Annie Ouellet

Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (43)71.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and prenatal exposure to oxidative stress are thought to lead to increased risks of cardiovascular disease later in life. The objective of the present study was to document whether cord blood oxidative stress biomarkers vary with the severity of IUGR and of vascular disease in the twin pregnancy model in which both foetuses share the same maternal environment. Methods: This prospective cohort study involved dichorionic twin pairs, with one co- twin with IUGR. Oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in venous cord blood samples from each neonate of 32 twin pairs, and compared, according to severity of IUGR (IUGR <5th percentile), Doppler anomalies of the umbilical artery and early onset IUGR (in the second trimester) of the growth restricted twin. Results: Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins (oxLDL) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were increased proportionally in cases of severe IUGR. OxLDL concentrations were also increased in cases of IUGR with Doppler anomaly. Conclusion: Our data indicate that severe IUGR, is related to a derangement in redox balance, illustrated by increased venous cord blood oxydative stress biomarkers concentrations. Severe IUGR and IUGR with abnormal Doppler can be translated into conditions with intense oxidative stress.
    08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To review the biological effects and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the obstetric patient and to review procedural issues, indications, and contraindications for obstetrical MRI. Outcomes: This guideline is intended to reassure patients and clinicians of the safety of MRI in pregnancy and to provide a framework for its use. Evidence: Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline in 2013 using controlled vocabulary and key words (e.g., MRI, safety, pregnancy). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English and in French. There were no date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to July 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. Values: The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Benefits, harms, and costs: This article is intended to reassure obstetric care providers that if used in an appropriate manner without the use of contrast agents, MRI in the obstetrical patient is safe for mother and fetus in the second and third trimesters. Because obstetrical MRI is expensive and has limited availability in Canada, this clinical guideline is intended to encourage the judicious use of this resource. Summary Statements 1. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging is safe at 3.0 tesla or less during the second and third trimesters. (II-2) 2. It is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving a gadolinium contrast agent. (III) Recommendations 1. Use of magnetic resonance imaging during the first trimester of pregnancy should be restricted to maternal indications for which the information is considered clinically imperative. Inadvertent exposure to magnetic resonance imaging during the first trimester has not been associated with any long-term sequelae and should not raise clinical concern. (III-C) 2. Gadolinium contrast may be used in pregnant women when the benefits outweigh the potential risks. (III-C).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 04/2014; 36(4):349-55.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assist clinicians in assigning gestational age based on ultrasound biometry. Outcomes: To determine whether ultrasound dating provides more accurate gestational age assessment than menstrual dating with or without the use of ultrasound. To provide maternity health care providers and researchers with evidence-based guidelines for the assignment of gestational age. To determine which ultrasound biometric parameters are superior when gestational age is uncertain. To determine whether ultrasound gestational age assessment is cost effective. Evidence: Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or MEDLINE and The Cochrane Library in 2013 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (gestational age, ultrasound biometry, ultrasound dating). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies written in English. There were no date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to July 31, 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. Values: The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Benefits, harms, and costs: Accurate assignment of gestational age may reduce post-dates labour induction and may improve obstetric care through allowing the optimal timing of necessary interventions and the avoidance of unnecessary ones. More accurate dating allows for optimal performance of prenatal screening tests for aneuploidy. A national algorithm for the assignment of gestational age may reduce practice variations across Canada for clinicians and researchers. Potential harms include the possible reassignment of dates when significant fetal pathology (such as fetal growth restriction or macrosomia) result in a discrepancy