Christopher P Nelson

University of Leicester, Leiscester, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (72)771.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Runs of homozygosity (ROHs) are recognized signature of recessive inheritance. Contributions of ROHs to the genetic architecture of coronary artery disease and regulation of gene expression in cells relevant to atherosclerosis are not known. Our combined analysis of 24,320 individuals from 11 populations of white European ethnicity showed an association between coronary artery disease and both the count and the size of ROHs. Individuals with coronary artery disease had approximately 0.63 (95% CI: 0.4-0.8) excess of ROHs when compared to coronary-artery-disease-free control subjects (p = 1.49 × 10(-9)). The average total length of ROHs was approximately 1,046.92 (95% CI: 634.4-1,459.5) kb greater in individuals with coronary artery disease than control subjects (p = 6.61 × 10(-7)). None of the identified individual ROHs was associated with coronary artery disease after correction for multiple testing. However, in aggregate burden analysis, ROHs favoring increased risk of coronary artery disease were much more common than those showing the opposite direction of association with coronary artery disease (p = 2.69 × 10(-33)). Individual ROHs showed significant associations with monocyte and macrophage expression of genes in their close proximity-subjects with several individual ROHs showed significant differences in the expression of 44 mRNAs in monocytes and 17 mRNAs in macrophages when compared to subjects without those ROHs. This study provides evidence for an excess of homozygosity in coronary artery disease in outbred populations and suggest the potential biological relevance of ROHs in cells of importance to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.06.001 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.
    PLoS Genetics 07/2015; 11(7):e1005230. DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005230 · 8.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk are unclear. We aimed to assess this association by studying genetic variants that have been shown to associate with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). If the association between diabetes and CAD is causal, we expected to observe an association of these variants with CAD as well. We studied all genetic variants currently known to be associated with T2DM at a genome-wide significant level (p < 5*10(-8)) in CARDIoGRAM, a genome-wide data-set of CAD including 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. Out of the 44 published T2DM SNPs 10 were significantly associated with CAD in CARDIoGRAM (OR>1, p < 0.05), more than expected by chance (p = 5.0*10(-5)). Considering all 44 SNPs, the average CAD risk observed per individual T2DM risk allele was 1.0076 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9973-1.0180). Such average risk increase was significantly lower than the increase expected based on i) the published effects of the SNPs on T2DM risk and ii) the effect of T2DM on CAD risk as observed in the Framingham Heart Study, which suggested a risk of 1.067 per allele (p = 7.2*10(-10) vs. the observed effect). Studying two risk scores based on risk alleles of the diabetes SNPs, one score using individual level data in 9856 subjects, and the second score on average effects of reported beta-coefficients from the entire CARDIoGRAM data-set, we again observed a significant - yet smaller than expected - association with CAD. Our data indicate that an association between type 2 diabetes related SNPs and CAD exists. However, the effects on CAD risk appear to be by far lower than what would be expected based on the effects of risk alleles on T2DM and the effect of T2DM on CAD in the epidemiological setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
    Atherosclerosis 06/2015; 241(2):419-426. DOI:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.05.033 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adiposity, as indicated by body mass index (BMI), has been associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases in epidemiological studies. We aimed to investigate if these associations are causal, using Mendelian randomization (MR) methods. The associations of BMI with cardiovascular outcomes [coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure and ischaemic stroke], and associations of a genetic score (32 BMI single nucleotide polymorphisms) with BMI and cardiovascular outcomes were examined in up to 22 193 individuals with 3062 incident cardiovascular events from nine prospective follow-up studies within the ENGAGE consortium. We used random-effects meta-analysis in an MR framework to provide causal estimates of the effect of adiposity on cardiovascular outcomes. There was a strong association between BMI and incident CHD (HR = 1.20 per SD-increase of BMI, 95% CI, 1.12-1.28, P = 1.9·10(-7)), heart failure (HR = 1.47, 95% CI, 1.35-1.60, P = 9·10(-19)) and ischaemic stroke (HR = 1.15, 95% CI, 1.06-1.24, P = 0.0008) in observational analyses. The genetic score was robustly associated with BMI (β = 0.030 SD-increase of BMI per additional allele, 95% CI, 0.028-0.033, P = 3·10(-107)). Analyses indicated a causal effect of adiposity on development of heart failure (HR = 1.93 per SD-increase of BMI, 95% CI, 1.12-3.30, P = 0.017) and ischaemic stroke (HR = 1.83, 95% CI, 1.05-3.20, P = 0.034). Additional cross-sectional analyses using both ENGAGE and CARDIoGRAMplusC4D data showed a causal effect of adiposity on CHD. Using MR methods, we provide support for the hypothesis that adiposity causes CHD, heart failure and, previously not demonstrated, ischaemic stroke. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.
