Jay D Iams

The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States

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Publications (261)1331.7 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective To test whether elevated umbilical cord serum inflammatory cytokine levels predicted subsequent cerebral palsy (CP) or neurodevelopmental delay (NDD). Study Design Nested case-control analysis within a clinical trial of antenatal magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) before anticipated preterm birth (PTB) for prevention of CP, with evaluation of surviving children at the age of 2. NDD was defined as a Bayley psychomotor developmental index (PDI) and/or mental developmental index (MDI) < 70. Controls, defined as surviving children without CP and with Bayley PDI and MDI ≥ 85, were matched by race and gestational age. Cord serum was analyzed for interleukin-8 (IL-8) interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels. Elevated cytokine levels were defined as ≥ 75th percentile in placebo-exposed controls. Analyses compared case/control cytokine levels, adjusting for MgSO4 exposure, gestational age, race/ethnicity, and sociodemographic differences. Results Logistic regression analysis with 339 cases and 276 controls showed that elevated IL-8 and IL-1β were more common in cord blood serum from infants with subsequent low MDI as compared with controls. After adjusting for additional confounders, the significant differences were no longer evident. Cytokine levels (IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α) were not elevated with CP or low PDI. Conclusion Cord serum IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α levels in preterm infants are not associated with subsequent CP or NDD.
    American Journal of Perinatology 06/2014; · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • Jay D Iams
    New England Journal of Medicine 05/2014; 370(19):1861. · 51.66 Impact Factor
  • Jay D Iams
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    ABSTRACT: Recognition of preterm birth as the major underlying cause of infant mortality in the United States has placed responsibility for prevention in the hands of obstetrician-gynecologists. The advent of effective methods to identify and treat women with increased risk is a major advance that will alter the focus of prenatal care. Adoption of research findings into clinical practice, never an easy task, will be particularly challenging for efforts to reduce the risk of preterm birth. Historical risk factors for preterm birth are numerous and variably defined. Measurement of the length of the cervix with ultrasonography requires unique personnel and facilities. Care algorithms exist but lack the detailed information that comes with experience. This review offers perspective and detail to aid health care practitioners in developing a prematurity prevention strategy appropriate to their practice population.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 05/2014; · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the frequency of severe maternal morbidity, assess its underlying etiologies, and develop a scoring system to predict its occurrence.Supplemental Digital Content is Available in the Text. This was a secondary analysis of a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network cohort of 115,502 women and their neonates born in 25 hospitals across the United States over a 3-year period. Women were classified as having severe maternal morbidity according to a scoring system that takes into account the occurrence of red blood cell transfusion (more than three units), intubation, unanticipated surgical intervention, organ failure, and intensive care unit admission. The frequency of severe maternal morbidity was calculated and the underlying etiologies determined. Multivariable analysis identified patient factors present on admission that were independently associated with severe maternal morbidity; these were used to develop a prediction model for severe maternal morbidity. Among 115,502 women who delivered during the study period, 332 (2.9/1,000 births, 95% confidence interval 2.6-3.2) experienced severe maternal morbidity. Postpartum hemorrhage was responsible for approximately half of severe maternal morbidity. Multiple patient factors were found to be independently associated with severe maternal morbidity and were used to develop a predictive model with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.80. Severe maternal morbidity occurs in approximately 2.9 per 1,000 births, is most commonly the result of postpartum hemorrhage, and occurs more commonly in association with several identifiable patient characteristics. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 04/2014; 123(4):804-810. · 4.80 Impact Factor
  • Jay D Iams
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 02/2014; 210(2):97-8. · 3.28 Impact Factor
  • Jay D Iams