between ultrasound biometric and clinical gestational age. Such reassignment may lead to the omission of appropriate-or the performance of inappropriate-fetal interventions. Summary Statements 1. When performed with quality and precision, ultrasound alone is more accurate than a "certain" menstrual date for determining gestational age in the first and second trimesters (≤ 23 weeks) in spontaneous conceptions, and it is the best method for estimating the delivery date. (II) 2. In the absence of better assessment of gestational age, routine ultrasound in the first or second trimester reduces inductions for post-term pregnancies. (I) 3. Ideally, every pregnant woman should be offered a first-trimester dating ultrasound; however, if the availability of obstetrical ultrasound is limited, it is reasonable to use a second-trimester scan to assess gestational age. (I) 4. Notwithstanding Summary Statements 1, 2, and 3, women vary greatly in their awareness of their internal functions, including ovulation, and this self-knowledge can sometimes be very accurate. (III) Recommendations 1. First-trimester crown-rump length is the best parameter for determining gestational age and should be used whenever appropriate. (I-A) 2. If there is more than one first-trimester scan with a mean sac diameter or crown-rump length measurement, the earliest ultrasound with a crown-rump length equivalent to at least 7 weeks (or 10 mm) should be used to determine the gestational age. (III-B) 3. Between the 12th and 14th weeks, crown-rump length and biparietal diameter are similar in accuracy. It is recommended that crown-rump length be used up to 84 mm, and the biparietal diameter be used for measurements > 84 mm. (II-1A) 4. Although transvaginal ultrasound may better visualize early embryonic structures than a transabdominal approach, it is not more accurate in determining gestational age. Crown-rump length measurement from either transabdominal or transvaginal ultrasound may be used to determine gestational age. (II-1C) 5. If a second- or third-trimester scan is used to determine gestational age, a combination of multiple biometric parameters (biparietal diameter, head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length) should be used to determine gestational age, rather than a single parameter. (II-1A) 6. When the assignment of gestational age is based on a third-trimester ultrasound, it is difficult to confirm an accurate due date. Follow-up of interval growth is suggested 2 to 3 weeks following the ultrasound. (III-C).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 02/2014; 36(2):171-81.
  • Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 02/2014; 36(2):184-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To develop a new strategy of predicting spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) by combination of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) assessment and inflammatory proteins detection in vaginal secretions. Methods: Prospective study of 87 women referred for cervical length assessment with a standardized TVUS combined to vaginal secretions sampling. Samples were analyzed for presence of 10 cytokines. Main outcome was sPTB (<37 weeks of gestation). Associations were assessed with the chi-square, Fisher's exact test (p < 0.05) and Wald's logistic regression. Results: sPTB occurred in 25.3% of women at a median gestational age of 35.6 weeks of gestation. Short cervix (<25 mm) (n = 24) was associated with sPTB (p < 0.01) as interleukine (IL)-1β, IL-8 and IL-10 in vaginal secretions (p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, short cervix and IL-8 in vaginal secretions were independently associated with sPTB (OR 3.58 (95%CI 1.02; 12.61) and 14.55 (95%CI 1.64; 128.83), respectively) as their combination (OR 4.33 (95%CI 1.25; 14.95)). By categorizing cervical length by presence of IL-8, sPTB occurred in 55.6% of women with a short inflamed cervix. Conclusion: COLIBRI study used a novel, single-step method of vaginal secretions sampling during TVUS and demonstrated that combination of short cervix and IL-8 in vaginal secretions is a promising sPTB predictive test.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 11/2013; · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is an obstetrical complication, which by definition would screen in 10% of fetuses in the general population. The challenge is to identify the subset of pregnancies affected with pathological growth restriction in order to allow intervention that would decrease morbidity and mortality. Objective: The purpose of this guideline is to provide summary statements and recommendations and to establish a framework for screening, diagnosis, and management of pregnancies affected with IUGR. Methods: Affected pregnancies are compared with pregnancies in which the fetus is at an appropriate weight for its gestational age. History, physical examination, and laboratory investigations including biochemical markers and ultrasound characteristics of IUGR are reviewed, and a management strategy is suggested. Evidence: Published literature in English was retrieved through searches of PubMed or MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in January 2013 using appropriate controlled vocabulary via MeSH terms (fetal growth restriction and small for gestational age) and key words (fetal growth, restriction, growth retardation, IUGR, low birth weight, small for gestational age). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. Values: The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Benefits, harms, and costs: Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase clinician recognition of IUGR and guide intervention where appropriate. Optimal long-term follow-up of neonates diagnosed as IUGR may improve their long-term health. Summary Statements 1. The definition of small-for-gestational age for a fetus in utero is an estimated fetal weight that measures < 10th percentile on ultrasound. This diagnosis does not necessarily imply pathologic growth abnormalities, and may simply describe a fetus at the lower end of the normal range. (III) 2. Intrauterine growth restriction refers to a fetus with an estimated fetal weight < 10th percentile on ultrasound that, because of a pathologic process, has not attained its biologically determined growth potential. (III) A clinical estimation of fetal weight or symphysis-fundal height has poor sensitivity and specificity and should not be relied upon to diagnose intrauterine growth restriction. Intrauterine growth restriction should be considered in the differential diagnosis when the fetus is found to be small for gestational age. (II-1) 3. Effective screening for intrauterine growth restriction requires accurate dating and includes a review of the mother's menstrual history, relevant assisted reproductive technology information, and either a first trimester or early second trimester dating ultrasound. (I) 4. Symphysis-fundal height determination is of limited value in routine obstetrical care, but continues to be the only physical examination screening test available. (I) 5. Fetal weight determination in fetuses between the 10th and 90th percentiles by ultrasound biometry alone has at least a 10% error rate across gestation, but is effective equally when measuring with abdominal circumference alone or in combination with head size (biparietal diameter or head circumference) and/or femur length to establish an estimated fetal weight. (II-2) 6. Determining whether intrauterine growth restriction is symmetric or asymmetric is of less clinical importance than careful re-evaluation of fetal anatomy and uterine and umbilical artery Doppler studies. (I) 7. In women with risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction, uterine artery Doppler screening at 19 to 23 weeks may identify pregnancies at risk of antepartum stillbirth and preterm delivery due to intrauterine growth restriction and placental disease. (II-2) 8. In pregnancies in which intrauterine growth restriction due to uteroplacental vascular insufficiency is diagnosed, maternal surveillance for the development of severe preeclampsia with adverse features is warranted. (II-1) 9. Once surveillance of a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction is instituted, umbilical artery Doppler studies and biophysical profile scoring can be used as short-term predictors of fetal well-being. (I) 10. In the presence of abnormal umbilical artery Doppler studies, further investigation of the fetal circulatory system by Doppler examination of the middle cerebral artery, ductus venosus, and umbilical vein can be considered. (II-2) 11. For a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction, the decision for obstetrical intervention, including Caesarean section, in cases of abnormal fetal heart rate or malpresentation is largely based on fetal viability, as assessed by ultrasound. (II-2) 12. Maternal surveillance for the development of preeclampsia is warranted. (II-2) Recommendations 1. Women should be screened for clinical risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction by means of a complete history. (II-2B) 2. Women should be counselled on smoking cessation at any time during pregnancy. (II-2A) 3. First and second trimester screening tests for aneuploidy maybe useful tests of placental function. If two screening test results are abnormal, health care providers should be aware that the fetus is at increased risk of preterm intrauterine growth restriction and associated stillbirth. (II-1A) 4. If intrauterine growth restriction is suspected, further assessment can assist in making the diagnosis. If available, detailed ultrasound examination of the placenta (looking for evidence of a small, thickened placenta, or abnormal morphology) and uterine artery Dopplers should be considered at 19 to 23 weeks. In the absence of available diagnostic testing, closer surveillance should be offered. A maternal-fetal medicine consultation can be considered if the placenta appears abnormal on ultrasound, especially in the context of a growth-restricted fetus and abnormal uterine artery Doppler. In a rural setting, the caregiver needs to decide whether the patient should be delivered immediately, or whether transfer to a tertiary centre is appropriate. A telephone consultation and telemedicine may help. (II-2A) 5. In women without risk factors for intrauterine growth restriction, comprehensive