Harumi Ueda

Hoshi University, Shinagawa, Tōkyō, Japan

Are you Harumi Ueda?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)6.5 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed in mucosal epithelial cells in the colon and is important for regulating fecal water content. We examined the role of AQP3 in the laxative effect of rhubarb extract. After orally administering rhubarb extract or its major component (sennoside A) to rats, the fecal water content, AQP3 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in the colon were examined. The mechanism by which sennoside A decreases the expression of AQP3 was examined using the human colon cancer HT-29 cells and macrophage-derived Raw264.7 cells. During diarrhea by rhubarb extract administration, the PGE2 levels in the colon increased while the AQP3 expression significantly decreased. Similar changes were also observed when sennoside A was administered. When sennoside A or its metabolites, rheinanthrone and rhein were added to Raw264.7 cells, a significant increase in the PGE2 concentration was observed only in cells treated with rheinanthrone. Fifteen min after adding PGE2 to the HT-29 cells, the AQP3 expression decreased to approximately 40% of the control. When pretreated with indomethacin, sennoside A neither decreased the AQP3 expression nor induced diarrhea. Sennoside A may decrease AQP3 expression in the colon to inhibit water transport from the luminal to the vascular side, leading to a laxative effect. The decreases in the levels of AQP3 are caused by rhinanthrone, which is a metabolite of sennoside A, this metabolite activates the macrophages in the colon and increases the secretion of PGE2; PGE2 acts as a paracrine factor and decreases AQP3 expression in colon mucosal epithelial cells.
    Journal of ethnopharmacology 01/2014; · 2.32 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Byakkokaninjinto (BKN) is an herbal medicine used for the relief of diuresis, thirst and dermal pruritus that are associated with diabetes. The effects of BKN on the expression of aquaporins (AQPs) in the kidney, salivary gland and skin were investigated in order to clarify the mechanism of drug action. Seven-week-old KKAy mice were given feed containing 4.5% BKN for 4 weeks. Compared with the control group, BKN administration did not affect the blood glucose and insulin concentration. However, water intake and urine volume were significantly reduced. AQP2 protein expression in the kidney inner medullary was significantly increased after BKN administration. AQP3 mRNA and protein expression in skin tissue was significantly increased after BKN administration. However, BKN administration did not affect AQP5 mRNA expression in the salivary gland. These results suggest that BKN treatment relieves diuresis, thirst, and dermal pruritis by increasing kidney AQP2 expression and skin AQP3 expression.
    Phytotherapy Research 11/2010; 25(6):897-903. · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effects of oral treatment with sodium malate, an active ingredient of Juzen-taiho-to, on the nephrotoxicity, bone marrow toxicity, hepatotoxicity and gastrointestinal toxicity caused by i.p. administration of 9 doses of 3.0 mg/kg/d cisplatin (CDDP) (on days 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11 and 12) were examined in ddY mice inoculated with sarcoma 180 (S-180) cells on day 1 of the study. The CDDP-induced increases in blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminases and relative stomach weight and the decreases in food intake and body weight were inhibited nearly to the control levels without reducing the antitumor activity of CDDP against S-180 by the oral treatment with sodium malate of 12 doses of more than the equimolar amount of CDDP (on days 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15). However, the CDDP-induced decreases in white blood cell and platelet counts and relative spleen and thymus weight could not be inhibited completely by combination with sodium malate, even at a dose of twice the equimolar amount of CDDP. The sodium malate-induced reduction of CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity was observed after oral administration, as well as with i.p., s.c. and i.v. administration, and the effect was almost the same for each route of administration. Sodium malate also reduced the toxicity induced by high doses of CDDP (4.5, 6.0, 7.5, 9.0 and 12.0 mg/kg/d) at doses of twice the equimolar amount of CDDP. Sodium malate at a dose of 10.68 mg/kg/d (twice as high as carboplatin, CBDCA) did not reduce the nephrotoxicity, bone marrow toxicity, hepatotoxicity and gastrointestinal toxicity caused by i.p. administration of 9 doses of 15.0 mg/kg/d CBDCA on days 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11 and 12 in ddY mice inoculated with sarcoma 180 (S-180) cells on day 1 of the study. From this study, it was suggested that sodium malate could become a useful agent for the reduction of CDDP-induced toxicity, particularly nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity.
    Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 02/1998; 21(1):34-43. · 1.78 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Immunopharmacology 01/1991; 13(6):733.