Kenneth I. Maton

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States

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Publications (65)84.93 Total impact

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  • International Journal of Self Help and Self Care 01/2014; 8(1):61-84. DOI:10.2190/SH.8.1.i
  • International Journal of Self Help and Self Care 01/2014; 8(1):85-112. DOI:10.2190/SH.8.1.j
  • International Journal of Self Help and Self Care 01/2014; 8(1):41-60. DOI:10.2190/SH.8.1.h
  • Kenneth I. Pargament, Kenneth I. Maton
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    ABSTRACT: Examines religion in American life from a community psychology perspectives. The authors suggest that traditional psychological approaches to religion have been individualistic, overly-simplified and overly-biased, and noncollaborative. Rather than focus on religion as an individual expression, the authors examine religious institutions as they influence both individuals and communities. Their goal is to highlight the opportunities for community psychology to learn about, learn from, and work with religious systems. The authors provide a brief review of psychological approaches to religion, followed by a discussion of the theology, mission, and organization of religious systems and pathways of religious influence. The religious influence in American life includes meeting primary human needs for meaning and understanding, needs for community and belonging, and working toward the public good. Working with religion as a system includes efforts such as peer counseling, congregation development, and mentoring and supporting inner-city youth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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    ABSTRACT: Explored whether the New Warrior Training Adventure (NWTA), which begins participation in the ManKind Project (MKP), influences men's life goals, gender role conflict, self-development and attitudes toward women. 70 Ss (58.8% of 119) completed preweekend questionnaires, and 42 (35.3%) completed postweekend questionnaires. The average age was 48.0. Ss initially reported a striking, positive impact of participation in the NWTA on their life goals, gender role conflict, psychological well-being, and self-development, although the changes in their attitudes toward women were less clear. 35 group representatives were interviewed about whether MKP-I groups supported the initial changes men made during the NWTA. Findings reveal that the organization has successfully established member-led men's peer mutual support groups that can enable members to continue changes they began during weekend training. Representative members viewed the groups as moderately effective. Retention rates and group duration were greater than reported for some kinds of mutual support groups. Qualities and processes were identified that help explain how the I-groups function effectively. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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    ABSTRACT: The Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County is widely viewed as a national model of a program that enhances the number of underrepresented minority students who pursue science, technology, engineering, and mathematics PhDs. The current article provides an overview of the program and the institution-wide change process that led to its development, as well as a summary of key outcome and process evaluation research findings. African American Meyerhoff students are 5× more likely than comparison students to pursue a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics PhD. Program components viewed by the students as most beneficial include financial scholarship, being a part of the Meyerhoff Program community, the Summer Bridge program, study groups, and summer research. Qualitative findings from interviews and focus groups demonstrate the importance of the Meyerhoff Program in creating a sense of belonging and a shared identity, encouraging professional development, and emphasizing the importance of academic skills. Among Meyerhoff students, several precollege and college factors have emerged as predictors of successful entrance into a PhD program in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, including precollege research excitement, precollege intrinsic math/science motivation, number of summer research experiences during college, and college grade point average. Limitations of the research to date are noted, and directions for future research are proposed. Mt Sinai J Med 79:610-623, 2012 © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
    Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine A Journal of Translational and Personalized Medicine 09/2012; 79(5):610-23. DOI:10.1002/msj.21341 · 1.56 Impact Factor
  • Kenneth I. Maton
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    ABSTRACT: Seymour Sarason passed away on January 10, 2010 at the age of 91. He was the author of more than 40 books, including The Culture of the School and the Problem of Change (1971), The Creation of Settings and the Future Societies (1972), and The Psychological Sense of Community: Prospects for a Community Psychology (1974). His groundbreaking ideas were major influences in the .elds of education, community psychology, mental retardation, and care of the aged. Seymour is a seminal figure in the development of community psychology, providing a paradigm for action research (Psychoeducational Clinic). He generated key ideas to guide the field, emphasized the importance of historical and cultural context, and developed intellectually and personally meaningful relationships with many of the field's leaders
    Journal of Community Psychology 03/2012; 40(2). DOI:10.1002/jcop.20495 · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    American Journal of Community Psychology 12/2011; 48(3-4). DOI:10.1007/s10464-011-9426-1 · 1.74 Impact Factor
  • 09/2011; 11:47-70. DOI:10.1108/S1479-3644(2011)0000011007
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    ABSTRACT: A national, Web-based survey of 1,219 African American, Latina/o, Asian American, and European American psychology graduate students revealed both similarities and differences in experiences and perspectives. Mentoring was found to be the strongest predictor of satisfaction across groups. Academic supports and barriers, along with perceptions of diversity within the academic environment, were also important predictors of satisfaction. Students of color perceived less fairness of representation of their ethnic group within psychology than European American students, and a greater linkage between aspects of the graduate school experience and their ethnicity. Limitations of the study and implications for future research and action are discussed.
    Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology 01/2011; 17(1):68-78. DOI:10.1037/a0021668 · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Practical research experience has been seen as an important tool to enhance learning in STEM fields and shape commitment to science careers. Indeed, this was a prominent recommendation of the Boyer Commission. Further, there is evidence this is especially important for minority students. In this paper, we examine the role of practical research experience during the summer for talented minority undergraduates in STEM fields. We focus on the link between summer research and STEM Ph.D. program matriculation. We examine evidence on this question using detailed data on students participating in the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program over a 14 year period at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Our results provide evidence of strong positive effects of summer research on participation in STEM Ph.D. programs. Further, we show that the effects of summer research vary with the frequency and timing of these experiences. The evidence that educational strategies such as summer research experiences improve academic outcomes of minorities is vital, given concern about the science pipeline in the U.S. and the continuing growth in the racial/ethnic diversity of the college-age population.
    Education Policy Analysis Archives 12/2010; 18(30):1-36.
  • Eric S Mankowski, Kenneth I Maton
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    ABSTRACT: This paper introduces the special section by presenting a historical and conceptual review of theory and research on the psychology of men and masculinity and then introducing the section's papers. Men have power because of their gender, but differ in access to power based on other individual characteristics such as social class, income, education, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or physical strength. Men typically have been studied as generic rather than gendered beings in psychology. In contrast, a gendered analysis of men highlights the ways in which men's experience, masculinity, and behavior contribute to health and social problems and to resources commonly addressed by community psychologists. Our gendered analysis suggests ways of working with men in group, organizational, and community settings to create positive individual and social change. Crucial to this analysis is the paradox that enacting masculinity both privileges and damages men. A second paradox stems from men having power as a group over women while individual men feel powerless or victimized by women as a group. The papers in this volume illustrate key themes of our historical and conceptual review through studies of adolescent and adult men as fathers, patients, partner abusers, support group participants and community members, and through examination of the impact of their gendered identities and behavior on health, well being, and justice.
    American Journal of Community Psychology 03/2010; 45(1-2):73-86. DOI:10.1007/s10464-009-9288-y · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Men have poorer health and declining social outcomes when compared to women, and research suggests that behaviors related to restrictive and traditional male gender roles contribute to this disparity. This study is an examination of The ManKind Project International (MKPI), a community-based organization that provides alternative male gender norms and a community support system to help reinforce them. The MKPI runs an intensive, experiential "Training Adventure Weekend" (TAW), followed by voluntary, on-going peer-led support and integration groups (I-Groups). One hundred men completed a pre-TAW questionnaire, an interview, and a long-term follow-up (>18 mo.) questionnaire. The study examined if there was change on the primary study variables at follow-up, and the relationship of background characteristics (age, self-help group experience) and factors related to participation (MKPI beliefs, social support, I-Group participation) to the criterion variables (depression symptoms, gender role conflict, and life satisfaction) at follow-up. Results indicated significant change in the expected directions on the primary study variables, suggesting that for these men, participation has a positive impact. Most importantly, changes in MKPI-related beliefs and social support significantly predicted positive outcomes. Also, more positive outcomes were found among men 30-44 years of age, but not among those with more prior self-help experience or I-Group participation. Possible explanations for these findings and directions for further research are discussed.
    American Journal of Community Psychology 03/2010; 45(1-2):186-200. DOI:10.1007/s10464-009-9283-3 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Meyerhoff Scholarship Program, which celebrated its 20th year in 2008, is considered a suc- cessful intervention program for increasing the number of underrepresented minorities who earn Ph.D.s or M.D./Ph.D.s and pursue research careers in science, technology, engineering, and math- ematics (STEM). This article examines the relationship between participation in one specific com- ponent of the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program—on-campus, academic year research—and the pur- suit of a STEM Ph.D. by 13 cohorts of program participants. The results indicate that participation in on-campus, academic year research is associated with a substantial increase in the probability of pursuing a STEM Ph.D. They further suggest that the structure and intensity of the on-campus, academic year research experience matter.
    Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 12/2009; 31(4):441. DOI:10.3102/0162373709348584 · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Freeman A. Hrabowski, Kenneth I. Maton
    11/2009; 6:207-228. DOI:10.1108/S1479-3644(2009)0000006015
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    Angela Fedi, Terri Mannarini, Kenneth I. Maton
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    ABSTRACT: Empowering community settings exist in many community domains. One domain includes groups and organizations that empower oppressed citizens to challenge societal culture and institutions, and take action to change them. To be considered empowering, a community setting must have both an empowering process, and lead to an empowered outcome. Our study tried to answer the following question: Does the empowering community setting model provide a potentially useful framework for analysis of community movements? Based on qualitative analysis of data related to the characteristics of the anti–High Speed Railway movement (Susa Valley, Italy) and to its effects on the larger community, the findings support the view that at least some types of community movements are usefully regarded as empowering community settings. Discussion focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of applying this conceptual framework to community movements, and highlights directions for future research.
    Community Development 08/2009; 40(3):275-291. DOI:10.1080/15575330903109985
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    ABSTRACT: The current study examines the outcomes, processes, and individual predictors of pursuit of a STEM PhD among African-American students in the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program. Meyerhoff students were nearly five times more likely than comparison students to pursue a STEM PhD. Program components consistently rated as important were financial scholarship, being part of the Meyerhoff Program community, the Summer Bridge program, study groups, staff academic advising, and summer research opportunities. Furthermore, focus group findings revealed student internalization of key Meyerhoff Program values, including a commitment to excellence, accountability, group success, and giving back. In terms of individual predictors, multinomial logit regression analyses revealed that Meyerhoff students with higher levels of research excitement at college entry were more likely to pursue a STEM PhD.
    01/2009; 15(1):15-37. DOI:10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.v15.i1.20
  • Kenneth I. Maton, Kenneth I. Pargament
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    ABSTRACT: Religion represents an important resource for efforts to prevent significant personal and social problems. Yet, far from a unitary phenomena, religions embody fundamentally different world views, interpersonal communities, and practices. This chapter describes the diverse pathways through which religions attempt to influence both the individual congregation member and the larger community and society. The varied implications of these pathways for the well-being of the individual and the social system are considered. Drawing from case studies, several distinctive roles of religion are distilled, roles which raise general questions and challenges for preventive and promotive workers in diverse disciplines. Finally, directions for more effective collaboration between religion and allied disciplines are discussed.
    Prevention in human services 10/2008; 5(2). DOI:10.1300/J293v05n02_07
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    ABSTRACT: Based on interviews with nine individuals actively involved in religiously-affiliated service, we describe and examine their perspectives on prevention and on religion as a preventive influence. As an initial attempt to organize religion's implicit theory of prevention, the discussion is organized under three broad headings: (1) the religions world view and understanding of prevention; (2) the religious world view in practice, distinctive aspects of religion as prevention; and (3) issues of religious-human services collaboration in preventive action. Described in the context of religion as a different cultural setting, our major assertion is that prevention in religious contexts stems from a global yet differentiated promotion approach to human welfare. Given our assumption that there arc special religious influences which promote the health and well-being of individuals and communities, we challenge religion to better mobilize them, and human services to better appreciate and incorporate them.
    Prevention in human services 10/2008; 10(1). DOI:10.1300/J293v10n01_02