Jean-Yves Blay

Centre Léon Bérard, Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France

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Publications (240)1435.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To the authors' knowledge, the incidence of late recurrence (> 5 years after initial management) is unknown and no prognostic factors for late events have been characterized in patients with soft tissue sarcomas.
    Cancer 06/2014; · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Macrophage infiltration has been identified as an independent poor prognostic factor in several cancer types. The major survival factor for these macrophages is macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). We generated a monoclonal antibody (RG7155) that inhibits CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) activation. In vitro RG7155 treatment results in cell death of CSF-1-differentiated macrophages. In animal models, CSF-1R inhibition strongly reduces F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages accompanied by an increase of the CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell ratio. Administration of RG7155 to patients led to striking reductions of CSF-1R(+)CD163(+) macrophages in tumor tissues, which translated into clinical objective responses in diffuse-type giant cell tumor (Dt-GCT) patients.
    Cancer cell. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Regorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that inhibits several kinases relevant to tumor biology in several cancers, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). In phase III trials, regorafenib significantly improved overall survival versus placebo in patients with metastatic CRC progressing after all available standard therapies, and significantly prolonged progression-free survival in patients with advanced GIST in whom at least imatinib and sunitinib had failed. Thus, this agent holds promise as a new standard of care for CRC and GIST patients after disease progression following all other approved therapies. The clinical trials reported to date show that this new treatment has a consistent adverse event profile that is quite different from that of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapies. The most common adverse events of regorafenib include dermatologic and mucosal toxicities (especially hand-foot skin reaction, rash, and oral mucositis), constitutional symptoms (e.g., fatigue, nausea, and weight loss), vascular effects (especially hypertension), and gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., diarrhea). To help health care professionals anticipate and manage the adverse events associated with regorafenib, we describe our experiences in clinical trials and show that such toxicities can be effectively managed with close observation of patients from initiation of dosing, along with prompt appropriate interventions, including dose modifications, if necessary.
    The Oncologist 05/2014; · 4.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety/tolerability of sunitinib plus trastuzumab in patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer (ABC). Eligible patients received sunitinib 37.5 mg/day and trastuzumab administered either weekly (loading, 4 mg/kg; then weekly 2 mg/kg) or 3-weekly (loading, 8 mg/kg; then 3-weekly 6 mg/kg). Prior trastuzumab and/or lapatinib treatment were permitted. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR). Sixty patients were enrolled and evaluable for safety; 57 were evaluable for efficacy. The majority of patients (58%) had received no prior chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. The ORR was 37%; the clinical benefit rate (CBR; percent objective response plus stable disease >= 24 weeks) was 56%. Among patients who were treatment-naive or had received only adjuvant therapy, the ORR was 44% and the CBR was 59%. Overall, median overall survival had not been reached and the 1-year survival rate was 91%. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were mild to moderate in severity. Forty percent of patients experienced AEs related to measured left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) declines, which occurred more frequently in patients who had received prior anthracycline treatment. Ten percent of patients exhibited symptoms related to LVEF declines. One patient died on study from cardiogenic shock. Antitumor response and several safety parameters appeared to correlate with sunitinib exposure. Sunitinib plus trastuzumab demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with HER2-positive ABC, particularly those who were treatment-naive or had only received prior adjuvant treatment. Sunitinib plus trastuzumab had acceptable safety and tolerability in patients with HER2-positive ABC who had not received prior anthracycline therapy.Trial registration: NCT00243503.