    International Journal of Epidemiology 05/2015; 44(2). DOI:10.1093/ije/dyv094 · 9.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, individually these explain only a small fraction of the heritability of CAD and for most, the causal biological mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to obtain further insights into potential causal processes of CAD by integrating large-scale GWA data with expertly curated databases of core human pathways and functional networks. Using pathways (gene sets) from Reactome, we carried out a 2-stage gene set enrichment analysis strategy. From a meta-analyzed discovery cohort of 7 CAD genome-wide association study data sets (9889 cases/11 089 controls), nominally significant gene sets were tested for replication in a meta-analysis of 9 additional studies (15 502 cases/55 730 controls) from the Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) Consortium. A total of 32 of 639 Reactome pathways tested showed convincing association with CAD (replication P<0.05). These pathways resided in 9 of 21 core biological processes represented in Reactome, and included pathways relevant to extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity, innate immunity, axon guidance, and signaling by PDRF, NOTCH, and the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD receptor complex. Many of these pathways had strengths of association comparable to those observed in lipid transport pathways. Network analysis of unique genes within the replicated pathways further revealed several interconnected functional and topologically interacting modules representing novel associations (eg, semaphoring-regulated axonal guidance pathway) besides confirming known processes (lipid metabolism). The connectivity in the observed networks was statistically significant compared with random networks (P<0.001). Network centrality analysis (degree and betweenness) further identified genes (eg, NCAM1, FYN, FURIN, etc.) likely to play critical roles in the maintenance and functioning of several of the replicated pathways. These findings provide novel insights into how genetic variation, interpreted in the context of biological processes and functional interactions among genes, may help define the genetic architecture of CAD. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 05/2015; 35(7). DOI:10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305513 · 5.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using a genome-wide screen of 9.6 million genetic variants achieved through 1000 Genomes Project imputation in 62,166 samples, we identify association to lipid traits in 93 loci, including 79 previously identified loci with new lead SNPs and 10 new loci, 15 loci with a low-frequency lead SNP and 10 loci with a missense lead SNP, and 2 loci with an accumulation of rare variants. In six loci, SNPs with established function in lipid genetics (CELSR2, GCKR, LIPC and APOE) or candidate missense mutations with predicted damaging function (CD300LG and TM6SF2) explained the locus associations. The low-frequency variants increased the proportion of variance explained, particularly for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total cholesterol. Altogether, our results highlight the impact of low-frequency variants in complex traits and show that imputation offers a cost-effective alternative to resequencing.
    Nature Genetics 05/2015; DOI:10.1038/ng.3300 · 29.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lack of reproducibility is an ongoing problem in some areas of the biomedical sciences. Poor experimental design and a failure to engage with experienced statisticians at key stages in the design and analysis of experiments are two factors that contribute to this problem. The RIPOSTE (Reducing IrreProducibility in labOratory STudiEs) framework has been developed to support early and regular discussions between scientists and statisticians in order to improve the design, conduct and analysis of laboratory studies and, therefore, reduce irreproducibility. The framework is intended for using during the early stages of a research project, when specific questions or hypotheses are proposed. The essential points within the framework are explained and illustrated using three examples (a medical equipment test, a macrophage study and a gene expression study). Sound study design minimises the possibility of bias being introduced into experiments and leads to higher quality research with more reproducible results.
