Gaurav Chhabra

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, NCT, India

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Publications (3)1.04 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Coagulopathy frequently occurs following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and usually occurs 6-72 hour post-trauma. The incidence and the probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and poor outcome following TBI are largely unknown and vary considerably. To assess the incidence and probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and to identify the risk factors for poor outcome in terms of median survival time following TBI. In this prospective study over two years, patients of isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (GCS≤12) admitted to trauma center had coagulation profile (PT, APTT, thrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer), arterial lactate and ABG analysis done on day of admission and on day three. Coagulopathy was defined as prothrombin time (PT) or/and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) more than 1.5 times the normal control. Incidence of in-hospital mortality was assessed in all cases. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for coagulopathy and mortality in these patients. A total of 208 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 32 ± 12 years and mean GCS was 7.1 ± 2.8. Coagulopathy was present in 46% (n = 96) of patients. Risk factors for development of coagulopathy were found out to be severity of head injury (OR: 2.81), elevated D-dimer (OR: 3.43), low hemoglobin (OR: 3.13), and effaced cisterns in the CT scan (OR: 2.72). Presence of coagulopathy (OR: 2.97) and severity of head injury (OR: 5.70) strongly predicted poor outcome, and were associated with a decreased median survival time. There is a high incidence of coagulopathy following TBI. The presence of coagulopathy as well as of severity of TBI are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality in these patients.
    Journal of Emergencies Trauma and Shock 07/2013; 6(3):180-5.
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    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Coagulation abnormalities are common in patients with head injuries. However, the effect of brain injury on fibrinogen levels has not been well studied prospectively to assess coagulation abnormalities in patients with moderate and severe head injuries and correlate these abnormalities with the neurologic outcome. Consecutive patients with moderate (Glasgow Comma Scale (GCS),9-12) and severe (GCS≤8) head injuries were the subjects of this pilot study, All patients had coagulation parameters, including plasma fibrinogen levels measured. Clinical and computed tomography (CT) scan findings and immediate clinical outcome were analyzed. Of the 100 patients enrolled, only seven (7%) patients had hypofibrinogenemia (fibrinogen ≤200 mg/dL). The head injury was moderate in two patients and severe in five patients. Fibrinogen levels showed a progressively increasing trend in four patients (three with severe head injuries and one with moderate head injury). CT scan revealed subdural hematoma in five patients; extradural hematoma in one; and subarachnoid hemorrhage in another patient. Of the seven patients, two patients died during hospital. Large-scale prospective studies are needed to assess the fibrinogen level in patients with head injury and its impact on outcome.
    Neurology India 01/2010; 58(5):756-7. · 1.04 Impact Factor