third trimester ultrasound examination including biophysical profile, fetal biometry, amniotic fluid volume, and umbilical artery Doppler studies is not recommended. (II-2D) 6. Low-dose aspirin should be recommended to women with a previous history of placental insufficiency syndromes including intrauterine growth restriction and preeclampsia. It should be initiated between 12 and 16 weeks' gestation and continued until 36 weeks. (I-A) 7. Low-dose aspirin should also be recommended to women with two or more current risk factors in pregnancy including, but not limited to, pre-gestational hypertension, obesity, maternal age > 40 years, history of use of artificial reproductive technology, pre-gestational diabetes mellitus (type I or II), multiple gestation, previous history of placental abruption, and previous history of placental infarction. It should be initiated between 12 and 16 weeks' gestation and continued until 36 weeks. (I-A) 8. Umbilical artery Doppler studies are not recommended as a routine screening test in uncomplicated pregnancies. (I-E) 9. An ultrasound examination for estimated fetal weight and amniotic fluid volume should be considered after 26 weeks if the symphysis-fundal height measurement in centimetres deviates by 3 or more from the gestational age in weeks or there is a plateau in symphysis-fundal height. (II-2B) 10. In cases in which the fetus measures < 10th percentile by estimated fetal weight or abdominal circumference measurement, the underlying cause of intrauterine growth restriction may be established by an enhanced ultrasound examination to include a detailed review of fetal anatomy, placental morphology, and Doppler studies of the uterine and umbilical arteries. (II-2A) 11. In cases of intrauterine growth restriction, determination of amniotic fluid volume should be performed to aid in the differential diagnosis of intrauterine growth restriction and increase the accuracy of the diagnosis of placental insufficiency. (II-2B) 12. Umbilical artery Doppler should be performed in all fetuses with an estimated fetal weight or an abdominal circumference < 10th percentile. (I-A) 13. In pregnancies affected by intrauterine growth restriction, umbilical artery Doppler studies after 24 weeks may prompt intervention that reduces perinatal mortality and severe perinatal morbidity due to intrauterine growth restriction. (I-A) 14. In pregnancies in which intrauterine growth restriction has been identified, invasive testing to rule out aneuploidy may be offered where fetal abnormalities are suspected, soft markers are seen, or no supportive evidence of underlying placental insufficiency is evident. (II-2A) 15. In patients presenting with intrauterine growth restriction, maternal screening for infectious etiology may be considered. (II-2A) 16. When intrauterine growth restriction is diagnosed, surveillance should be initiated. Serial ultrasound estimation of fetal weight (every 2 weeks), along with umbilical artery Doppler studies should be initiated. If available, a placental assessment and other Doppler studies such as middle cerebral artery, umbilical vein, and ductus venosis can be performed. Increased frequency of surveillance may be required. (II-2A) 17. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 08/2013; 35(8):741-8.
  • Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology 09/2012; 40(S1). · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate (1) the effect on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening rates of having a specialized clinic for pregnant women offering blood sampling and screening for GDM, and (2) the impact on perinatal outcomes of having early GDM screening and follow-up provided by the specialized clinic. We performed a retrospective cohort study, based on electronic health records. We compared data from women who delivered during a period when the Blood Sampling in Pregnancy (BSP) clinic was operating (2008-2009; n = 2780) to a time period before the clinic was established (2006-2007; n = 2591). During the 2008-2009 period, we compared data from women who had GDM screening in the first trimester with women who had screening during the second trimester and with women who were not screened. Following the creation of the BSP clinic, overall GDM screening rates reached 72.4% in 2008-2009, compared with 48.9% in 2006-2007 (P < 0.001) and GDM screening was more likely to be performed in the first trimester (36.7% vs. 0.4%; P < 0.001). During the period when the BSP clinic was operating (2008-2009), women who had GDM screening in the first trimester had lower rates of Caesarean section (15.7% vs. 22.1%; P < 0.001) and neonatal complications (bradycardia: 3.6% vs. 6.8%; P = 0.003; respiratory distress: 9.6% vs. 13.2%; P = 0.02; and admission to NICU: 15.4% vs. 26.8%; P < 0.001) than women who did not perform GDM screening. In our population, creation of a clinic offering specialized care to pregnant women improved GDM screening rates. With the support of the BSP clinic, women who had early GDM screening were less likely to undergo Caesarean section and their offspring had fewer perinatal complications.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 03/2012; 34(3):236-42.