    BMC Cancer 03/2014; 14(1):166. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Effective targeted treatment is unavailable for most sarcomas and doxorubicin and ifosfamide—which have been used to treat soft-tissue sarcoma for more than 30 years—still have an important role. Whether doxorubicin alone or the combination of doxorubicin and ifosfamide should be used routinely is still controversial. We assessed whether dose intensification of doxorubicin with ifosfamide improves survival of patients with advanced soft-tissue sarcoma compared with doxorubicin alone. Methods We did this phase 3 randomised controlled trial (EORTC 62012) at 38 hospitals in ten countries. We included patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or metastatic high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma, age 18–60 years with a WHO performance status of 0 or 1. They were randomly assigned (1:1) by the minimisation method to either doxorubicin (75 mg/m² by intravenous bolus on day 1 or 72 h continuous intravenous infusion) or intensified doxorubicin (75 mg/m²; 25 mg/m² per day, days 1–3) plus ifosfamide (10 g/m² over 4 days with mesna and pegfilgrastim) as first-line treatment. Randomisation was stratified by centre, performance status (0 vs 1), age (<50 vs ≥50 years), presence of liver metastases, and histopathological grade (2 vs 3). Patients were treated every 3 weeks till progression or unacceptable toxic effects for up to six cycles. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00061984. Findings Between April 30, 2003, and May 25, 2010, 228 patients were randomly assigned to receive doxorubicin and 227 to receive doxorubicin and ifosfamide. Median follow-up was 56 months (IQR 31–77) in the doxorubicin only group and 59 months (36–72) in the combination group. There was no significant difference in overall survival between groups (median overall survival 12·8 months [95·5% CI 10·5–14·3] in the doxorubicin group vs 14·3 months [12·5–16·5] in the doxorubicin and ifosfamide group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·83 [95·5% CI 0·67–1·03]; stratified logrank test p=0·076). Median progression-free survival was significantly higher for the doxorubicin and ifosfamide group (7·4 months [95% CI 6·6–8·3]) than for the doxorubicin group (4·6 months [2·9–5·6]; HR 0·74 [95% CI 0·60–0·90], stratified log-rank test p=0·003). More patients in the doxorubicin and ifosfamide group than in the doxorubicin group had an overall response (60 [26%] of 227 patients vs 31 [14%] of 228; p<0·0006). The most common grade 3 and 4 toxic effects—which were all more common with doxorubicin and ifosfamide than with doxorubicin alone—were leucopenia (97 [43%] of 224 patients vs 40 [18%] of 223 patients), neutropenia (93 [42%] vs 83 [37%]), febrile neutropenia (103 (46%) vs 30 [13%]), anaemia (78 [35%] vs 10 [5%]), and thrombocytopenia (75 [33%]) vs one [<1%]). Interpretation Our results do not support the use of intensified doxorubicin and ifosfamide for palliation of advanced soft-tissue sarcoma unless the specific goal is tumour shrinkage. These findings should help individualise the care of patients with this disease.
    The Lancet Oncology 03/2014; 15:415-423. · 25.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rectal and pararectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare. The optimal management strategy for primary localized GISTs remains poorly defined. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 41 patients with localized rectal or pararectal GISTs treated between 1991 and 2011 in 13 French Sarcoma Group centers. Of 12 patients who received preoperative imatinib therapy for a median duration of 7 (2-12) months, 8 experienced a partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 had a complete response. Thirty and 11 patients underwent function-sparing conservative surgery and abdominoperineal resection, respectively. Tumor resections were mostly R0 and R1 in 35 patients. Tumor rupture occurred in 12 patients. Eleven patients received postoperative imatinib with a median follow-up of 59 (2.4-186) months. The median time to disease relapse was 36 (9.8-62) months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86.5%. Twenty patients developed local recurrence after surgery alone, two developed recurrence after resection combined with preoperative and/or postoperative imatinib, and eight developed metastases. In univariate analysis, the mitotic index (<=5) and tumor size (<=5 cm) were associated with a significantly decreased risk of local relapse. Perioperative imatinib was associated with a significantly reduced risk of overall relapse and local relapse. Perioperative imatinib therapy was associated with improved disease-free survival. Preoperative imatinib was effective. Tumor shrinkage has a clear benefit for local excision in terms of feasibility and function preservation. Given the complexity of rectal GISTs, referral of patients with this rare disease to expert centers to undergo a multidisciplinary approach is recommended.
    BMC Cancer 03/2014; 14(1):156. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effective targeted treatment is unavailable for most sarcomas and doxorubicin and ifosfamide-which have been used to treat soft-tissue sarcoma for more than 30 years-still have an important role. Whether doxorubicin alone or the combination of doxorubicin and ifosfamide should be used routinely is still controversial. We assessed whether dose intensification of doxorubicin with ifosfamide improves survival of patients with advanced soft-tissue sarcoma compared with doxorubicin alone. We did this phase 3 randomised controlled trial (EORTC 62012) at 38 hospitals in ten countries. We included patients with locally advanced, unresectable, or metastatic high-grade soft-tissue sarcoma, age 18-60 years with a WHO performance status of 0 or 1. They were randomly assigned (1:1) by the minimisation method to either doxorubicin (75 mg/m(2) by intravenous bolus on day 1 or 72 h continuous intravenous infusion) or intensified doxorubicin (75 mg/m(2); 25 mg/m(2) per day, days 1-3) plus ifosfamide (10 g/m(2) over 4 days with mesna and pegfilgrastim) as first-line treatment. Randomisation was stratified by centre, performance status (0 vs 1), age (<50 vs ≥50 years), presence of liver metastases, and histopathological grade (2 vs 3). Patients were treated every 3 weeks till progression or unacceptable toxic effects for up to six cycles. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00061984. Between April 30, 2003, and May 25, 2010, 228 patients were randomly assigned to receive doxorubicin and 227 to receive doxorubicin and ifosfamide. Median follow-up was 56 months (IQR 31-77) in the doxorubicin only group and 59 months (36-72) in the combination group. There was no significant difference in overall survival between groups (median overall survival 12·8 months [95·5% CI 10·5-14·3] in the doxorubicin group vs 14·3 months [12·5-16·5] in the doxorubicin and ifosfamide group; hazard ratio [HR] 0·83 [95·5% CI 0·67-1·03]; stratified log-rank test p=0·076). Median progression-free survival was significantly higher for the doxorubicin and ifosfamide group (7·4 months [95% CI 6·6-8·3]) than for the doxorubicin group (4·6 months [2·9-5·6]; HR 0·74 [95% CI 0·60-0·90], stratified log-rank test p=0·003). More patients in the doxorubicin and ifosfamide group than in the doxorubicin group had an overall response (60 [26%] of 227 patients vs 31 [14%] of 228; p<0·0006). The most common grade 3 and 4 toxic effects-which were all more common with doxorubicin and ifosfamide than with doxorubicin alone-were leucopenia (97 [43%] of 224 patients vs 40 [18%] of 223 patients), neutropenia (93 [42%] vs 83 [37%]), febrile neutropenia (103 (46%) vs 30 [13%]), anaemia (78 [35%] vs 10 [5%]), and thrombocytopenia (75 [33%]) vs one [<1%]). Our results do not support the use of intensified doxorubicin and ifosfamide for palliation of advanced soft-tissue sarcoma unless the specific goal is tumour shrinkage. These findings should help individualise the care of patients with this disease. Cancer Research UK, EORTC Charitable Trust, UK NHS, Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute, Amgen.
    The Lancet Oncology 03/2014; · 25.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rare cancer issues have not been much explored yet because of their low incidence. That is why epidemiological studies have difficulties in identifying indisputable etiological risk factors. An expert opinion, mainly concentrated in some establishments, is required for these cancers' management. However, on account of the potential remoteness of these therapeutic resources, the patients' way of care remains also unstudied. By means of a geographical analysis of a regional exhaustive cohort of sarcoma, diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 and followed during five years at least, we can make progress on these different issues. Gastro-Intestinal and Stromal Tumors (GIST) occur more frequently in privileged territories while liposarcomas arise in more deprived areas. The association between liposarcomas and areas deprivation is significant (P=0.05). Moreover, pre-operative biopsy and some clinical patient characteristics, age, grade or tumor localization, are associated with an increase in the distance covered by patients for the first-line treatment (p ≤ 0,001). In the scope of an interdisciplinary collaboration, the geographical approach develops some hypothesis for rare cancers research, which must be tested by other larger scale studies.
    Bulletin du cancer 02/2014; · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many data are presented each year during the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting and others international major meetings. This article is proposed by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer as a synthesis of important new data. The purpose is to identify in these results those who may have an immediate impact on our clinical practices.
    Bulletin du cancer 01/2014; 101(1):75-92. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim This randomised phase III trial evaluated first-line trabectedin versus doxorubicin-based chemotherapy (DXCT) in patients with advanced/metastatic translocation-related sarcomas (TRS). Methods Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive trabectedin 1.5 mg/m2 24-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion every 3 weeks (q3wk) (Arm A), or doxorubicin 75 mg/m2 i.v. q3wk, or doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 i.v. plus ifosfamide (range, 6–9 g/m2) i.v. q3wk (Arm B). Progression-free survival (PFS) by independent review was the primary efficacy end-point. Results One hundred and twenty-one patients were randomised; 88 of them had TRS confirmed by central pathology review (efficacy population). Twenty-nine PFS events were assessed by independent review (16 with trabectedin; 13 with DXCT). PFS showed non-significant difference between arms (stratified log rank test, p = 0.9573; hazard ratio = 0.86, p = 0.6992). At the time of this analysis, 63.9% and 58.3% of patients were alive in trabectedin and DXCT arms, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in survival curves. Response rate according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) v.1.0 was significantly higher in DXCT arm (27.0% versus 5.9%), but response according to Choi criteria showed fewer differences between treatment arms (45.9% versus 37.3%). Safety profile was as expected for both arms, with higher incidence of severe neutropenia, alopecia and mucositis in the DXCT arm. Conclusion Neither trabectedin nor doxorubicin-based chemotherapy showed significant superiority in the first-line treatment of patients with advanced translocation-related sarcoma.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 01/2014; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Macrophage infiltration has been identified as an independent poor prognostic factor in several cancer types. The major survival factor for these macrophages is macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). We generated a monoclonal antibody (RG7155) that inhibits CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) activation. In vitro RG7155 treatment results in cell death of CSF-1-differentiated macrophages. In animal models, CSF-1R inhibition strongly reduces F4/80+ tumor-associated macrophages accompanied by an increase of the CD8+/CD4+ T cell ratio. Administration of RG7155 to patients led to striking reductions of CSF-1R+CD163+ macrophages in tumor tissues, which translated into clinical objective responses in diffuse-type giant cell tumor (Dt-GCT) patients.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The current refinement of nosological classification of sarcoma which integrates molecular typing with a growing number of subtypes contrasts with the one-size-fits-all approach proposed in clinical practice guidelines for both local treatment and systemic treatment in the past. However, there is a growing proportion of sarcomas in which specific treatment strategies are proposed as standard. As a consequence, central review by expert sarcoma pathologists should be organised to ensure the optimal management of all patients. The key parameters in the pathology report influencing treatment decisions are therefore rapidly evolving. First a diagnostic biopsy, ideally an imaged guided microbiopsy performed by an experienced team, is a recommended practice. On the resection specimen, the size, histological grade, location, depth, surgical margins and tumour fragmentation are essential parameters to guide the treating physician. Molecular characterisation of the driving genomic event is becoming increasingly important for treatment decision making, in routine practice and in clinical trials. Molecular grade is a research tool with potentially high utility, and requires further evaluation and validation in prospective clinical trials.
    Pathology 12/2013; · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are a heterogeneous group of cancers comprising over 50 histological subtypes. Current treatment strategies for sarcomas are increasingly adapted to histological and molecular subtype, and several patient- and tumour-related factors influence treatment decision. Seven oncologists specialising in the management of STS, from Europe, the United States of America and Japan, met to develop a practical model to identify parameters guiding treatment decision-making in advanced STS. Literature searches were carried out to identify key published evidence, in particular phase II and III randomised trials, to validate the model, and extensive clinical experience was used as expert evidence. A document was developed to provide a logical approach to advanced STS management and was analysed critically by a second group of STS specialists. Broad consensus was reached during this exercise and the following parameters were identified as key factors influencing treatment decision: chemosensitivity of histological subtype, natural history of the diagnosis, tumour burden, tumour site, locally advanced primary and/or metastases, patient's general condition, relevant comorbidities, previous chemotherapy, treatment goal and patient acceptance. These parameters, judged useful for treatment selection, were based on published literature, the selection process within clinical trials and expert opinion (some factors have not been formerly defined in published literature). A model describing factors affecting treatment decisions in sarcoma was established. The model requires validation and several of its parameters require standardisation.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 11/2013; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have carried out a stratified phase II study of sorafenib (So) in patients with advanced angiosarcoma (n = 32) and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (n = 13). This report concerns the correlative analysis of the predictive values of circulating pro/anti-angiogenetic biomarkers. Using the ELISA method (R&D Systems), circulating biomarkers (VEGF-A, in picograms per milliliter), thrombospondin-1 (TSP1, in micrograms per milliliter), stem cell factor (SCF, in picograms per milliliter), placental growth factor (PlGF, in picograms per milliliter), VEGF-C (in picograms per milliliter), and E-selectin (in nanograms per milliliter) were measured before So treatment and after 7 days. VEGF-A (mean value 475 vs. 541, p = 0.002), TSP1 (16 vs. 24, p = 0.0002), and PlGF (20.9 vs. 40.7, p = 0.0001) significantly increased during the treatment. Treatment did not affect the levels of SCF, VEGF-C, and E-selectin. Only two biomarkers were associated with better outcome as follows: VEGF-A and PlGF. Best objective response and non-progression at 180 days were associated with low level of VEGF-A at baseline (p = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). There was a correlation between the circulating level of VEGF-A and time to progression (TTP) (r = -0.47, p = 0.001). Best objective response and non-progression at 180 days were not associated with baseline level of PIGF, but there was a correlation between the circulating level of PIGF at baseline and TTP. Low level of VEGF-A at baseline (<500) was significantly associated with better outcome.
    Targeted Oncology 11/2013; · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), most of which harbor oncogenic mutation in genes that encode the receptor tyrosine kinases KIT or PDGFA. Imatinib is the standard of care for patients with advanced GIST and for patients with primary GIST at significant risk of recurrence after surgery. This review discusses data supporting continuous kinase suppression with imatinib and key issues, including response to imatinib reintroduction, effect of treatment interruption on secondary resistance to imatinib, and prognostic factors associated with sustained response to imatinib. Long-term follow-up results of the B2222 study and updated results of the BFR14 trial demonstrate that continuous imatinib treatment in patients with advanced GIST is associated with reduced risk of progression. For patients progressing on or intolerant of imatinib, continuing therapy with TKIs sunitinib followed by regorafenib is recommended. In the adjuvant setting, final results of the trial by the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group and the Sarcoma Group of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie demonstrate that 3 years of adjuvant imatinib, compared with 1 year, significantly reduces the risk of recurrence and improves overall survival of patients with KIT-positive GIST at high risk of recurrence. Maintenance of therapy with TKIs is the key to successful treatment of GIST. Results from recent studies provide a strong rationale for continuous imatinib treatment for 3 years following surgical resection and long-term continuous administration in advanced or metastatic GIST.
    The Oncologist 10/2013; · 4.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Primary cardiac sarcomas (PCS) are rare tumours of dismal prognosis. Data of 124 patients with PCS referred to institutions of the French Sarcoma Group (FSG) from 1977 and 2010 were reviewed. Median age was 48.8years. PCS were poorly-differentiated sarcomas (N=45, 36.3%), angiosarcomas (N=40, 32.3%), leiomyosarcomas (N=16, 12.9%) and others (N=23, 18.6%). At diagnosis, 100 patients (80.6%) were localised and 24 (19.4%) metastatic. Tumours were located in the right (N=47, 38.8%), left atrial cavities (N=45, 37.2%) or encompassed several locations in nine cases (7.4%). Surgery was performed in 81 cases (65.3%). Heart transplant was performed in five patients. Radiotherapy adjuvant (N=18, 14.5%) or alone (N=6, 4.8%) was performed in non-metastatic patients only (N=24, 19.4%). With a median follow-up of 51.2months, median overall survival (OS) was 17.2months for the entire cohort, 38.8months after complete resection versus 18.2 after incomplete resection and 11.2months in non-resected patients. Radiotherapy was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) on multivariate analysis. Chemotherapy was significantly associated with better OS only in non-operated patients but not in operated patients. In non-metastatic patients, surgery (hazard ratio [HR]=0.42, p<0.001), male gender (HR=0.56, p=.032) was associated with better OS and surgery (HR=0.61; p=.076), radiotherapy (HR=0.43; p=.004) and chemotherapy (HR=0.30, p=.003) improved PFS. Only surgical resection is associated with a perspective of prolonged survival. Chemotherapy is associated with a better outcome in non-resected patients.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 10/2013; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate clinical presentation, optimal diagnostic evaluation and treatment, and outcome in primary leptomeningeal lymphoma, a rare form of primary CNS lymphoma without parenchymal or systemic involvement. The International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group, a multidisciplinary group of physicians with a particular interest in primary CNS lymphoma, retrospectively identified cases of lymphoma isolated to the leptomeninges as diagnosed by CSF cytology, flow cytometry, or biopsy, without systemic or parenchymal brain/spinal cord lymphoma or immunodeficiency. Forty-eight patients were identified, with median age at diagnosis of 51 years and median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. Presenting symptoms were multifocal in 68%. Leptomeningeal enhancement was seen in 74% and CSF profile was abnormal in all cases. CSF cytology detected malignant lymphocytes in 67%. Flow cytometry identified monoclonal population in 80%, as did receptor gene rearrangement studies in 71%. Sixty-two percent had B-cell lymphoma, 19% T-cell, and 19% unclassified. Treatment varied and included fractionated radiotherapy (36%), systemic chemotherapy (78%), and intra-CSF chemotherapy (66%), with 66% receiving ≥2 modalities. Seventy-one percent had a favorable clinical response; ultimately, 44% received salvage treatment. Median overall survival was 24 months, with 11 patients still alive at 50 months follow-up. Primary leptomeningeal lymphoma is a rare form of primary CNS lymphoma. Patients usually present with multifocal symptoms, with evidence of leptomeningeal enhancement and diagnostic CSF analysis. Although treatment is highly variable, patients have a better prognosis than previously reported and a subset may be cured.
    Neurology 10/2013; · 8.25 Impact Factor
  • Peter Reichardt, Heikki Joensuu, Jean-Yves Blay
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    ABSTRACT: To review the prognostic factors and stratification systems used to determine the need for adjuvant therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), and to review recent clinical advances in investigation of the efficacy and safety of adjuvant imatinib mesylate treatment. Recent data from clinical trials of various durations of adjuvant imatinib in GIST are reviewed, with emphasis on key results from the Phase III American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z9001 trial and the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group XVIII/Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (SSGXVIII/AIO) trial. Complete surgical resection remains the standard of treatment for localized GISTs; however, disease recurrence occurs in up to 50 % of patients who undergo complete resection. The ACOSOG Z9001 trial established that 1 year of adjuvant imatinib reduces the risk of recurrence in patients with resected GIST. The SSGXVIII/AIO trial further demonstrated that 3-year adjuvant imatinib improves both recurrence-free survival and overall survival compared with 1-year therapy in patients at high risk of recurrence after surgery. Considering risk factors associated with tumor recurrence is essential for identifying the patients who are most likely to benefit from adjuvant imatinib. Although the optimal duration of adjuvant therapy remains to be determined, results from these pivotal trials provide firm evidence that adjuvant imatinib improves recurrence-free survival and improved overall survival of patients in the SSGXVIII/AIO trial. Ongoing studies may shed further light on the benefits and harms of adjuvant therapy, as well as the most appropriate patient candidates for adjuvant imatinib treatment.
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 08/2013; · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sarcomas are rare cancers with great variability in clinical and histopathological presentation. The main objective of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is to standardize diagnosis and treatment. From March 2005 to February 2007, all patients diagnosed with localized sarcoma in the Rhône-Alpes region were included in a cohort-based study, to evaluate the compliance of sarcoma management with French guidelines in routine practice and to identify predictive factors for compliance with CGPs. 634 (71 %) patients with localized sarcoma satisfying the inclusion criteria were included out of 891 newly diagnosed sarcomas. Taking into account initial diagnosis until follow-up, overall conformity to CPGs was only 40 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) = 36-44], ranging from 54 % for gastrointestinal stromal tumor to 36 % for soft tissue sarcoma and 42 % for bone sarcoma. In multivariate analysis, primary tumor type [relative risk (RR) = 4.42, 95 % CI = 2.79-6.99, p < 0.001], dedicated multidisciplinary staff before surgery (RR = 4.19, 95 % CI = 2.39-7.35, p < 0.001) and management in specialized hospitals (RR = 3.71, 95 % CI = 2.43-5.66, p < 0.001) were identified as unique independent risk factors for conformity to CPGs for overall treatment sequence. With only 40 % of total conformity to CPGs, the conclusions support the improvement of initial sarcoma management and its performance in specialized centres or within specialized dedicated networks.
    International Journal of Clinical Oncology 08/2013; · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • Jean-Yves Blay, Piotr Rutkowski
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    ABSTRACT: Imatinib mesylate, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is indicated for first-line treatment of patients with unresectable and/or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Imatinib also is approved as adjuvant therapy for patients following resection of primary GIST. Despite the efficacy of imatinib for the treatment of patients with GIST, adherence to treatment can prove difficult. Clinical studies have identified a number of factors that have a significant association with non-adherence to therapy, including age >51years, female sex, a high number of concomitant medications, and complications with patients' therapy or the disease itself. Moreover, treatment-related adverse events and increased healthcare costs have been shown to have an impact on patients' adherence to therapy. A study of perceptions of adherence to therapy found discrepancies between actual and perceived adherence rates; both patients and physicians overestimate adherence to treatment. Non-adherence to treatment is not exclusive to oncology, and occurs in other disease areas, particularly with chronic conditions. Evidence from other disease areas suggests that routine assessment of adherence and the implementation of adherence programs can lead to improvements in health status and reduced healthcare costs. Improving patient adherence to imatinib treatment for patients with unresectable/metastatic GIST is particularly important, because non-adherence has a significant impact on clinical outcomes and healthcare costs. Therefore, the effective management of treatment-related adverse events along with patient education may be important in keeping patients compliant with continuous therapy.
    Cancer Treatment Reviews 08/2013; · 6.02 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
1,435.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2014
    • Centre Léon Bérard
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2013
    • Hôpital La Pitié Salpêtrière (Groupe Hospitalier "La Pitié Salpêtrière - Charles Foix")
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • HELIOS Klinik Blankenhain
      Бланкенхајн, Thuringia, Germany
    • Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin
      • Laboratoire Épidémiologie et Oncogenèse des Tumeurs Digestives (ONCO)
      Versailles, Île-de-France, France
  • 2012–2013
    • Unicancer
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Cancer Research Center of Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Radboud University Nijmegen
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Nijmegen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands
    • Cea Leti
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Partners HealthCare
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2010–2013
    • Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
      Villeurbanne, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • University Hospital München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2004–2013
    • Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy
      • Department of Radiotherapy
      Île-de-France, France
  • 2011–2012
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology
      Brookline, MA, United States
    • University of Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Institut de France
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Sarcoma Oncology Center
      Santa Monica, California, United States
    • KU Leuven
      • Department of Oncology
      Leuven, VLG, Belgium
    • University of Franche-Comté
      Becoinson, Franche-Comté, France
    • Clinique Du Parc
      Croix, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2008–2011
    • Institut Paoli Calmettes
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
    • Leiden University Medical Centre
      • Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology
      Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2003–2011
    • Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2009
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 2007–2009
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Internal Oncology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
    • Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust
      Nottigham, England, United Kingdom
    • Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2005–2009
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      • Unité d’Immunologie des Tumeurs et Immunothérapie U1015
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2004–2009
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2004–2008
    • CHU de Lyon - Groupement Hospitalier Edouard Herriot
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2006
    • Centre Jean Perrin
      Clermont, Auvergne, France
    • Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Ouest)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2004–2005
    • Hospices Civils de Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France