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Publications (5)26.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by fatigue. Little is known about the genesis of fatigue. Fatigue is thought to represent a multidimensional concept and it is important to be able to measure it confidently. The aims were to evaluate the reliability and validity of the 20-item Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) in SS and to search for factors associated with this disabling symptom. Forty-eight women with primary SS completed the MFI-20 questionnaire. The results were compared with age-matched women with fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy controls. Convergent construct validity was assessed by correlations to a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for global fatigue by Spearman's correlation (r(s)). Test-retest reliability was analysed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) in 28 women. Associations between clinical variables and subscales of the MFI-20 were analysed. The SS women scored significantly higher in all subscales of the MFI-20 compared to controls but similar to FM. The ICCs were satisfactory, ranging from 0.66 for general fatigue to 0.85 for the total score of MFI-20. All subscales correlated significantly to VAS for global fatigue, general fatigue showing the highest correlation (r(s) = 0.70). The estimated number of hours of sleep/day was significantly associated with many of the fatigue dimensions. All five subscales of the MFI-20 were inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure (BP) and two with systolic BP. The MFI-20 was found to be a reliable and valid tool for the measurement of fatigue in primary SS. High levels of fatigue were correlated with low BP, suggesting an associated involvement of the autonomic nervous system.
    Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 07/2009; 37(4):284-92. · 2.22 Impact Factor
  • Annals of the rheumatic diseases 03/2009; 68(2):285-6. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the frequency of osteoporosis and possible risk factors of low bone mineral density (BMD) in women with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) in western Sweden. In addition, to evaluate if adequate anti-osteoporotic treatment was provided. BMD was measured at radius, lumbar spine and hip by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). An 'expected' control BMD was calculated for each patient. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed to determine associations between BMD and demographic and disease-related variables. One hundred and sixty-three women were included. Median age was 47 (20-82) yrs, 89 (55%) were post-menopausal and 85 (52%) were taking glucocorticosteroids. BMD was significantly reduced in all measured sites compared with expected BMD. Thirty-seven (23%), 18 (11%) and 6 (4%) of the patients were osteoporotic in at least one, two and three or more measured locations. Bisphosphonates were used by 23 (27%) of patients taking glucocorticosteroids and 13 (35%) with osteoporosis. High age and low weight or BMI were associated with low BMD in all measured sites. In total hip, high SLICC/American Collage of Rheumatology (ACR), ESR and 'combinations of DMARD' were additional markers of low BMD. High S-creatinine was associated with low BMD in lumbal spine whereas high S-creatinine and CRP were markers in radius. Women with SLE are at greater risk of osteoporosis compared with controls and few are treated adequately. Factors associated with low BMD in SLE are high age and low weight but also markers of inflammation, impaired kidney function and disease damage, however glucocorticosteroids were not associated.
    Rheumatology 08/2007; 46(7):1185-90. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is known to exert a positive effect in preventing bone loss and a beneficial effect on the disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the effects of HRT on bone mineral density (BMD) and on the course of established RA. Eighty-eight postmenopausal women with RA were randomly allocated to receive HRT, vitamin D3, and calcium supplementation or vitamin D3 and calcium supplementation alone for 2 years. The effects of additional HRT on laboratory and clinical measures of disease activity, quality of life, and BMD and on radiographic joint damage were investigated. Treatment with HRT suppressed signs of inflammation as shown by reduction in erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (p = 0.025) and an elevation in hemoglobin concentration (p = 0.007), a better clinical outcome assessed by response on the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28) (p = 0.036), increased BMD in the forearm, proximal femur and spine (p < 0.01), and retarded (p = 0.026) progression of joint destruction among patients with radiological progressive disease. No significant effect on quality of life was seen. Two years of HRT in women with active RA had significant ameliorating effects on inflammation, DAS28 response, and BMD and was associated with slower progression of radiological joint destruction. The mechanisms by which HRT exerts its effects remain to be elucidated. We suggest HRT can be used in addition to conventional therapy in the management of postmenopausal patients with RA.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 08/2003; 30(7):1456-63. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate determinants of joint destruction and reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) not treated with bisphosphonates or hormone replacement therapy and to evaluate if there are common markers of erosive disease and bone loss. BMD was measured using dual x ray absorptiometry and joint damage was examined by x ray examination according to the Larsen method in 88 patients with RA. Associations between BMD and Larsen score, and between demographic and disease related variables, including proinflammatory cytokines, HLA-DR4 epitopes, and markers of bone and cartilage turnover, were examined bivariately by simple and multiple linear regression analyses. 49/88 (56%) patients had osteoporosis in at least one site. Reduced BMD and increased joint destruction were associated with: at the forearm and femoral neck, high Larsen score, low weight, and old age (R(2)=0.381, p<0.001; R(2)=0.372, p<0.001, respectively); at the total hip, low weight, high Larsen score, and dose of injected glucocorticosteroids (R(2)=0.435, p<0.001); at the lumbar spine, low weight, reduced cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and increased carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (R(2)=0.248, p<0.001). Larsen score was associated with long disease duration and increased C reactive protein (CRP) (R(2)=0.545, p<0.001). Osteoporosis is common in postmenopausal patients with RA. Low weight and high Larsen score were strongly associated with BMD reduction. Increased CRP and long disease duration were determinants of erosive disease in postmenopausal women with RA. These findings indicate common mechanisms of local and generalised bone loss in RA.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 07/2003; 62(7):617-23. · 9.11 Impact Factor