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    ABSTRACT: To review the literature with respect to the use of diagnostic ultrasound in the management of twin pregnancies. To make recommendations for the best use of ultrasound in twin pregnancies. Reduction in perinatal mortality and morbidity and short- and long-term neonatal morbidity in twin pregnancies. Optimization of ultrasound use in twin pregnancies. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library in 2008 and 2009 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., twin, ultrasound, cervix, prematurity) and key words (e.g., acardiac, twin, reversed arterial perfusion, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, amniotic fluid). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. Studies were restricted to those with available English or French abstracts or text. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to September 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Diagnostic Imaging Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, with input from members of the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee and the Genetics Committee of the SOGC. The recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The benefit expected from this guideline is facilitation and optimization of the use of ultrasound in twin pregnancy. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. There are insufficient data to make recommendations on repeat anatomical assessments in twin pregnancies. Therefore, a complete anatomical survey at each scan may not be needed following a complete and normal assessment. (III) 2. There are insufficient data to recommend a routine preterm labour surveillance protocol in terms of frequency, timing, and optimal cervical length thresholds. (II-2) 3. Singleton growth curves currently provide the best predictors of adverse outcome in twins and may be used for evaluating growth abnormalities. (III) 4. It is suggested that growth discordance be defined using either a difference (20 mm) in absolute measurement in abdominal circumference or a difference of 20% in ultrasound-derived estimated fetal weight. (II-2) 5. Although there is insufficient evidence to recommend a specific schedule for ultrasound assessment of twin gestation, most experts recommend serial ultrasound assessment every 2 to 3 weeks, starting at 16 weeks of gestation for monochorionic pregnancies and every 3 to 4 weeks, starting from the anatomy scan (18 to 22 weeks) for dichorionic pregnancies. (II-1) 6. Umbilical artery Doppler may be useful in the surveillance of twin gestations when there are complications involving the placental circulation or fetal hemodynamic physiology. (II-2) 7. Although many methods of evaluating the level of amniotic fluid in twins (deepest vertical pocket, single pocket, amniotic fluid index) have been described, there is not enough evidence to suggest that one method is more predictive than the others of adverse pregnancy outcome. (II-3) 8. Referral to an appropriate high-risk pregnancy centre is indicated when complications unique to twins are suspected on ultrasound. (II-2) These complications include: 1. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome 2. Monoamniotic twins gestation 3. Conjoined twins 4. Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence 5. Single fetal death in the second or third trimester 6. Growth discordance in monochorionic twins. Recommendations 1. All patients who are suspected to have a twin pregnancy on first trimester physical examination or who are at risk (e.g., pregnancies resulting from assisted reproductive technologies) should have first trimester ultrasound performed. (II-2A) 2. Every attempt should be made to determine and report amnionicity and chorionicity when a twin pregnancy is identified. (II-2A) 3. Although the accuracy in confirmation of gestational age at the first and second trimester is comparable, dating should be done with first trimester ultrasound. (II-2A) 4. Beyond the first trimester, it is suggested that a combination of parameters rather than a single parameter should be used to confirm gestational age. (II-2C) 5. When twin pregnancy is the result of in vitro fertilization, accurate determination of gestational age should be made from the date of embryo transfer. (II-1A) 6. There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation of which fetus (when discordant for size) to use to date a twin pregnancy. However, to avoid missing a situation of early intrauterine growth restriction in one twin, most experts agree that the clinician may consider dating pregnancy using the larger fetus. (III-C) 7. In twin pregnancies, aneuploidy screening using nuchal transluscency measurements should be offered. (II-2B) 8. Detailed ultrasound examination to screen for fetal anomalies should be offered, preferably between 18 and 22 weeks' gestation, in all twin pregnancies. (II-2B) 9. When ultrasound is used to screen for preterm birth in a twin gestation, endovaginal ultrasound measurement of the cervical length should be performed. (II-2A) 10. Increased fetal surveillance should be considered when there is either growth restriction diagnosed in one twin or significant growth discordance. (II-2A) 11. Umbilical artery Doppler should not be routinely offered in uncomplicated twin pregnancies. (I-E) 12. For defining oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios, the ultrasonographer should use the deepest vertical pocket in either sac: oligohydramnios when < 2 cm and polyhydramnios when > 8 cm. (II-2B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 10/2011; 115(1):117–118.
