Birgitte Hass Esberg

Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Central Jutland, Denmark

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Publications (2)7.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To determine if the addition of a multinutrient human milk fortifier to mother's milk while breastfeeding very preterm infants after hospital discharge is possible and whether it influences first-year growth. Of a cohort of 320 infants (gestational age: 24-32 weeks; birth weight: 535-2255 g), breastfed infants (65% [n = 207]) were randomly assigned shortly before hospital discharge to receive either unfortified (n = 102, group A) or fortified (n = 105, group B) mother's milk until 4 months' corrected age (CA). The remaining infants were bottle-fed with a preterm formula (group C). Follow-up was performed at term and at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months' CA. Mean duration of breastfeeding after term was not significantly different between groups A and B (11.8 and 10.6 weeks, respectively). Weight, length, and head circumference were not significantly different between groups A and B at 12 months' CA. Compared with groups A and B, infants in group C had a higher increase in weight z score until term and in length z score until 6 months' CA. At 12 months' CA, boys in group C were significantly longer and heavier compared with those in groups A and B, whereas girls in group C were longer and heavier compared with those in group A only. A higher protein intake was related to a higher serum urea nitrogen level and growth. Fortification of mother's milk after hospital discharge while breastfeeding very preterm infants was possible without influencing breastfeeding duration but did not significantly influence growth parameters at 1 year of age compared with unfortified mother's milk.
    PEDIATRICS 03/2011; 127(4):e995-e1003. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether a cow's milk-based human milk fortifier (HMF) added to mother's milk while breastfeeding or a cow's milk-based preterm formula compared to exclusively mother's milk after hospital discharge, increases the incidence of developing allergic diseases among very preterm infants (VPI) during the first year of life. Of a cohort of 324 VPI (gestational age 24-32 wk), the exclusively breastfed VPI were shortly before discharge randomized to breastfeeding without fortification or supplementing with a fortifier. Those not breastfed were fed a preterm formula. The intervention period was from discharge until 4 months corrected age (CA). Follow-up was performed at 4 and 12 months CA including specific IgE to a panel of allergens at 4 months CA. The incidence during and prevalence at 12 months CA of recurrent wheezing (RW) was 39.2% and 32.7%, while atopic dermatitis (AD) was 18.0% and 12.1%, respectively. Predisposition to allergic disease increased the risk of developing AD (p=0.04) [OR 2.6 (95% CI 1.0-6.4)] and the risk of developing RW (p=0.02) [OR 2.7 (95% CI 1.2-6.3)]. Boys had an increased risk of developing RW (p=0.003) [OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.5-6.5)]. No difference was found between nutrition groups. None developed food allergy. Compared to exclusively breastfed, VPI supplemented with HMF or fed exclusively a preterm formula for 4 months did not have an increased risk of developing allergic diseases during the first year of life.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 02/2011; 22(5):515-20. · 3.38 Impact Factor