    New England Journal of Medicine 01/2014; 370(3):254-61. · 51.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether progestin prophylaxis influenced the odds of recurrent spontaneous preterm birth among pregnant women with a previous preterm birth. A retrospective cohort study was performed evaluating outcomes of pregnant women with one or more previous preterm births who received prenatal care in a single academic prematurity clinic. Care algorithms were determined and revised by a single supervising physician. Progestin prophylaxis was adopted in 2004 with accelerated access to the first clinic visit adopted in 2008. Rates of preterm birth before 37, 35, and 32 weeks of gestation were compared over time. One thousand sixty-six women with a history of one or more spontaneous preterm births received care in the prematurity clinic and were delivered between January 1, 1998, and June 30, 2012. The gestational age at initiation of prenatal care declined significantly after adoption of an accelerated appointment process (median of 19.1 weeks before 2003, 16.2 weeks from 2004 to 2007, and 15.2 weeks from 2008 to 2012, P<.01), and progestin use increased from 50.8% in 2004-2007 to 80.3% after 2008 (P<.01). After adjustment for race, smoking, cerclage, and number of prior preterm deliveries, we noted a statistically significant decreased odds of spontaneous preterm birth in years 2008-2012 compared with 1998-2007 before 37 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-0.97) and 35 (adjusted OR 0.70, 95% CI (.52-0.94) weeks of gestation. Adoption of prophylactic progestin treatment was associated with a decreased odds of recurrent preterm birth before 37 or 35 weeks of gestation after adoption of an aggressive program to facilitate early initiation of progestin treatment. : II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 01/2014; 123(1):34-9. · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To determine whether hospital differences in the frequency of adverse obstetric outcomes are related to differences in care. Study Design The Assessment of Perinatal EXcellence (APEX) cohort of 115,502 women and their neonates born in 25 hospitals in the United States between March 2008 and February 2011. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to quantify the amount of variation in postpartum hemorrhage, peripartum infection, severe perineal laceration, and a composite adverse neonatal outcome among hospitals that is explained by differences in patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, and the obstetric care provided. Results 115,502 women were included in the study. For most outcomes, between 20 and 40% of hospital differences in outcomes were related to differences in patient populations. After controlling for patient-, provider- and hospital-level factors, multiple care processes were associated with the predefined adverse outcomes, but these care processes did not explain significant variation in the frequency of adverse outcomes among hospitals. Ultimately, between 50 and 100% of the inter-hospital variation in outcomes was unexplained. Conclusion Hospital differences in the frequency of adverse obstetric outcomes could not be explained by differences in frequency of types of care provided.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 01/2014; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes in nulliparous women with non-medically indicated inductions at term versus those expectantly managed. Study Design Data were obtained from maternal and neonatal charts for all deliveries on randomly selected days across 25 US hospitals over a three-year period. A low-risk subset of nulliparas with vertex non-anomalous singleton gestations who delivered 38 0/7 to 41 6/7 weeks were selected. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for non medically indicated induction within each week were compared with women who did not undergo non medically indicated induction during that week. Multivariable analysis was used to adjust for hospital, maternal age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, cigarette use and insurance status. Results 31,169 women met criteria. Neonatal complications were either less frequent with non medically indicated induction or no different between groups. Non medically indicated induction was associated with less frequent peripartum infections (OR 0.39, 95%CI 0.16-0.98) at 38 weeks and less frequent third and fourth degree lacerations (OR 0.60, 95%CI 0.42-0.86) and less frequent peripartum infections (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.49-0.90) at 39 weeks. Non medically indicated induction was associated with a longer admission-to-delivery time by approximately 3 to 4 hours and increased odds of cesarean delivery at 38 weeks (OR 1.50 95%CI 1.08-2.08) and 40 weeks (OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.15-1.46). Conclusion At 39 weeks, non medically indicated induction is associated with lower maternal and neonatal morbidity than women expectantly managed.