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    ABSTRACT: We verified whether oxidative stress indices (oxidized low-density lipoproteins and malondialdehyde) and inflammatory biomarkers (circulating C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-α, serum amyloid A and soluble intercellular vascular cell adhesion molecule) are increased in the umbilical vein of placental insufficiency induced intra-uterine growth restricted neonates. The prospective cohort study, involving 3 tertiary care centers, consists of 200 consecutively recruited pregnant women carrying twins. We chose the twin pregnancy model because both fetuses share the same maternal environment, thereby avoiding potential confounding factors when comparing oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers. We analysed only twin pairs with one with intra-uterine growth restriction (N=38) defined as fetal growth<10th percentile with abnormal Doppler of the umbilical artery. Blood samples were taken at birth from the umbilical vein. Intra-pair comparisons on the biomarkers were performed using the Student paired t-test. We observed increased cord blood levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins, (2.394 ± .412 vs 1.296 ± .204, p=.003) but not of malondialdehyde in growth restricted neonates when compared to their normal counterparts. Although indices of inflammation tended to be increased in cord blood from growth restricted newborns, the difference did not reach statistical significance. In the twin model, intra-uterine growth restriction is associated with low-density lipoprotein oxidation without apparent dysregulation of inflammation biomarkers. Increased oxidized low-density lipoproteins are observed in growth restricted twins compared to their co-twins with normal growth at birth.
    European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology 02/2011; 156(1):46-9. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - AMER J OBSTET GYNECOL. 01/2011; 204(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Pre-eclampsia is a leading cause of maternal deaths. These deaths mainly result from eclampsia, uncontrolled hypertension, or systemic inflammation. We developed and validated the fullPIERS model with the aim of identifying the risk of fatal or life-threatening complications in women with pre-eclampsia within 48 h of hospital admission for the disorder. We developed and internally validated the fullPIERS model in a prospective, multicentre study in women who were admitted to tertiary obstetric centres with pre-eclampsia or who developed pre-eclampsia after admission. The outcome of interest was maternal mortality or other serious complications of pre-eclampsia. Routinely reported and informative variables were included in a stepwise backward elimination regression model to predict the adverse maternal outcome. We assessed performance using the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Standard bootstrapping techniques were used to assess potential overfitting. 261 of 2023 women with pre-eclampsia had adverse outcomes at any time after hospital admission (106 [5%] within 48 h of admission). Predictors of adverse maternal outcome included gestational age, chest pain or dyspnoea, oxygen saturation, platelet count, and creatinine and aspartate transaminase concentrations. The fullPIERS model predicted adverse maternal outcomes within 48 h of study eligibility (AUC ROC 0·88, 95% CI 0·84-0·92). There was no significant overfitting. fullPIERS performed well (AUC ROC >0·7) up to 7 days after eligibility. The fullPIERS model identifies women at increased risk of adverse outcomes up to 7 days before complications arise and can thereby modify direct patient care (eg, timing of delivery, place of care), improve the design of clinical trials, and inform biomedical investigations related to pre-eclampsia. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction; Preeclampsia Foundation; International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research; and Child and Family Research Institute.
    The Lancet 01/2011; 377(9761):219-27. · 39.06 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - AMER J OBSTET GYNECOL. 01/2011; 204(1).
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    ABSTRACT: We hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and soluble TNF-α receptor 2 (sTNF-R2) co-play a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Correlation of H(2)O(2) and sTNF-R2 was assessed in vivo in maternal blood and placenta, and in vitro in cytotrophoblasts culture. We showed a positive correlation between increased levels of H(2)O(2) and sTNF-R2 early at 10-15 gestational weeks and at term in maternal serum, and in placenta of women with preeclampsia. Our in vitro experiments showed that H(2)O(2) induced the placental synthesis of sTNF-R2. We propose to consider H(2)O(2) and sTNF-R2 as potential biomarkers in predicting preeclampsia.
    Hypertension in Pregnancy 12/2010; 31(3):357-66. · 0.93 Impact Factor
  • Diabetes care 11/2010; 33(11):e145; author reply e146. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectiveTo review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients.OutcomesOutcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality.EvidenceLiterature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.ValuesThe evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.Benefits, Harms, and CostsImplementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible.
