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Publications (1)0.9 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have investigated the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism and various cardiovascular risk factors in different populations with varied results. Currently, the association of ACE gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome has not been studied in North Indians. While studies assessing the effect with polymorphism on each of the components of metabolic syndrome separately are present, data regarding the metabolic syndrome per se are sparse. The present study evaluated the effect of ACE gene I/D polymorphism in patients with metabolic syndrome in North Indian population at a tertiary care centre. Fifty subjects, with thirty cases of metabolic syndrome (NCEP/ATP III guidelines, 2004) and twenty age and gender matched healthy controls were chosen. Detailed history was reviewed and clinical examination of the subjects was carried out. Relevant investigations including blood glucose (fasting and post prandial), blood urea, serum creatinine and serum lipids were done. DNA of cases and controls was analysed for I/D polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction. D/D genotype was more frequent in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared with healthy controls (P < 0.05). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was significantly higher in the D/D genotype than I/D and I/I genotypes (P < 0.05). Our study also showed positive association between obesity, fasting blood glucose and ACE gene polymorphism while no association was found with triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. The I/I group was significantly associated with waist circumference and fasting blood glucose (P < 0.05). Our study clearly showed that metabolic syndrome was associated with ACE gene polymorphism. However due to less number of subjects in the study further studies are needed to corroborate our results.
    Chinese medical journal 01/2011; 124(1):45-8. · 0.90 Impact Factor