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Publications (3)5.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main target site of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Diagnosis is based on endoscopic and histological findings. Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a Gram-negative spiral bacterium linked to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma and is frequently observed on endoscopy in patients who have undergone transplantation. The role, if any, played by HP infection in the development of acute GVHD is unknown. We conducted a retrospective study between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2008, of 338 upper GI endoscopies (gastroscopies) performed on patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with clinical suspicion of GVHD (198 patients). Acute and chronic GVHD were confirmed from histological features in 97 patients (51.3%) and 68 patients (36%), respectively. HP infection was detected in 69 patients (35%) and had a negative modulating effect on the development of acute GVHD (relative risk [RR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.79; P = .001) and chronic GVHD (RR, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.92; P = .016). Furthermore, the presence of HP was inversely correlated with the histological severity of GVHD (P = .003). Our findings suggest that infection with HP may have a negative modulating effect on GVHD.
    Biology of blood and marrow transplantation: journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation 11/2010; 17(5):765-9. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) and (67)gallium scanning ((67)Ga scan) pre-transplant as prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma, undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem-cell transplantation. Forty-two patients were included. Of these, 9 (21%) had both positive CT and (67)Ga scans, 17 (41%) negative results with both techniques, and 16 (38%) positive CT/negative (67)Ga scan. Whole-body planar imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed 72 h after an intravenous administration of (67)Ga citrate measuring between 7 mCi and 10 mCi (259-370 MBq). Patients with positive CT/positive (67)Ga scan had a significantly worse EFS and OS at 5 years than those with negative (67)Ga scan regardless of whether it was associated with a positive or a negative CT scan (29% and 16% vs. 81% and 93% vs. 88% and 100%, respectively, P < 0.001). After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 4-130 months), no differences were observed between patients with negative CT/negative (67)Ga scan and those with positive CT/negative (67)Ga scan, with an EFS and OS at 5 years of 88% versus 81% and 100% versus 93%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of a pre-transplant positive CT/(67)Ga scans adversely influenced both EFS and OS [HR 8, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.4-38), P = 0.03 and HR 2; 95% CI (1.3-8), P = 0.02, respectively]. (67)Ga scan helps to identify, in the pre-transplant evaluation, two groups with a different outcome: one group of patients with positive CT and negative (67)Ga scans pre-transplant, who showed a favorable outcome with a low rate of relapse, and the other group of patients with both positive CT and (67)Ga scans pre-transplant, who showed a poor prognosis and did not benefit from autologous stem-cell transplantation. They should have been offered other therapeutic strategies.
    Annals of Nuclear Medicine 06/2008; 22(4):251-60. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated computed tomography (CT) and Gallium-67 scanning (67Ga) before transplantation as prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) in patients with relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation. Forty-five patients were included. Of these, 10 (22%) had positive CT and 67Ga scan results, 21 (47%) had negative results of both techniques, 12 (27%) had positive CT/negative 67Ga scan results, and 2 (5%) had negative CT/positive 67Ga scan results. Patients with positive CT/67Ga scan results had a significantly worse EFS and OS at 5 years than those with negative 67Ga scan results, whether it was associated with positive or negative CT scan results (0 and 25% vs. 83% and 90% vs. 74% and 83%, respectively; P < 0.001). With a median follow-up of 59 months (range, 6-150 months), no differences were observed between patients with negative CT/67Ga scan results and those with positive CT/negative 67Ga scan results, with an EFS and OS at 5 years of 74% vs. 83% and 83% vs. 90%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of pretransplantation positive CT/67Ga scan results adversely influenced EFS and OS (hazard ratio, 39; 95% confidence interval, 8-202 [P < 0.001] and hazard ratio, 24; 95% confidence interval, 4-135 [P < 0.001], respectively). Gallium-67 scans help to identify pretransplantation CT-positive patients with a different outcome. A group of patients with positive CT/negative 67Ga scan results before transplantation who showed a favorable outcome with a low rate of relapse and another group of patients with positive CT/67Ga scan results before transplantation who showed poor prognosis did not benefit from autologous stem cell transplantation. They should be offered other therapeutic strategies.
    Clinical Lymphoma & Myeloma 12/2006; 7(3):217-25. · 1.13 Impact Factor