and can be managed with short-term pressor support. In addition, our data indicate that patients with a sulfa allergy do not display a cross-sensitivity to isosulfan blue dye. IMPLICATIONS: We report the largest single-institution review of adverse reactions to injection of isosulfan blue dye during sentinel lymph node mapping in breast cancer. Bronchospasm and respiratory compromise are unusual, and most patients can be treated with short-term pressor support. Patients with a sulfa allergy do not display a cross-sensitivity to isosulfan blue dye.
    Anesthesia & Analgesia 09/2002; 95(2):385-8, table of contents. · 3.30 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
119.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Montefiore Medical Center
      • Department of Surgery
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1999–2011
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • • Breast Service
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Department of Pathology
      New York City, New York, United States