Brian T Kloss

State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York, United States

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Publications (22)2.35 Total impact

  • Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2013; 46(3). DOI:10.1016/j.jemermed.2013.08.045 · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extension of primary lung tumors into the left atrium via pulmonary veins is a well-documented phenomenon. Peripheral arterial embolism and cerebral embolism originating from a primary lung neoplasm are rare events. We report a case of simultaneous acute bilateral lower limb ischemia, bilateral renal infarction, splenic infarction and cerebral infarction as a result of multiple emboli originating from primary lung malignancy invasion of the left atrium. An emergent embolectomy revealed pathologic features of the extracted thrombus that were identical to the pulmonary neoplasm.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 06/2012; 5(1):27. DOI:10.1186/1865-1380-5-27
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    Brian T Kloss, David M Hart, Lalainia Secreti
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    ABSTRACT: Migration is a rare complication of venticuloperitoneal shunts and is thought to be associated with the "memory" of the plastic tubing and the windlass effect of neck flexion and extension. The purpose of this case report is to detail a very rare case of complete distal to proximal shunt migration.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 03/2012; 5(1):15. DOI:10.1186/1865-1380-5-15
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: Internal carotid intracranial aneurysms are a relatively rare form of intracranial aneurysm that presents with diplopia, retro-orbital pain and unilateral headaches. The symptoms are progressive and the diagnosis should be considered in a patient presenting with these complaints. Underlying hypertension and advanced age are specific risk factors.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 09/2011; 4:56. DOI:10.1186/1865-1380-4-56
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: Squamous cell carcinoma is a common cancer to the head and neck region that is typically diagnosed when it is 2 cm in size. This case report illustrates a patient who had neglected an auricular carcinoma for over a year. At the time of presentation the entire ear was infected with pseudomonas and yeast and chronic friability and bleeding caused an anemia which required blood transfusion.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 08/2011; 4:50. DOI:10.1186/1865-1380-4-50
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    ABSTRACT: Mahaim fiber tachycardia is an uncommon cause of palpitations among the pediatric population. This case report describes an adolescent female who presented with recurrent episodes of tachycardia with chest pain and dizziness. Her ECG showed tachycardia with wide QRS complexes and left bundle branch block pattern. Repeat ECG after adenosine treatment revealed sinus rhythm with persistence of the left bundle branch block pattern. Metoprolol was started however she continued to have episodes of sustained tachycardia.Electrophysiologic study then confirmed the diagnosis of Mahaim fiber tachycardia. Treatment was successful with mapping of the accessory pathways followed by radiofrequency ablation.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 03/2011; 4:9. DOI:10.1186/1865-1380-4-9
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    ABSTRACT: Perforation of a Meckel diverticulum (MD) is a rare complication that can often mimic appendicitis. This case report identifies a child who presented to our Emergency Department (ED) with right lower quadrant abdominal pain, free fluid and air in the abdomen and pelvis, and inflammatory changes visualized on Ultrasonography (US) and computer tomography (CT) scan. In our patient, ruptured appendicitis was suspected, and the diagnosis of ruptured MD was ultimately made by laparoscopy. This case demonstrates that a healthy degree of suspicion for complicated MD should be present when dealing with a questionable diagnosis of appendicitis, particularly in the pediatric population.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):455-7. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0213-9
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    Brian T Kloss, Richard E Lagace
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):511-2. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0230-8
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    Brian T Kloss, Rahul Patel, Jennifer Mackey
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):523-4. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0246-0
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    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):481-2. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0171-2
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    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):483-4. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0174-z
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    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):501-2. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0212-x
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    Nicholas E Nacca, Brian T Kloss
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):515. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0236-2
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    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):519-20. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0243-3
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    Brian T Kloss, Rahul Patel
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):521-2. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0245-1
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    Brian T Kloss, Joseph Morgan
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):527-8. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0251-3
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    ABSTRACT: Chest pain is a common presenting symptom of cocaine users to the emergency department that requires a thorough work up. Pneumomediastinum is an uncommon complication of cocaine abuse that occurs more commonly when cocaine is smoked, but can also occur when cocaine is nasally insufflated. Our case report presents a patient with pneumomediastinum secondary to cocaine insufflation and reviews the necessary diagnostic tests that must be performed to rule out secondary pneumomediastinum, a severe life-threatening condition. Our case is unique, as it is one of a few reported cases of pneumomediastinum occurring after the use of intranasal cocaine.
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):435-7. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0205-9
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    Brian T Kloss, Shaheena R Patierno
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 12/2010; 3(4):487-8. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0181-0
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    Brian T Kloss
    International Journal of Emergency Medicine 09/2010; 3(3):203. DOI:10.1007/s12245-010-0178-8
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    Derek R Cooney, Brian Kloss
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    ABSTRACT: Fractures of the clavicle are extremely common, representing 2.6-12% of all fractures and 35-44% of all shoulder girdle injuries; 69-82% of these fractures occur in the middle third of the clavicle. Vascular injuries relating to clavicle fracture are usually due to extreme force applied to the clavicle in an acute setting. No other reports of delayed subclavian vein laceration were found on literature search. We present this case to increase awareness among emergency physicians of the potential delayed presentation of this rare condition. A 21-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with acute swelling of the base of the neck after carrying a heavy load on his left shoulder the night before. He had been recovering from a clavicle fracture for 2 months. Malunion of his left midshaft clavicle fracture led to subclavian vein injury and formation of a large hematoma secondary to reinjury that occurred at work the night before presentation. Computed tomography revealed a 9-cm hematoma at the fracture site. The patient was found to have a subclavian vein injury without evidence of arterial injury or nervous system involvement. The patient was admitted for observation and subsequently discharged without need for surgical intervention. Subclavian vein laceration is a rare complication of clavicle fracture. Patient education at discharge after conservative management is important due to the risk of vascular complications from malunion and reinjury.
    Journal of Emergency Medicine 08/2010; 43(4):648-50. DOI:10.1016/j.jemermed.2010.05.022 · 1.18 Impact Factor