    International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. 08/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: To review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients. Outcomes: Outcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Literature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 08/2010; 110(2):167-73. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review the principles of prenatal diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and to describe the outcomes of the affected pregnancies. Effective management of fetal infection following primary and secondary maternal CMV infection during pregnancy. Neonatal signs include intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), microcephaly, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, jaundice, chorioretinitis, thrombocytopenia and anemia, and long-term sequelae consist of sensorineural hearing loss, mental retardation, delay of psychomotor development, and visual impairment. These guidelines provide a framework for diagnosis and management of suspected CMV infections. Medline was searched for articles published in English from 1966 to 2009, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (congenital CMV infection) and key words (intrauterine growth restriction, microcephaly). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. RECOMMENDATIONS The quality of evidence reported in this document has been assessed using the evaluation of evidence criteria in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). 1. Diagnosis of primary maternal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in pregnancy should be based on de-novo appearance of virus-specific IgG in the serum of a pregnant woman who was previously seronegative, or on detection of specific IgM antibody associated with low IgG avidity. (II-2A) 2. In case of primary maternal infection, parents should be informed about a 30% to 40% risk for intrauterine transmission and fetal infection, and a risk of 20% to 25% for development of sequelae postnatally if the fetus is infected. (II-2A) 3. The prenatal diagnosis of fetal CMV infection should be based on amniocentesis, which should be done at least 7 weeks after presumed time of maternal infection and after 21 weeks of gestation. This interval is important because it takes 5 to 7 weeks following fetal infection and subsequent replication of the virus in the kidney for a detectable quantity of the virus to be secreted to the amniotic fluid. (II-2A) 4. The diagnosis of secondary infection should be based on a significant rise of IgG antibody titre with or without the presence of IgM and high IgG avidity. In cases of proven secondary infection, amniocentesis may be considered, but the risk-benefit ratio is different because of the low transmission rate. (III-C) 5. Following a diagnosis of fetal CMV infection, serial ultrasound examinations should be performed every 2 to 4 weeks to detect sonographic abnormalities, which may aid in determining the prognosis of the fetus, although it is important to be aware that the absence of sonographic findings does not guarantee a normal outcome. (II-2B) 6. Quantitative determination of CMV DNA in the amniotic fluid may assist in predicting the fetal outcome. (II-3B) 7. Routine screening of pregnant women for CMV by serology testing is currently not recommended. (III-B) 8. Serologic testing for CMV may be considered for women who develop influenza-like illness during pregnancy or following detection of sonographic findings suggestive of CMV infection. (III-B) 9. Seronegative health care and child care workers may be offered serologic monitoring during pregnancy. Monitoring may also be considered for seronegative pregnant women who have a young child in day care. (III-B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 04/2010; 32(4):348-54.
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    ABSTRACT: To review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients. Outcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Literature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible. 1. Periodic health examinations and other appointments for gynaecologic care prior to pregnancy offer ideal opportunities to raise the issue of weight loss before conception. Women should be encouraged to enter pregnancy with a BMI < 30 kg/m(2), and ideally < 25 kg/m(2). (III-B). 2. BMI should be calculated from pre-pregnancy height and weight. Those with a pre-pregnancy BMI > 30 kg/m(2) are considered obese. This information can be helpful in counselling women about pregnancy risks associated with obesity. (II-2B). 3. Obese pregnant women should receive counselling about weight gain, nutrition, and food choices. (II-2B). 4. Obese women should be advised that they are at risk for medical complications such as cardiac disease, pulmonary disease, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, and obstructive sleep apnea. Regular exercise during pregnancy may help to reduce some of these risks. (II-2B). 5. Obese women should be advised that their fetus is at an increased risk of congenital abnormalities, and appropriate screening should be done. (II-2B). 6. Obstetric care providers should take BMI into consideration when arranging for fetal anatomic assessment in the second trimester. Anatomic assessment at 20 to 22 weeks may be a better choice for the obese pregnant patient. (II-2B). 7. Obese pregnant women have an increased risk of Caesarean section, and the success of vaginal birth after Caesarean section is decreased. (II-2B). 8. Antenatal consultation with an anaesthesiologist should be considered to review analgesic options and to ensure a plan is in place should a regional anaesthetic be chosen. (III-B). 9. The risk of venous thromboembolism for each obese woman should be evaluated. In some clinical situations, consideration for thromboprophylaxis should be individualized. (III-B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 02/2010; 32(2):165-73.

Publication Stats

213 Citations
71.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2012
    • Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke
      Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada
  • 2010–2011
    • Université de Sherbrooke
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada
    • Kingston College
      Kingston, New York, United States
  • 2009
    • Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada