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Publications (4)6.01 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have demonstrated that prior infection by various bacterial pathogens induces nonspecific resistance to subsequent infection by other gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we evaluated whether underlying inflammation enhanced host resistance to inhalational Bacillus anthracis infection in New Zealand White rabbits (SPF; Bordetella- and Pasteurella-free). Accordingly, rabbits were pretreated with either the inflammagen bacterial LPS (60,000 EU/kg), a component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, or saline (vehicle). Administration of LPS resulted in brief pyrexia and a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, thus confirming LPS-induced inflammation. At 24 h after LPS treatment, rabbits were exposed to aerosolized B. anthracis spores (Ames strain; approximately 300 LD50). Blood samples collected at various times after challenge were cultured. Compared with their saline-pretreated counterparts, LPS-pretreated, B. anthracis challenged rabbits exhibited delays in 2 biomarkers of B. anthracis infection-anthrax-induced pyrexia (25 h versus 66 h after challenge, respectively) and bacteremia (26 h versus 63 h, respectively)-and survived longer (41 h versus 90 h, respectively). Similar to control animals, all LPS-pretreated, B. anthracis-challenged rabbits exhibited pathology consistent with inhalational anthrax. Taken together, these results suggest that prior or underlying stimulation of the innate immune system induces transient host resistance to subsequent B. anthracis infection in SPF New Zealand white rabbits. In particular, our results emphasize the importance of using animals that are free of underlying infections to prevent confounding data in studies for inhalational anthrax characterization and medical countermeasure evaluation.
    Comparative medicine 01/2013; 63(3):252-61. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cynomolgus macaques, immunised at the 80 μg dose level with an rF1+rV vaccine (two doses, three weeks apart), were fully protected against pneumonic plague following inhalational exposure to a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis (strain CO92) at week 8 of the schedule. At this time, all the immunised animals had developed specific IgG titres to rF1 and rV with geometric mean titres of 96.83±20.93 μg/ml and 78.59±12.07 μg/ml, respectively, for the 40 μg dose group; by comparison, the 80 μg dose group had developed titres of 114.4±22.1 and 90.8±15.8 μg/ml to rF1 and rV, respectively, by week 8. For all the immunised animals, sera drawn at week 8 competed with the neutralising and protective Mab7.3 for binding to rV antigen in a competitive ELISA, indicating that a functional antibody response to rV had been induced. All but one of the group immunised at the lower 40 μg dose-level were protected against infection; the single animal which succumbed had significantly reduced antibody responses to both the rF1 and rV antigens. Although a functional titre to rV antigen was detected for this animal, this was insufficient for protection, indicating that there may have been a deficiency in the functional titre to rF1 and underlining the need for immunity to both vaccine antigens to achieve protective efficacy against plague. This candidate vaccine, which has been evaluated as safe and immunogenic in clinical studies, has now been demonstrated to protect cynomolgus macaques, immunised in the clinical regimen, against pneumonic plague.
    Vaccine 06/2011; 29(29-30):4771-7. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The natural history for inhalational Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain) exposure in New Zealand white rabbits was investigated to better identify potential, early biomarkers of anthrax. Twelve SPF Bordetella-free rabbits were exposed to 150 LD(50) aerosolized B. anthracis spores, and clinical signs, body temperature, complete blood count, bacteremia, and presence of protective antigen in the blood (that is, antigenemia) were examined. The development of antigenemia and bacteremia coincided and preceded both pyrexia and inversion of the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of infection. Antigenemia was determined within 1 h by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, compared with the 24-h traditional culture needed for bacteremia determination. Rabbits appeared clinically normal until shortly before succumbing to anthrax approximately 47 h after challenge or approximately 22 h after antigenemia, which suggests a relatively narrow therapeutic window of opportunity. To evaluate the therapeutic rabbit model, B. anthracis-exposed rabbits were treated (after determination of antigenemia and later confirmed to be bacteremic) intravenously with the fluoroquinolone antibiotic levofloxacin for 5 d at a total daily dose of 25 or 12.5 mg/kg, resulting in nearly 90% and 70% survival, respectively, to the study end (28 d after challenge). The peak level for 12.5 mg/kg was equivalent to that observed for a 500-mg daily levofloxacin dose in humans. These results suggest that intravenous levofloxacin is an effective therapeutic against inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our findings indicate that antigenemia is a viable and early biomarker for B. anthracis infection that can be used as a treatment trigger to allow for timely intervention against this highly pathogenic disease.
    Comparative medicine 01/2010; 60(6):461-8. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The efficacy of the UK candidate plague vaccine was established in the cynomolgus macaque model for pneumonic plague. Animals were vaccinated intramuscularly on days 0 and 21 with either 40 g F1 + 40 g V or 80 g F1 + 80 g V in 0.5 ml 20% v/v Alhydrogel. They were challenged on day 60 with a lethal aerosol challenge (> 100 LD50) of CO 92 Y. pestis. All but one of the 19 vaccinated animals that were challenged survived.
    05/2004;