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of the article is to determine whether prior spontaneous abortion (SAB) or induced abortion (IAB), or the interpregnancy interval are associated with subsequent adverse pregnancy outcomes in nulliparous women. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of data collected from nulliparous women enrolled in a completed trial of vitamins C and E or placebo for preeclampsia prevention. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for maternal and fetal outcomes were determined for nulliparous women with prior SABs and IABs as compared with primigravid participants. Results Compared with primigravidas, women with one prior SAB were at increased risk for perinatal death (adj. OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3) in subsequent pregnancies. Two or more SABs were associated with an increased risk for spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) (adj. OR, 2.6, 95% CI, 1.7-4.0), preterm premature rupture of membranes (PROM) (adj. OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.3), and perinatal death (adj. OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.3). Women with one previous IAB had higher rates of spontaneous PTB (adj. OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9) and preterm PROM (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). An interpregnancy interval less than 6 months after SAB was not associated with adverse outcomes. Conclusion Nulliparous women with a history of SAB or IAB, especially multiple SABs, are at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.
    American Journal of Perinatology 12/2013; · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of the study is to determine if umbilical cord serum concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and myeloperoxidase (MPO), in pregnancies at risk for preterm birth (PTB), are associated with neonatal morbidities and/or altered neurodevelopmental outcomes in the children. Study Design Umbilical cord serum samples were collected at birth from 400 newborns delivered within a multicenter randomized controlled trial of repeated versus single course of antenatal corticosteroids (ACs), in women at increased risk for PTB. Newborns were followed through discharge and were evaluated between 36 and 42 months corrected age with neurological examination and Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Umbilical cord serum concentrations of IL-6, CRP, and MPO were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Multivariate logistic regression analyses explored the relationship between umbilical cord serum IL-6, CRP, and MPO levels, adverse newborn outcomes, and PTB < 32 weeks of gestational age (GA). Results Univariate analysis revealed that umbilical cord IL-6 above the 75th percentile was associated with increased respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and chronic lung disease (CLD), but not with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), or neonatal sepsis; however, this association was not significant after adjusting for GA at delivery and treatment group. No significant associations between CRP or MPO and RDS, CLD, NEC, sepsis, or IVH were evident. Regression analysis revealed that CRP above the 75th percentile was associated with a decreased risk of CLD (odds ratio, 0.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.41). No associations between umbilical cord IL-6, CRP, or MPO and MDI < 70 or PDI < 70 were evident. Umbilical cord serum concentrations of IL-6, CRP, and MPO, above the 75th percentile, were associated with more frequent PTB < 32 weeks of GA. Conclusion Elevated umbilical cord serum concentration of CRP is associated with reduced risk for CLD even after adjusting for GA at delivery. Occurrence of levels > 75th percentile of IL-6, CRP, and MPO in umbilical cord serum was associated with PTB < 32 weeks of GA. Elevated umbilical cord serum concentrations of IL-6, CRP, and MPO at birth were not associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes.
    American Journal of Perinatology 12/2013; · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most premature infants born in the United States each year are classified as either moderately preterm (MPT) or late preterm (LPT) infants. Unnecessary variation in care and lack of evidence-based practices may contribute to the morbidities of prematurity. Quality-improvement (QI) initiatives designed for neonates have primarily focused on extremely low-gestational-age newborns. However, the lessons learned in this group of infants could be applied to decreasing unnecessary variation among MPT and LPT infants. Practice variation in the timing of nonindicated preterm deliveries, the use of progesterone, respiratory care practices, feeding management, and discharge planning are particularly in need of QI.