    eLife Sciences 05/2015; 4. DOI:10.7554/eLife.05519 · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) gene is expressed primarily in the kidney and may contribute to hypertension. However, the biologic mechanisms underlying the association between FGF1 and BP regulation remain unknown. We report that the major allele of FGF1 single nucleotide polymorphism rs152524 was associated in a dose-dependent manner with systolic BP (P=9.65×10(-5)) and diastolic BP (P=7.61×10(-3)) in a meta-analysis of 14,364 individuals and with renal expression of FGF1 mRNA in 126 human kidneys (P=9.0×10(-3)). Next-generation RNA sequencing revealed that upregulated renal expression of FGF1 or of each of the three FGF1 mRNA isoforms individually was associated with higher BP. FGF1-stratified coexpression analysis in two separate collections of human kidneys identified 126 FGF1 partner mRNAs, of which 71 and 63 showed at least nominal association with systolic and diastolic BP, respectively. Of those mRNAs, seven mRNAs in five genes (MME, PTPRO, REN, SLC12A3, and WNK1) had strong prior annotation to BP or hypertension. MME, which encodes an enzyme that degrades circulating natriuretic peptides, showed the strongest differential coexpression with FGF1 between hypertensive and normotensive kidneys. Furthermore, higher level of renal FGF1 expression was associated with lower circulating levels of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides. These findings indicate that FGF1 expression in the kidney is at least under partial genetic control and that renal expression of several FGF1 partner genes involved in the natriuretic peptide catabolism pathway, renin-angiotensin cascade, and sodium handling network may explain the association between FGF1 and BP. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 04/2015; DOI:10.1681/ASN.2014121211 · 9.47 Impact Factor
  • Christopher P Nelson · Heribert Schunkert · Nilesh J Samani · Clett Erridge
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are genetically predisposed to enhanced production of the type-I interferon IFN-α and are also at elevated risk of developing atherosclerosis compared with healthy subjects. We aimed to test whether genetic predisposition to increased type-I IFN production affects risk of coronary artery disease. Using a list of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms from the results of genome-wide association studies for systemic lupus erythematosus, which we hypothesised would be enriched in variants that regulate type-I IFN production, we identified a genetic risk score based on 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10516487, rs3131379 and rs7574865), which correlated significantly with production of IFN-α by human peripheral leukocytes stimulated with CpG-oligonucleotide (n=60, P=1.50×10(-5)). These single nucleotide polymorphisms explained 27.8% of variation in the CpG-oligonucleotide-induced IFN-α response and were also associated with Toll-like receptor-7/8- and Toll-like receptor-9-dependent IFN-α and IFN-β responses, but were not associated with inflammatory cytokine production in response to Toll-like receptor-4 stimulation or risk of coronary artery disease in 22 233 cases and 64 762 controls (odds ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.98-1.02) using Mendelian randomization-based analyses. Coronary artery disease risk was also not associated with the full panel of 11 systemic lupus erythematosus single nucleotide polymorphisms or loci responsible for the monogenic type-I interferonopathies Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation. The results argue against the potential utility of drugs targeting type-I IFN production for coronary artery disease. The use of genetic variants that modify leukocyte signaling pathways, rather than circulating biomarkers, as instruments in Mendelian randomization analyses may be useful for studies investigating causality of other candidate pathways of atherogenesis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 04/2015; 35(6). DOI:10.1161/ATVBAHA.114.304925 · 5.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. Methods We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested the association between a change in genetically determined height of 1 SD (6.5 cm) with the risk of CAD in 65,066 cases and 128,383 controls. Using individual-level genotype data from 18,249 persons, we also examined the risk of CAD associated with the presence of various numbers of height-associated alleles. To identify putative mechanisms, we analyzed whether genetically determined height was associated with known cardiovascular risk factors and performed a pathway analysis of the height-associated genes. Results We observed a relative increase of 13.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4 to 22.1; P<0.001) in the risk of CAD per 1-SD decrease in genetically determined height. There was a graded relationship between the presence of an increased number of height-raising variants and a reduced risk of CAD (odds ratio for height quar-tile 4 versus quartile 1, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.84; P<0.001). Of the 12 risk factors that we studied, we observed significant associations only with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (accounting for approximately 30% of the association). We identified several overlapping pathways involving genes associated with both development and atherosclerosis. Conclusions There is a primary association between a genetically determined shorter height and an increased risk of CAD, a link that is partly explained by the association between shorter height and an adverse lipid profile. Shared biologic processes that determine achieved height and the development of atherosclerosis may explain some of the association. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 04/2015; 372(17). DOI:10.1056/NEJMoa1404881 · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background To investigate potential cardiovascular and other eff ects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of infl ammation.
    The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology 03/2015; 11. DOI:10.1016/S2213-8587(15)00034-0 · 9.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality, is a complex thrombotic disorder with environmental and genetic determinants. Although several genetic variants have been found associated with VTE, they explain a minor proportion of VTE risk in cases. We undertook a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) to identify additional VTE susceptibility genes. Twelve GWASs totaling 7,507 VTE case subjects and 52,632 control subjects formed our discovery stage where 6,751,884 SNPs were tested for association with VTE. Nine loci reached the genome-wide significance level of 5 × 10(-8) including six already known to associate with VTE (ABO, F2, F5, F11, FGG, and PROCR) and three unsuspected loci. SNPs mapping to these latter were selected for replication in three independent case-control studies totaling 3,009 VTE-affected individuals and 2,586 control subjects. This strategy led to the identification and replication of two VTE-associated loci, TSPAN15 and SLC44A2, with lead risk alleles associated with odds ratio for disease of 1.31 (p = 1.67 × 10(-16)) and 1.21 (p = 2.75 × 10(-15)), respectively. The lead SNP at the TSPAN15 locus is the intronic rs78707713 and the lead SLC44A2 SNP is the non-synonymous rs2288904 previously shown to associate with transfusion-related acute lung injury. We further showed that these two variants did not associate with known hemostatic plasma markers. TSPAN15 and SLC44A2 do not belong to conventional pathways for thrombosis and have not been associated to other cardiovascular diseases nor related quantitative biomarkers. Our findings uncovered unexpected actors of VTE etiology and pave the way for novel mechanistic concepts of VTE pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 03/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.01.019 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies and candidate-gene based approaches have identified multiple common variants associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, the independent contribution of these individual loci to disease risk is modest. To investigate the cumulative effects of genetic variants previously associated with SCD risk. A total of 966 SCD cases from the Oregon-Sudden Unexpected Death Study and 1,926 coronary artery disease controls from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium were investigated. We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) for each trait composed of variants previously associated with SCD or with abnormalities in specific electrocardiographic traits such as QRS duration, QTc interval and heart rate. GRSs were calculated using a weighted approach based on the number of risk alleles weighted by the beta coefficients derived from the original studies. We also compared the highest and lowest quintiles for the GRS composed of SCD SNPs. Increased cumulative risk was observed for a GRS composed of 14 SCD-SNPs (OR=1.17 [1.05-1.29], P = 0.002). The risk for SCD was 1.5 fold higher in the highest quintile when compared to the lowest quintile (OR = 1.46[1.11-1.92]). We did not observe significant associations with SCD for SNPs that determine electrocardiographic traits. A modest but significant effect on SCD risk was identified for a GRS composed of 14 previously associated SCD SNPs. While next generation sequencing methodology will continue to identify additional novel variants, these findings represent proof of concept for the additive effects of gene variants on SCD risk.
    03/2015; 7. DOI:10.1016/j.ijcha.2015.03.001
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    ABSTRACT: Observational studies have reported different effects of adiposity on cardiovascular risk factors across age and sex. Since cardiovascular risk factors are enriched in obese individuals, it has not been easy to dissect the effects of adiposity from those of other risk factors. We used a Mendelian randomization approach, applying a set of 32 genetic markers to estimate the causal effect of adiposity on blood pressure, glycemic indices, circulating lipid levels, and markers of inflammation and liver disease in up to 67,553 individuals. All analyses were stratified by age (cutoff 55 years of age) and sex. The genetic score was associated with BMI in both nonstratified analysis (P = 2.8 × 10(-107)) and stratified analyses (all P < 3.3 × 10(-30)). We found evidence of a causal effect of adiposity on blood pressure, and fasting levels of insulin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in a nonstratified analysis and in the <55-year stratum. Further, we found evidence of a smaller causal effect on total cholesterol (P for difference = 0.015) in the ≥55-year stratum than in the <55-year stratum, a finding that could be explained by biology, survival bias, or differential medication. In conclusion, this study extends previous knowledge of the effects of adiposity by providing sex- and age-specific causal estimates on cardiovascular risk factors. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
    Diabetes 02/2015; 64(5). DOI:10.2337/db14-0988 · 8.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Smoking is a major risk factor in many diseases. Genome wide association studies have linked genes for nicotine dependence and smoking behavior to increased risk of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and malignant diseases. We conducted an epigenome wide association study in peripheral-blood DNA in 464 individuals (22 current smokers and 263 ex-smokers), using the Human Methylation 450K array. Upon replication in an independent sample of 356 twins (41 current and 104 ex-smokers), we identified 30 probes in 15 distinct loci, all of which reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis P< 5 × 10(-8). All but one probe (cg17024919) remained significant after adjusting for blood cell counts. We replicated all nine known loci and found an independent signal at CPOX near GPR15. In addition, we found six new loci at PRSS23, AVPR1B, PSEN2, LINC00299, RPS6KA2, and KIAA0087. Most of the lead probes (13 out of 15) associated with cigarette smoking, overlapped regions of open chromatin (FAIRE and DNaseI hypersensitive sites) or / and H3K27Ac peaks (ENCODE data set), which mark regulatory elements. The effect of smoking on DNA methylation was partially reversible upon smoking cessation for longer than 3 months. We report the first statistically significant interaction between a SNP (rs2697768) and cigarette smoking on DNA methylation (cg03329539). We provide evidence that the metSNP for cg03329539 regulates expression of the CHRND gene located circa 95 kb downstream of the methylation site. Our findings suggest the existence of dynamic, reversible site-specific methylation changes in response to cigarette smoking , which may contribute to the extended health risks associated with cigarette smoking.
    Epigenetics: official journal of the DNA Methylation Society 09/2014; 9(10). DOI:10.4161/15592294.2014.969637 · 5.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), a key enzyme in catecholamine metabolism, is implicated in cardiovascular, sympathetic, and endocrine pathways. This study aimed to confirm preliminary association of COMT genetic variation with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). It further aimed to evaluate whether aspirin, a commonly used CVD prevention agent, modified the potential association of COMT with incident CVD.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 07/2014; 34(9). DOI:10.1161/ATVBAHA.114.303845 · 5.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The majority of the heritability of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unexplained, despite recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in identifying novel susceptibility loci. Integrating functional genomic data from a variety of sources with a large-scale meta-analysis of CAD GWAS may facilitate the identification of novel biological processes and genes involved in CAD, as well as clarify the causal relationships of established processes. Towards this end, we integrated 14 GWAS from the CARDIoGRAM Consortium and two additional GWAS from the Ottawa Heart Institute (25,491 cases and 66,819 controls) with 1) genetics of gene expression studies of CAD-relevant tissues in humans, 2) metabolic and signaling pathways from public databases, and 3) data-driven, tissue-specific gene networks from a multitude of human and mouse experiments. We not only detected CAD-associated gene networks of lipid metabolism, coagulation, immunity, and additional networks with no clear functional annotation, but also revealed key driver genes for each CAD network based on the topology of the gene regulatory networks. In particular, we found a gene network involved in antigen processing to be strongly associated with CAD. The key driver genes of this network included glyoxalase I (GLO1) and peptidylprolyl isomerase I (PPIL1), which we verified as regulatory by siRNA experiments in human aortic endothelial cells. Our results suggest genetic influences on a diverse set of both known and novel biological processes that contribute to CAD risk. The key driver genes for these networks highlight potential novel targets for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions.
    PLoS Genetics 07/2014; 10(7):e1004502. DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004502 · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) complicating ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) impacts outcome, particularly in patients surviving to discharge. Resuscitated CA complicating STEMI is associated with increased inpatient mortality. The impact on later prognosis is unclear. We analysed data from the UK Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project for STEMI patients admitted during January 2008-March 2010. We used survival analyses to assess the independent impact of resuscitated CA during the index episode on inhospital, 30 days, 1 year and medium term all-cause mortality. Of 48 749 STEMI patients, 5308 (10.9%) were recorded as having a CA. Of these, 1557 (29.3%) died on the day of CA. In survivors, after covariate adjustment, resuscitated CA was associated with increased risk of death during the index admission (HR 4.05 (3.69 to 4.45) p<0.001). In patients surviving to discharge, a history of resuscitated CA was associated with increased risk of death to 30 days (HR 1.53 (1.18 to 2.00), p<0.001). However, beyond 30 days, resuscitated CA was not associated with increased mortality risk (1-year HR 0.95 (0.79 to 1.14, p=0.596); 3.5 years HR 0.90 (0.78 to 1.04), p=0.144). The influence of resuscitated CA on inhospital or 30-day mortality was similar whether CA occurred before or after hospital admission. Where the resuscitated CA rhythm was asystole, inhospital mortality was higher compared with ventricular arrhythmia (p<0.001) or pulseless electrical activity (p=0.011). Late resuscitated CA (occurring after the day of index STEMI) was associated with higher 30-day postdischarge mortality compared with early resuscitated CA (p=0.023). STEMI complicated by resuscitated CA merits careful monitoring in the early period postevent. In contemporary practice, there is no impact of resuscitated CA on longer-term prognosis.
    Heart (British Cardiac Society) 04/2014; 100(14). DOI:10.1136/heartjnl-2014-305696 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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Publication Stats

2k Citations
771.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2015
    • University of Leicester
      • • Department of Cardiovascular Sciences
      • • Department of Health Sciences
      Leiscester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2014
    • NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research
      Oxford, England, United Kingdom
  • 2011
    • University of Leeds
      • Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes
      Leeds, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • Universität zu Lübeck
      • Institut für Medizinische Biometrie und Statistik
      Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany