Joseph Blondeau

Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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Publications (1)2.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The CANWARD study (Canadian Ward Surveillance Study) assessed the antimicrobial susceptibility of a variety of available agents against 15 644 pathogens isolated from patients in Canadian hospitals between 2007 and 2009. The most active (based on MIC data) agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci were daptomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, and vancomycin (MRSA only) with MIC(90)'s (μg/mL) of 0.25 and 2, 2 and 2, 0.5 and 0.12, and 1, respectively. The most active agents against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli were colistin (polymyxin E), doripenem, ertapenem, meropenem, and tigecycline with MIC(90)'s (μg/mL) of 1, ≤ 0.12, 0.25, ≤ 0.12, and 1, respectively. The most active agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were amikacin, cefepime, ceftazidime, colistin, doripenem, meropenem, and piperacillin-tazobactam with MIC(90)'s (μg/mL) of 32, 16, 32, 2, 4, 8, and 64, respectively. Overall, the most active agents versus Gram-positive cocci from Canadian hospitals were vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline and versus Gram-negative bacilli were amikacin, cefepime, doripenem, ertapenem (excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa), meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, and tigecycline (excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa).
    Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease 03/2011; 69(3):291-306. · 2.45 Impact Factor