    Clinics in perinatology 12/2013; 40(4):777-89. · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17-OHPC) 250 mg weekly reduces recurrent spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) in women with a prior SPTB by 33%. The dose is not based on pharmacological considerations. A therapeutic concentration has not been determined hampering any attempt to optimize treatment. This study evaluated the relationship between 17-OHPC plasma concentrations and the rate of SPTB in women with singleton gestation. A single blood sample was obtained between 25 and 28 weeks gestation from 315 women with a SPTB who participated in a placebo-controlled, prospective, randomized clinical trial evaluating the benefit of omega-3 supplementation in reducing preterm birth. All women in the parent study received 17-OHPC and 434 received omega-3 supplementation and 418 received a placebo. Plasma from 315 consenting women was analyzed for 17-OHPC concentration. There were no differences between placebo and omega-3 supplemented groups in demographic variables, outcomes or in mean 17-OHPC concentration. Plasma concentrations of 17-OHPC ranged from 3.7- 56 ng/ml. Women with plasma concentrations of 17-OHPC in the lowest quartile had a significantly higher risk of spontaneous preterm birth (p= 0.03) and delivered at significantly earlier gestational ages (p = 0.002) than did women in the 2(nd) to 4(th) quartiles. The lowest preterm birth rates were seen when median 17-OHPC concentrations exceeded 6.4 ng/ml. Low plasma 17-OHPC concentration is associated with an increased risk of SPTB. This finding validates efficacy of this treatment but suggests that additional studies are needed to determine the optimal dosage.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 10/2013; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective African Americans experience preterm birth at nearly twice the rate of whites. Chronic stress associated with minority status is implicated in this disparity. Inflammation is a key biological pathway by which stress may affect birth outcomes. This study examined the effects of race and pregnancy on stress-induced inflammatory responses.Methods Thirty-nine women in the second trimester of pregnancy (19 African American, 20 white) and 39 demographically similar nonpregnant women completed an acute stressor (Trier Social Stress Test). Psychosocial characteristics, health behaviors, and affective responses were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL)-6 was measured at baseline, 45 minutes, and 120 minutes poststressor.ResultsIL-6 responses at 120 minutes poststressor were 46% higher in African Americans versus whites (95% confidence interval = 8%-81%, t(72) = 3.51, p = .001). This effect was present in pregnancy and nonpregnancy. IL-6 responses at 120 minutes poststressor tended to be lower (15%) in pregnant versus nonpregnant women (95% confidence interval = -5%-32%, p = .14). Racial differences in inflammatory responses were not accounted for by demographics, psychological characteristics, health behaviors, or differences in salivary cortisol. Pregnant whites showed lower negative affective responses than did nonpregnant women of either race (p values ≤ .007).Conclusions This study provides novel evidence that stress-induced inflammatory responses are more robust among African American women versus whites during pregnancy and nonpregnancy. The ultimate impact of stress on health is a function of stressor exposure and physiological responses. Individual differences in stress-induced inflammatory responses represent a clear target for continued research efforts in racial disparities in health during pregnancy and nonpregnancy.
    Psychosomatic Medicine 07/2013; · 4.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectiveStress and depressive symptoms predict exaggerated inflammatory responses to a biological challenge in nonpregnant humans and animals. The extent to which these findings generalize to pregnancy is unknown because the immune system exhibits substantial changes to support pregnancy. Notably, inflammatory responses to infectious agents play a causal role in the development of gestational hypertension as well as risk for preterm birth. Thus, depressive symptoms may increase susceptibility to these outcomes via sensitization of inflammatory processes. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that depressive symptoms would predict an exaggerated proinflammatory response to an in vivo antigen challenge, influenza virus vaccination, among pregnant women.MethodTwenty-two pregnant women completed two study visits: baseline and 1 week after receiving influenza virus vaccination. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) at baseline. Serum levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were determined using a high sensitivity immunoassay at both study visits.OutcomesAnalyses demonstrated that, as compared to those in the lowest tertile of CES-D scores, those in the highest tertile exhibited significantly higher levels of MIF 1 week after influenza virus vaccination (p = .035).ConclusionsDepressive symptoms predicted exaggerated MIF production following influenza virus vaccination during pregnancy. These data support the hypothesis that depressive symptoms are associated with sensitization of the inflammatory response during pregnancy. Thus, women with greater depressive symptoms may be more vulnerable to negative sequelae of infectious illness during pregnancy.
    Brain Behavior and Immunity 07/2013; 24(1):49-53. · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Biobehavioral correlates of self-rated health in pregnancy are largely unknown. PURPOSE: The goals of this study were to examine, in pregnant women, associations of self-rated health with (1) demographics, objective health status, health behaviors, and psychological factors, and (2) serum inflammatory markers. METHODS: In the second trimester of pregnancy, 101 women provided a blood sample, completed measures of psychosocial stress, health status, and health behaviors, and received a comprehensive periodontal examination. RESULTS: The following independently predicted poorer self-rated health: (1) greater psychological stress, (2) greater objective health diagnoses, (3) higher body mass index, and (4) past smoking (versus never smoking). Poorer self-rated health was associated with higher serum interleukin-1β (p = 0.02) and marginally higher macrophage migration inhibitory factor (p = 0.06). These relationships were not fully accounted for by behavioral/psychological factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides novel data regarding factors influencing subjective ratings of health and the association of self-rated health with serum inflammatory markers in pregnant women.
    Annals of Behavioral Medicine 06/2013; · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether an individualized growth standard (IS) improves identification of preterm small-for-gestational-age (SGA) neonates at risk of developing moderate/severe cerebral palsy (CP) or death. STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of data from a randomized trial of MgSO4 for prevention of CP or death among anticipated preterm births. Singleton non-anomalous liveborns delivered before 34 weeks' were classified as SGA (< 10th % for their GA) by a population standard (PS) or an IS (incorporating maternal age, height, weight, parity, race/ethnicity, and neonatal gender). The primary outcome was prediction of moderate or severe CP or death by age 2. RESULTS: Of 1588 eligible newborns, 143 (9.4%) experienced CP (N=33) or death (N=110). Forty-four (2.8%) were SGA by the PS and 364 (22.9%) by the IS. All PS-SGA newborns also were identified as IS-SGA. SGA newborns by either standard had a similarly increased risk of CP or death (PS: RR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.3 vs. IS: RR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.5, respectively). The similarity of RRs remained after stratification by MgSO4 treatment group. The IS was more sensitive (36% vs. 6%, p <.001), but less specific (78% vs. 98%, p <.001) for CP or death. ROC curve analysis revealed a statistically lower AUC for the PS, although the ability of either method to predict which neonates would subsequently develop CP or death was poor (PS: 0.55, 95% CI 0.49-0.60 vs. IS: 0.59, 95% CI 0.54-0.64, p<.001). CONCLUSION: An individualized SGA growth standard does not improve the association with, or prediction of, CP or death by age 2.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 06/2013; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Lipoproteins are associated with atherogenic and inflammatory processes, and these processes may be related to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We therefore examined whether variations in lipoprotein particle size and concentration are associated with preterm birth (PTB) < 35 weeks' gestation. METHODS: This is a case-control ancillary study to a randomized trial of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation to prevent recurrent PTB. We measured standard lipids and used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize 17 lipoprotein particles from plasma collected at the baseline randomization visit (16-21 weeks gestation) in 128 cases (PTB < 35 weeks' gestation) and 132 term controls. Logistic regression models controlled for study center, race/ethnicity, number of prior PTB, smoking and treatment group, as well as total LDL, HDL and triglyceride concentrations when examining LDLNMR lipoproteins, HDLNMR lipoproteins and VLDLNMR lipoproteins, respectively. RESULTS: Only one of the 17 NMR lipoproteins was associated with recurrent PTB. We observed an increased odds of recurrent PTB of 1.04 (95% CI= 1.01-1.08; p=0.02) per nanometer increase in VLDLNMR particle size and an odds ratio of 3.00 (CI= 1.40-6.43; p=0.005) for the 3(rd) tertile of VLDLNMR particle size compared with the 1(st) tertile. CONCLUSION: In women with prior PTB, variations in mid-pregnancy lipoproteins were not associated with recurrent PTB overall, however the trend observed with VLDLNMR particle size is suggestive that PTB may be amenable to lifestyle, nutritional or pharmacologic interventions.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 06/2013; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To estimate a gestational age threshold at which the benefits of treatment with weekly courses of antenatal corticosteroids (ACS) during preterm labor outweigh the risks. STUDY DESIGN: Risk-benefit ratios by gestational age are determined using a Markov microsimulation decision-analysis model with a 1-week cycle length. Single course and multiple (weekly to max of 4) courses of ACS by gestational age of entry (23 to 31 6/7 weeks) are compared. Benefits are composite events (respiratory distress syndrome, chronic lung disease, severe intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia or stillbirth) averted. Risks are small head circumference and small for gestational age. RESULTS: More composite events are averted (benefits) than risks acquired (6:1) when multiple courses of ACS are initiated at 26 weeks' gestation. When multiple courses of ACS are initiated at 29 weeks' gestation, the risk-benefit ratio is 1. Beyond 29 weeks, there is a suggestion of more risk than benefit. CONCLUSION: The model suggests that multiple courses of ACS initiated at less than 29 'weeks' gestation may have increased benefit compared to risks. Further analyses are needed to determine the long term clinical significance of these findings.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 06/2013; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:: To assess whether there was an independent association between maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations at 24-28 weeks of gestation and preterm birth in a multicenter U.S. cohort of twin pregnancies. METHODS:: Serum samples from women who participated in a clinical trial of 17 α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate for the prevention of preterm birth in twin gestations (2004-2006) were assayed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (n=211). Gestational age was determined early in pregnancy using a rigorous algorithm. Preterm birth was defined as delivery of the first twin or death of either twin at less than 35 weeks of gestation. RESULTS:: The mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was 82.7 nmol/L (standard deviation 31.5); 40.3% of women had concentrations less than 75 nmol/L. Preterm birth at less than 35 weeks of gestation occurred in 49.4% of women with 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations less than 75 nmol/L compared with 26.2% among those with concentrations of 75 nmol/L or more (P<.001). After adjustment for maternal race and ethnicity, study site, parity, prepregnancy body mass index, season, marital status, education, gestational age at blood sampling, smoking status, and 17 α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate treatment, maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration of 75 nmol/L or more was associated with a 60% reduction in the odds of preterm birth compared with concentrations less than 75 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2-0.8). A similar protective association was observed when studying preterm birth at less than 32 weeks of gestation (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.6) and after confounder adjustment. CONCLUSIONS:: Late second-trimester maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations less than 75 nmol/L are associated with an increase in the risk of preterm birth in this cohort of twin pregnancies. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:: II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 06/2013; · 4.80 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,331.70 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1982–2014
    • The Ohio State University
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Psychiatry
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 2013
    • Overton Brooks VA Medical Center
      Shreveport, Louisiana, United States
    • Winston-Salem State University
      Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
    • McGill University
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2012–2013
    • Northwestern University
      • • Division of General Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Evanston, IL, United States
    • University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Galveston, TX, United States
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2003–2013
    • Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 2011–2012
    • University of Utah
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Salt Lake City, UT, United States
    • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Brown University
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Providence, RI, United States
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • Thomas Jefferson University
      • Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
    • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
      Maryland, United States
    • Wayne State University
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Detroit, MI, United States
    • University of California, Irvine
      • Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Irvine, CA, United States
    • Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
      Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • • Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences
      • • School of Medicine
      • • Division of General Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
    • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • 2005–2012
    • University of Cincinnati
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Cincinnati, OH, United States
  • 2003–2012
    • Wake Forest University
      Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • 1998–2012
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Birmingham, AL, United States
  • 1996–2012
    • Oregon Health and Science University
      • Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Portland, OR, United States
  • 2009–2010
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Texas Medical School
      • Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1996–2008
    • National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
      Maryland, United States
  • 2005–2006
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Dallas, TX, United States
  • 2004
    • Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2000
    • Illinois State University
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 1997
    • University of Tennessee
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Knoxville, Tennessee, United States
  • 1992
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 1980
    • Columbus State University
      Columbus, Georgia, United States