Frans Nollet

Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (120)365.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The progressive course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) results in an ever-changing spectrum of the care needs of patients with ALS. Knowledge of prognostic factors for the functional course of ALS may enhance clinical prediction and improve the timing of appropriate interventions. Our objective was to systematically review the evidence regarding prognostic factors for the rate of functional decline of patients with ALS, assessed with versions of the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS). Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of the thirteen included studies using the Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) tool. The overall quality of evidence for each prognostic factor was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, considering risk of bias, imprecision, inconsistency, indirectness, and publication bias. The quality of evidence for the prognostic value of age at onset, site of onset, time from symptom onset to diagnosis, and ALSFRS-Revised baseline score was low, mainly due to the limited data and inconsistency of results in the small number of studies included. The prognostic value of initial rate of disease progression, age at diagnosis, forced vital capacity, frontotemporal dementia, body mass index, and comorbidity remains unclear. We conclude that the current evidence on prognostic factors for functional decline in ALS is insufficient to allow the development of a prediction tool that can support clinical decisions. Given the limited data, future prognostic studies may need to focus on factors that have a predictive value for a decline in ALSFRS(-R) domain scores, preferably based on internationally collected and shared data.
    Journal of neurology. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Post--ICU clinics have been advocated to reduce long--term physical and psychological impairments among ICU survivors. A format for optimal structure, timing, and care content has not yet been established. We developed and implemented two post--ICU clinics in different hospital settings and evaluated the feasibility.
    Minerva anestesiologica 10/2014; · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To compare the content of the Fatigue Severity Scale and the subscale "subjective experience of fatigue" of the Checklist Individual Strength, and (ii) to assess the reliability of both questionnaires in polio survivors. Design: Repeated-measures at a 3-week interval. Subjects: Consecutive series of 61 polio survivors. Methods: Concepts contained in the questionnaire items were linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), using standardized linking rules. Reliability analyses included tests of internal consistency, test-retest reliability and measurement error. Results: Questionnaires differed in the extent to which they measured other than fatigue-related aspects of functioning (represented ICF components: "Body functions": 50% and 80%, "Activities and Participation": 30% and 0%, for the Fatigue Severity Scale and Checklist Individual Strength, respectively). Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were considered acceptable, while measurement error was large (Cronbach's α: 0.90 and 0.93, intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.80 and 0.85, smallest detectable change: 28.7% and 29.4% for the Fatigue Severity Scale and Checklist Individual Strength, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the acceptable clinimetric properties, we conclude that both the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Checklist Individual Strength can be applied in research on post-poliomyelitis syndrome when measuring fatigue. However, because the 2 questionnaires differ in content they cannot be used interchangeably.
    Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 06/2014; · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The timely provision of assistive devices and home adaptations (ADHA) is crucial in the management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in order to maintain their independence and relieve their caregivers. Our objective was to study the experiences of patients with ALS during the process of procuring ADHA. We sent a cross-sectional questionnaire survey addressing issues concerning the application for and provision process of ADHA to 239 patients with ALS registered at one of the three tertiary academic diagnostic centres within the Netherlands ALS Centre. One hundred and fifty-nine (89%) of the 179 responding patients (response rate 75%) had experience with the procurement process and 93 (58%) of them indicated problems in obtaining ADHA. The most reported problems were delay (42%) and the authorities' lack of disease knowledge (24%). Patients viewed these issues as the most prominent requiring improvement. In conclusion, the main problems perceived by patients indicate that increasing awareness of ALS and promoting a proactive attitude among ALS care professionals towards the application for ADHA may contribute positively to the quality of ALS care.
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration 06/2014; · 2.37 Impact Factor
  • Gait & Posture 06/2014; 39:S4. · 1.97 Impact Factor
  • Gait & Posture 06/2014; 39:S10. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To determine whether the anaerobic threshold (AT) can be identified in individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS) using submaximal incremental exercise testing, and to compare current guidelines for intensity prescription in PPS with the AT. Design A cohort study. Setting Research laboratory at a university hospital. Participants Eighty-two individuals with PPS. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measure Power output, gas exchange variables, heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured in an incremental submaximal cycle ergometry test. Two independent observers identified the AT. Comparison of current guidelines for training intensity prescription in PPS (40% to 60% HRR or an RPE of 12) with the AT was based on correlations between recommended heart rate and the heart rate at the AT. In addition, we determined the proportion of individuals that would have been recommended to train at an intensity corresponding to their AT. Results The AT could be identified in 63 (77%) of the participants. Pearson correlation coefficients between recommended heart rate and the heart rate at the AT were lower in case of 40% HRR (r=.56) and 60% HRR (r=.50) than in case of prescription based on RPE (r=.86). Based on RPE, 56% of the individuals would have been recommended to train at an intensity corresponding to their AT. This proportion was higher compared to 40% HRR (41%) or 60% HRR (18%) as criterion. Conclusions The AT can be identified in most individuals with PPS offering an individualized target for aerobic training. If the AT can not be identified, for example because gas analysis equipment is not available, intensity prescription can best be based on RPE.
    Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation 05/2014; · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS As part of a footwear trial, 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer and custom-made footwear were followed for 18 months or until ulceration. Demographic data, disease-related parameters, presence of minor lesions, barefoot and in-shoe plantar peak pressures, footwear adherence, and daily stride count were entered in a multivariate multilevel logistic regression model of plantar foot ulcer recurrence.RESULTSA total of 71 patients had a recurrent ulcer. Significant independent predictors were presence of minor lesions (odds ratio 9.06 [95% CI 2.98-27.57]), day-to-day variation in stride count (0.93 [0.89-0.99]), and cumulative duration of past foot ulcers (1.03 [1.00-1.06]). Significant independent predictors for those 41 recurrences suggested to be the result of unrecognized repetitive trauma were presence of minor lesions (10.95 [5.01-23.96]), in-shoe peak pressure <200 kPa with footwear adherence >80% (0.43 [0.20-0.94]), barefoot peak pressure (1.11 [1.00-1.22]), and day-to-day variation in stride count (0.91 [0.86-0.96]).CONCLUSIONS The presence of a minor lesion was clearly the strongest predictor, while recommended use of adequately offloading footwear was a strong protector against ulcer recurrence from unrecognized repetitive trauma. These outcomes define clear targets for diabetic foot screening and ulcer prevention.
    Diabetes care 04/2014; · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.Methods: Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.Results: Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.Discussion: Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Muscle & Nerve 04/2014; · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in 23 individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and 18 age-matched healthy individuals.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(7):e101660. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In polio survivors with calf muscle weakness, dorsiflexion-restricting ankle-foot orthoses (DR-AFOs) aim to improve gait in order to reduce walking-related problems such as instability or increased energy cost. However, evidence on the efficacy of DR-AFOs in polio survivors is lacking. We investigated the effect of DR-AFOs on gait biomechanics, walking energy cost, speed, and perceived waking ability in this patient group. Sixteen polio survivors with calf muscle weakness underwent 3D-gait analyses to assess gait biomechanics when walking with DR-AFOs and with shoes only. Ambulant registration of gas-exchange during a 6-minute walk test determined walking energy cost, and comfortable gait speed was calculated from the walked distance during this test. Perceived walking ability was assessed using purposely-designed questionnaires. Compared with shoes-only, walking with DR-AFOs significantly increased forward progression of the center of pressure (CoP) in mid-stance and it reduced ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion in mid- and terminal stance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, walking energy cost was lower (-7%, p = 0.052) and gait speed was higher (p = 0.005). Patients were significantly more satisfied, felt safer and less exhausted with the DR-AFO, compared to shoes-only (p < 0.05). DR-AFO effects varied largely across patients. Patients who walked with limited forward CoP progression and persisting knee extension during the shoes-only condition seemed to have benefitted least from the DR-AFO. In polio survivors with calf muscle weakness, DR-AFOs improved gait biomechanics, speed and perceived walking ability, compared to shoes-only. Effects may depend on the shoes-only gait pattern, therefore further study is needed to determine which patients benefit most from the DR-AFO.
    Gait & Posture. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the perceived usability and use of custom- made footwear in diabetic patients who are at high-risk for foot ulceration, and to elucidate the determinants of usability and use. Design: Survey. Subjects: A total of 153 patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, prior plantar foot ulceration and newly prescribed custom-made footwear, recruited from 10 Dutch multidisciplinary foot clinics. Methods: The Questionnaire of Usability Evaluation was used to assess the patients' perception of weight, appearance, comfort, durability, donning/doffing, stability, benefit and overall appreciation of their prescription footwear (all expressed as visual analogue scores). Data on priorities for usability and footwear use (in h/day) were obtained from patient reports. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess determinants of usability and use. Results: Median (interquartile range) score for overall appreciation was 8.3 (7.1-9.1). Scores ranged from 6.5 (4.5-8.6) for weight to 9.6 (6.3-9.9) for donning/doffing. Footwear comfort was listed most often (33.3%) as the highest priority. Footwear use was <60% of daytime (where daytime was defined as 16 h out of bed) in 58% of patients. The only significant determinant of footwear use was the perceived benefit of the footwear (p = 0.045). Conclusion: Perceived usability of footwear was mostly positive, although individual scores and priorities varied considerably. Footwear use was low to moderate and dependent only on the perceived benefit of the footwear. Therefore, practitioners should focus on enhancing the patient's ap-preciation of the therapeutic benefit of custom-made footwear.
    Journal of rehabilitation medicine: official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 12/2013; · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background / Purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), their spousal caregivers, and healthcare professionals with case management in ALS care in a cluster-randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of case management (1). Main conclusion: This qualitative exploration revealed aspects of support that are appreciated and factors for additional individual support for patients with ALS and their caregivers. The study resulted in a greater understanding of the ALS care needs from different perspectives.
    International Symposium on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Motor Neurone Disease 2013; 12/2013
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    ABSTRACT: To study the effect of case management on quality of life, caregiver strain, and perceived quality of care (QOC) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and their caregivers. We conducted a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial with the multidisciplinary ALS care team as the unit of randomization. During 12 months, patients with ALS and their caregivers received case management plus usual care or usual care alone. Outcome measures were the 40-item ALS Assessment Questionnaire (ALSAQ-40), Emotional Functioning domain (EF); the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI); and the QOC score. These measures were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 months. Case management resulted in no changes in ALSAQ-40 EF, CSI, or QOC from baseline to 12 months. ALSAQ-40 EF scores in both groups were similar at baseline and did not change over time (p = 0.331). CSI scores in both groups increased significantly (p < 0.0001). Patients with ALS from both groups rated their perceived QOC at baseline with a median score of 8, which did not change significantly during follow-up. Within the context of multidisciplinary ALS care teams, case management appears to confer no benefit for patients with ALS or their caregivers. This study provides Class III evidence that case management in addition to multidisciplinary ALS care does not significantly improve health-related quality of life of patients with ALS.
    Neurology 11/2013; · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated whether multiple developmental difficulties are more frequent in very low birth weight (VLBW) children than in those born full term. The association between multiple developmental difficulties assessed at 3½ years of age and educational provision for the child at 5½ years was also investigated, with 'educational provision' referring to the curriculum, school placement and the level of learning support. There were 143 VLBW children without cerebral palsy (CP) and 41 term-born peers assessed at 3½ years of age. The assessment included 6 measures of development: word comprehension, visual motor integration, visual perception, motor coordination, executive functioning and behaviour. Educational provision was determined at age 5½ years. A mildly abnormal score (score <1 standard deviation) was considered to indicate developmental difficulty. Scores from the six measures of development were analysed to determine the difficulty frequency and the presence of multiple difficulties (>1 difficulty score) in each child. This study showed that at 3½ years of age, the VLBW children had significantly more difficulty with motor coordination than their term-born peers. In addition, 27% of the VLBW children had multiple difficulties compared to 10% in the term-born group. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that of the difficulties, impaired motor coordination was most strongly associated with the requirement for learning support two years later. Regression analyses showed that having multiple difficulties was significantly associated with the need for learning support (Odds Ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.5-7.8). These results show that the presence of multiple difficulties in a VLBW child of preschool age, can impact the child's educational provision two years later.
    Research in developmental disabilities 11/2013; · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate whether strength decline in post-polio syndrome (PPS) results from excessive distal axonal degeneration of enlarged motor units. We assessed changes over 10years in isometric quadriceps strength, mean motor unit action potential (MUAP) size, root mean squared (RMS) amplitude, and level of interference (LOI) in 47 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls, using high density surface EMG. At baseline, all patients had symptomatic quadriceps dysfunction, evidenced by transmission defects on single-fibre EMG. MU size and strength declined significantly by 20% and 15%, respectively in patients with PPS. Those with the largest initial MU sizes exhibited the greatest losses of mean MU size (27%) and proportional decreases in quadriceps strength (23%). Initial strength, change in LOI and change in RMS amplitude together explained 35% of the variability in strength changes in patients. MU size of controls did not change, although they lost 29% strength. MU size and strength declined concomitantly in a homogeneous cohort of patients with PPS and quadriceps dysfunction. This long term follow-up study provides evidence that size diminution of enlarged MUs combined with a reduced number of active MUs contributes to the gradual strength decline in PPS.
    Clinical neurophysiology: official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology 11/2013; · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken.RESULTSOn the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk -11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44-1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk -46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15-0.99], P = 0.045).CONCLUSIONS Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended.
    Diabetes care 10/2013; · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated whether intrinsic fatigability of the muscle fibers is reduced in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This may contribute to the muscle fatigue complaints reported by patients with PPS. For this purpose, we assessed contractile properties and fatigue resistance of the knee extensor muscles using repeated isometric electrically evoked contractions in 38 patients with PPS and 19 age-matched healthy subjects. To determine whether any difference in fatigue resistance between both groups could be attributed to differences in aerobic capacity of the muscle fibers, 9 patients with PPS and 11 healthy subjects performed the same protocol under arterial occlusion. Results showed that fatigue resistance of patients with PPS was comparable to that in controls, both in the situation with intact circulation and with occluded blood flow. Together, our findings suggest that there are no differences in contractile properties and aerobic muscle capacity that may account for the increased muscle fatigue perceived in PPS.
    Neuromuscular Disorders 07/2013; · 3.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants are at increased risk for motor deficits, which may be reduced by early intervention programs. For detection of motor deficits, and to monitor intervention, different assessment tools are available. It is important to choose tools that are sensitive to evaluate the efficacy of intervention on motor outcome. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) and the Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-second edition (BSID-II) in their ability to evaluate effects of an early intervention, provided by paediatric physical therapists, on motor development in VLBW infants at 12 months corrected age (CA). DESIGN: This was a secondary study in which data collected from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) were used. METHODS: At 12 months CA, 116 of 176 VLBW infants, participating in a RCT on the effect of the Infant Behavioral Assessment and Intervention Program, were assessed with both the AIMS and the PDI. Intervention effects on the AIMS and PDI were compared. RESULTS: Corrected for baseline differences, significant intervention effects were found for AIMS and PDI scores. The highest effect size was for the AIMS subscale sit. A significant reduction of abnormal motor development in the intervention group was only found with the AIMS. LIMITATIONS: No Dutch norms are available for the AIMS. CONCLUSIONS: The responsiveness of the AIMS to detect intervention effects was better than the PDI. We therefore recommend caution with monitoring VLBW infants only with the PDI and advise to use both the AIMS and the BSID when evaluating intervention effects on motor development at 12 months CA.
    Physical Therapy 06/2013; · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates whether very low birth weight (VLBW) preschoolers experience disability in daily activities and what the risk factors for disability in daily activities are. The Dutch Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI-NL) was used to detect disability in daily activities in 143 VLBW children without cerebral palsy (CP) at 44 months of corrected age (CA). Data from the psychomotor-developmental index (PDI) and the mental developmental index (MDI) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID II) at 24 months CA, and data relating to perinatal and socio-economic status were available. Disability in daily activities was found in 27 (19%) VLBW children without CP. High frequencies of disability were found in 19 (13%) children on the mobility domain and in 12 (8%) children on the social functioning domain. The multiple logistic regression analyses showed that low BSID II outcomes (<2 SD) were risk factors for disability in the mobility domain, but not for disability in the social functioning domain. The predictive value of the BSID II outcomes is moderate, 46% of the VLBW children with a low PDI and 44% with a low MDI developed a disability in the mobility domain. This study showed a higher frequency of disability in daily activities in VLBW preschoolers compared to term born peers. Therefore, it is suggested to assess VLBW children's performance of daily activities before they start school.
    Research in developmental disabilities 04/2013; 34(7):2085-2091. · 4.41 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

876 Citations
365.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Academic Medical Center (AMC)
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1999–2014
    • University of Amsterdam
      • Faculty of Medicine AMC
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2004–2013
    • VU University Medical Center
      • • Department of Medical Humanities
      • • Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1999–2012
    • Academisch Medisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam
      • Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2009–2010
    • Medisch Centrum Haaglanden
      's-Gravenhage, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1996–2010
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
      Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands