Annie Ouellet

Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (37)68.19 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To develop a new strategy of predicting spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) by combination of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) assessment and inflammatory proteins detection in vaginal secretions. Methods: Prospective study of 87 women referred for cervical length assessment with a standardized TVUS combined to vaginal secretions sampling. Samples were analyzed for presence of 10 cytokines. Main outcome was sPTB (<37 weeks of gestation). Associations were assessed with the chi-square, Fisher's exact test (p < 0.05) and Wald's logistic regression. Results: sPTB occurred in 25.3% of women at a median gestational age of 35.6 weeks of gestation. Short cervix (<25 mm) (n = 24) was associated with sPTB (p < 0.01) as interleukine (IL)-1β, IL-8 and IL-10 in vaginal secretions (p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, short cervix and IL-8 in vaginal secretions were independently associated with sPTB (OR 3.58 (95%CI 1.02; 12.61) and 14.55 (95%CI 1.64; 128.83), respectively) as their combination (OR 4.33 (95%CI 1.25; 14.95)). By categorizing cervical length by presence of IL-8, sPTB occurred in 55.6% of women with a short inflamed cervix. Conclusion: COLIBRI study used a novel, single-step method of vaginal secretions sampling during TVUS and demonstrated that combination of short cervix and IL-8 in vaginal secretions is a promising sPTB predictive test.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 11/2013; · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate (1) the effect on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening rates of having a specialized clinic for pregnant women offering blood sampling and screening for GDM, and (2) the impact on perinatal outcomes of having early GDM screening and follow-up provided by the specialized clinic. We performed a retrospective cohort study, based on electronic health records. We compared data from women who delivered during a period when the Blood Sampling in Pregnancy (BSP) clinic was operating (2008-2009; n = 2780) to a time period before the clinic was established (2006-2007; n = 2591). During the 2008-2009 period, we compared data from women who had GDM screening in the first trimester with women who had screening during the second trimester and with women who were not screened. Following the creation of the BSP clinic, overall GDM screening rates reached 72.4% in 2008-2009, compared with 48.9% in 2006-2007 (P < 0.001) and GDM screening was more likely to be performed in the first trimester (36.7% vs. 0.4%; P < 0.001). During the period when the BSP clinic was operating (2008-2009), women who had GDM screening in the first trimester had lower rates of Caesarean section (15.7% vs. 22.1%; P < 0.001) and neonatal complications (bradycardia: 3.6% vs. 6.8%; P = 0.003; respiratory distress: 9.6% vs. 13.2%; P = 0.02; and admission to NICU: 15.4% vs. 26.8%; P < 0.001) than women who did not perform GDM screening. In our population, creation of a clinic offering specialized care to pregnant women improved GDM screening rates. With the support of the BSP clinic, women who had early GDM screening were less likely to undergo Caesarean section and their offspring had fewer perinatal complications.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 03/2012; 34(3):236-42.
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    ABSTRACT: To review the literature with respect to the use of diagnostic ultrasound in the management of twin pregnancies. To make recommendations for the best use of ultrasound in twin pregnancies. Reduction in perinatal mortality and morbidity and short- and long-term neonatal morbidity in twin pregnancies. Optimization of ultrasound use in twin pregnancies. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library in 2008 and 2009 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., twin, ultrasound, cervix, prematurity) and key words (e.g., acardiac, twin, reversed arterial perfusion, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, amniotic fluid). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. Studies were restricted to those with available English or French abstracts or text. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to September 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Diagnostic Imaging Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, with input from members of the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee and the Genetics Committee of the SOGC. The recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The benefit expected from this guideline is facilitation and optimization of the use of ultrasound in twin pregnancy. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. There are insufficient data to make recommendations on repeat anatomical assessments in twin pregnancies. Therefore, a complete anatomical survey at each scan may not be needed following a complete and normal assessment. (III) 2. There are insufficient data to recommend a routine preterm labour surveillance protocol in terms of frequency, timing, and optimal cervical length thresholds. (II-2) 3. Singleton growth curves currently provide the best predictors of adverse outcome in twins and may be used for evaluating growth abnormalities. (III) 4. It is suggested that growth discordance be defined using either a difference (20 mm) in absolute measurement in abdominal circumference or a difference of 20% in ultrasound-derived estimated fetal weight. (II-2) 5. Although there is insufficient evidence to recommend a specific schedule for ultrasound assessment of twin gestation, most experts recommend serial ultrasound assessment every 2 to 3 weeks, starting at 16 weeks of gestation for monochorionic pregnancies and every 3 to 4 weeks, starting from the anatomy scan (18 to 22 weeks) for dichorionic pregnancies. (II-1) 6. Umbilical artery Doppler may be useful in the surveillance of twin gestations when there are complications involving the placental circulation or fetal hemodynamic physiology. (II-2) 7. Although many methods of evaluating the level of amniotic fluid in twins (deepest vertical pocket, single pocket, amniotic fluid index) have been described, there is not enough evidence to suggest that one method is more predictive than the others of adverse pregnancy outcome. (II-3) 8. Referral to an appropriate high-risk pregnancy centre is indicated when complications unique to twins are suspected on ultrasound. (II-2) These complications include: 1. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome 2. Monoamniotic twins gestation 3. Conjoined twins 4. Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence 5. Single fetal death in the second or third trimester 6. Growth discordance in monochorionic twins. Recommendations 1. All patients who are suspected to have a twin pregnancy on first trimester physical examination or who are at risk (e.g., pregnancies resulting from assisted reproductive technologies) should have first trimester ultrasound performed. (II-2A) 2. Every attempt should be made to determine and report amnionicity and chorionicity when a twin pregnancy is identified. (II-2A) 3. Although the accuracy in confirmation of gestational age at the first and second trimester is comparable, dating should be done with first trimester ultrasound. (II-2A) 4. Beyond the first trimester, it is suggested that a combination of parameters rather than a single parameter should be used to confirm gestational age. (II-2C) 5. When twin pregnancy is the result of in vitro fertilization, accurate determination of gestational age should be made from the date of embryo transfer. (II-1A) 6. There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation of which fetus (when discordant for size) to use to date a twin pregnancy. However, to avoid missing a situation of early intrauterine growth restriction in one twin, most experts agree that the clinician may consider dating pregnancy using the larger fetus. (III-C) 7. In twin pregnancies, aneuploidy screening using nuchal transluscency measurements should be offered. (II-2B) 8. Detailed ultrasound examination to screen for fetal anomalies should be offered, preferably between 18 and 22 weeks' gestation, in all twin pregnancies. (II-2B) 9. When ultrasound is used to screen for preterm birth in a twin gestation, endovaginal ultrasound measurement of the cervical length should be performed. (II-2A) 10. Increased fetal surveillance should be considered when there is either growth restriction diagnosed in one twin or significant growth discordance. (II-2A) 11. Umbilical artery Doppler should not be routinely offered in uncomplicated twin pregnancies. (I-E) 12. For defining oligohydramnios and polyhydramnios, the ultrasonographer should use the deepest vertical pocket in either sac: oligohydramnios when < 2 cm and polyhydramnios when > 8 cm. (II-2B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 10/2011; 115(1):117–118.
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    ABSTRACT: We verified whether oxidative stress indices (oxidized low-density lipoproteins and malondialdehyde) and inflammatory biomarkers (circulating C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-α, serum amyloid A and soluble intercellular vascular cell adhesion molecule) are increased in the umbilical vein of placental insufficiency induced intra-uterine growth restricted neonates. The prospective cohort study, involving 3 tertiary care centers, consists of 200 consecutively recruited pregnant women carrying twins. We chose the twin pregnancy model because both fetuses share the same maternal environment, thereby avoiding potential confounding factors when comparing oxidative stress and inflammation biomarkers. We analysed only twin pairs with one with intra-uterine growth restriction (N=38) defined as fetal growth<10th percentile with abnormal Doppler of the umbilical artery. Blood samples were taken at birth from the umbilical vein. Intra-pair comparisons on the biomarkers were performed using the Student paired t-test. We observed increased cord blood levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins, (2.394 ± .412 vs 1.296 ± .204, p=.003) but not of malondialdehyde in growth restricted neonates when compared to their normal counterparts. Although indices of inflammation tended to be increased in cord blood from growth restricted newborns, the difference did not reach statistical significance. In the twin model, intra-uterine growth restriction is associated with low-density lipoprotein oxidation without apparent dysregulation of inflammation biomarkers. Increased oxidized low-density lipoproteins are observed in growth restricted twins compared to their co-twins with normal growth at birth.
    European journal of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology 02/2011; 156(1):46-9. · 1.97 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - AMER J OBSTET GYNECOL. 01/2011; 204(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Pre-eclampsia is a leading cause of maternal deaths. These deaths mainly result from eclampsia, uncontrolled hypertension, or systemic inflammation. We developed and validated the fullPIERS model with the aim of identifying the risk of fatal or life-threatening complications in women with pre-eclampsia within 48 h of hospital admission for the disorder. We developed and internally validated the fullPIERS model in a prospective, multicentre study in women who were admitted to tertiary obstetric centres with pre-eclampsia or who developed pre-eclampsia after admission. The outcome of interest was maternal mortality or other serious complications of pre-eclampsia. Routinely reported and informative variables were included in a stepwise backward elimination regression model to predict the adverse maternal outcome. We assessed performance using the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Standard bootstrapping techniques were used to assess potential overfitting. 261 of 2023 women with pre-eclampsia had adverse outcomes at any time after hospital admission (106 [5%] within 48 h of admission). Predictors of adverse maternal outcome included gestational age, chest pain or dyspnoea, oxygen saturation, platelet count, and creatinine and aspartate transaminase concentrations. The fullPIERS model predicted adverse maternal outcomes within 48 h of study eligibility (AUC ROC 0·88, 95% CI 0·84-0·92). There was no significant overfitting. fullPIERS performed well (AUC ROC >0·7) up to 7 days after eligibility. The fullPIERS model identifies women at increased risk of adverse outcomes up to 7 days before complications arise and can thereby modify direct patient care (eg, timing of delivery, place of care), improve the design of clinical trials, and inform biomedical investigations related to pre-eclampsia. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction; Preeclampsia Foundation; International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research; and Child and Family Research Institute.
    The Lancet 01/2011; 377(9761):219-27. · 39.06 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - AMER J OBSTET GYNECOL. 01/2011; 204(1).
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    ABSTRACT: We hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and soluble TNF-α receptor 2 (sTNF-R2) co-play a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Correlation of H(2)O(2) and sTNF-R2 was assessed in vivo in maternal blood and placenta, and in vitro in cytotrophoblasts culture. We showed a positive correlation between increased levels of H(2)O(2) and sTNF-R2 early at 10-15 gestational weeks and at term in maternal serum, and in placenta of women with preeclampsia. Our in vitro experiments showed that H(2)O(2) induced the placental synthesis of sTNF-R2. We propose to consider H(2)O(2) and sTNF-R2 as potential biomarkers in predicting preeclampsia.
    Hypertension in Pregnancy 12/2010; 31(3):357-66. · 0.93 Impact Factor
  • Diabetes care 11/2010; 33(11):e145; author reply e146. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectiveTo review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients.OutcomesOutcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality.EvidenceLiterature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.ValuesThe evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.Benefits, Harms, and CostsImplementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible.
    International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. 08/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: To review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients. Outcomes: Outcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Literature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 08/2010; 110(2):167-73. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review the principles of prenatal diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and to describe the outcomes of the affected pregnancies. Effective management of fetal infection following primary and secondary maternal CMV infection during pregnancy. Neonatal signs include intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), microcephaly, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, jaundice, chorioretinitis, thrombocytopenia and anemia, and long-term sequelae consist of sensorineural hearing loss, mental retardation, delay of psychomotor development, and visual impairment. These guidelines provide a framework for diagnosis and management of suspected CMV infections. Medline was searched for articles published in English from 1966 to 2009, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (congenital CMV infection) and key words (intrauterine growth restriction, microcephaly). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. RECOMMENDATIONS The quality of evidence reported in this document has been assessed using the evaluation of evidence criteria in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). 1. Diagnosis of primary maternal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in pregnancy should be based on de-novo appearance of virus-specific IgG in the serum of a pregnant woman who was previously seronegative, or on detection of specific IgM antibody associated with low IgG avidity. (II-2A) 2. In case of primary maternal infection, parents should be informed about a 30% to 40% risk for intrauterine transmission and fetal infection, and a risk of 20% to 25% for development of sequelae postnatally if the fetus is infected. (II-2A) 3. The prenatal diagnosis of fetal CMV infection should be based on amniocentesis, which should be done at least 7 weeks after presumed time of maternal infection and after 21 weeks of gestation. This interval is important because it takes 5 to 7 weeks following fetal infection and subsequent replication of the virus in the kidney for a detectable quantity of the virus to be secreted to the amniotic fluid. (II-2A) 4. The diagnosis of secondary infection should be based on a significant rise of IgG antibody titre with or without the presence of IgM and high IgG avidity. In cases of proven secondary infection, amniocentesis may be considered, but the risk-benefit ratio is different because of the low transmission rate. (III-C) 5. Following a diagnosis of fetal CMV infection, serial ultrasound examinations should be performed every 2 to 4 weeks to detect sonographic abnormalities, which may aid in determining the prognosis of the fetus, although it is important to be aware that the absence of sonographic findings does not guarantee a normal outcome. (II-2B) 6. Quantitative determination of CMV DNA in the amniotic fluid may assist in predicting the fetal outcome. (II-3B) 7. Routine screening of pregnant women for CMV by serology testing is currently not recommended. (III-B) 8. Serologic testing for CMV may be considered for women who develop influenza-like illness during pregnancy or following detection of sonographic findings suggestive of CMV infection. (III-B) 9. Seronegative health care and child care workers may be offered serologic monitoring during pregnancy. Monitoring may also be considered for seronegative pregnant women who have a young child in day care. (III-B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 04/2010; 32(4):348-54.
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    ABSTRACT: To review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients. Outcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Literature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible. 1. Periodic health examinations and other appointments for gynaecologic care prior to pregnancy offer ideal opportunities to raise the issue of weight loss before conception. Women should be encouraged to enter pregnancy with a BMI < 30 kg/m(2), and ideally < 25 kg/m(2). (III-B). 2. BMI should be calculated from pre-pregnancy height and weight. Those with a pre-pregnancy BMI > 30 kg/m(2) are considered obese. This information can be helpful in counselling women about pregnancy risks associated with obesity. (II-2B). 3. Obese pregnant women should receive counselling about weight gain, nutrition, and food choices. (II-2B). 4. Obese women should be advised that they are at risk for medical complications such as cardiac disease, pulmonary disease, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, and obstructive sleep apnea. Regular exercise during pregnancy may help to reduce some of these risks. (II-2B). 5. Obese women should be advised that their fetus is at an increased risk of congenital abnormalities, and appropriate screening should be done. (II-2B). 6. Obstetric care providers should take BMI into consideration when arranging for fetal anatomic assessment in the second trimester. Anatomic assessment at 20 to 22 weeks may be a better choice for the obese pregnant patient. (II-2B). 7. Obese pregnant women have an increased risk of Caesarean section, and the success of vaginal birth after Caesarean section is decreased. (II-2B). 8. Antenatal consultation with an anaesthesiologist should be considered to review analgesic options and to ensure a plan is in place should a regional anaesthetic be chosen. (III-B). 9. The risk of venous thromboembolism for each obese woman should be evaluated. In some clinical situations, consideration for thromboprophylaxis should be individualized. (III-B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 02/2010; 32(2):165-73.
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    ABSTRACT: To assess features of sleep among pregnant women. We conducted a prospective cohort study of low-risk pregnant women in a tertiary perinatal centre (CHUS) in Eastern Townships, Quebec. Sleep was assessed during the second trimester (mean gestational age 16.1 +/- 3.0 weeks) (T2) and third trimester (mean gestational age 27.5 +/- 1.8 weeks) (T3) using a validated self-administered questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Scores in this index range from 0 to 21, representing the cumulative scoring of seven sleep components. Subjects with a score > 5 were identified as "poor sleepers." Descriptive, bivariate, and regression analyses were performed. Among 260 consenting women, 192 (73.6%) had a term delivery without any adverse outcome. There were no differences in sleep parameters between pregnancies with adverse outcome and without adverse outcome. Mean overall PSQI scores showed evidence of deterioration in sleep quality from T2 (5.26 +/- 3.16) to T3 (6.73 +/- 4.02; P < 0.01). This deterioration was displayed in five of seven sleep components (P < 0.01). Scores in the "poor sleeper" range were recorded by 36% of women in T2 and 56%, of women in T3 (P < 0.01). "Poor sleep" in T2 and T3 was associated with low or high weight gain (P < 0.01), annual family income < $40,000 (P = 0.03), and single motherhood (P < 0.01). There was a trend for a seasonal influence on sleep scores (P = 0.08). The only predictor of poor sleep using multivariate analysis was single motherhood (P < 0.01). Sleep is disturbed in early pregnancy and is worse in the third trimester. Interventions to improve sleep should be sought to optimize quality of life for pregnant women.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 01/2010; 32(1):28-34.
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the etiology of vasa previa and the risk factors and associated condition, to identify the various clinical presentations of vasa previa, to describe the ultrasound tools used in its diagnosis, and to describe the management of vasa previa. Reduction of perinatal mortality, short-term neonatal morbidity, long-term infant morbidity, and short-term and long-term maternal morbidity and mortality. Published literature on randomized trials prospective cohort studies, and selected retrospective cohort studies was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., selected epidemiological studies comparing delivery by Caesarean section with vaginal delivery studies comparing outcomes when vasa previa is diagnosed antenatally vs.intrapartum) and key words (e.g. vasa previa). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to October 1, 2008. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies,clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and from national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Diagnostic Imaging Committee and the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Benefits, Harms, and Costs: The benefit expected from this guideline is facilitation of optimal and uniform care for pregnancies complicated by vasa previa. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 01/2010; 108(1):85-9. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review the physiology of breech birth; to discern the risks and benefits of a trial of labour versus planned Caesarean section; and to recommend to obstetricians, family physicians, midwives, obstetrical nurses, anaesthesiologists, pediatricians, and other health care providers selection criteria, intrapartum management parameters, and delivery techniques for a trial of vaginal breech birth. Trial of labour in an appropriate setting or delivery by pre-emptive Caesarean section for women with a singleton breech fetus at term. Reduced perinatal mortality, short-term neonatal morbidity, longterm infant morbidity, and short- and long-term maternal morbidity and mortality. Medline was searched for randomized trials, prospective cohort studies, and selected retrospective cohort studies comparing planned Caesarean section with a planned trial of labour; selected epidemiological studies comparing delivery by Caesarean section with vaginal breech delivery; and studies comparing long-term outcomes in breech infants born vaginally or by Caesarean section. Additional articles were identified through bibliography tracing up to June 1, 2008. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the criteria and classifications of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. This guideline was compared with the 2006 American College of Obstetrician's Committee Opinion on the mode of term singleton breech delivery and with the 2006 Royal College of Obstetrician and Gynaecologists Green Top Guideline: The Management of Breech Presentation. The document was reviewed by Canadian and International clinicians with particular expertise in breech vaginal delivery.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 11/2009; 107(2):169-76. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To review the physiology of breech birth; to discern the risks and benefits of a trial of labour versus planned Caesarean section; and to recommend to obstetricians, family physicians, midwives, obstetrical nurses, anaesthesiologists, pediatricians, and other health care providers selection criteria, intrapartum management parameters, and delivery techniques for a trial of vaginal breech birth.OptionsTrial of labour in an appropriate setting or delivery by pre-emptive Caesarean section for women with a singleton breech fetus at term.OutcomesReduced perinatal mortality, short-term neonatal morbidity, long-term infant morbidity, and short- and long-term maternal morbidity and mortality.EvidenceMedline was searched for randomized trials, prospective cohort studies, and selected retrospective cohort studies comparing planned Caesarean section with a planned trial of labour; selected epidemiological studies comparing delivery by Caesarean section with vaginal breech delivery; and studies comparing long-term outcomes in breech infants born vaginally or by Caesarean section. Additional articles were identified through bibliography tracing up to June 1, 2008.ValuesThe evidence collected was reviewed by the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and quantified using the criteria and classifications of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.ValidationThis guideline was compared with the 2006 American College of Obstetrician's Committee Opinion on the mode of term singleton breech delivery and with the 2006 Royal College of Obstetrician and Gynaecologists Green Top Guideline: The Management of Breech Presentation. The document was reviewed by Canadian and International clinicians with particular expertise in breech vaginal delivery.SponsorsThe Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
    International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. 11/2009; 107(2):169–176.
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    ABSTRACT: Objectif : Analyser les résultats et formuler des recommandations quant à l'utilisation d'antibiotiques en présence d'une rupture prématurée des membranes préterme (RPMP). Issues : Parmi les issues évaluées, on trouvait l'effet de l'antibiothérapie sur l'infection maternelle, la chorioamnionite et la morbidité et la mortalité néonatales. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été identifiée par l'intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou Medline, CINAHL et la Cochrane Library, au moyen d'un vocabulaire contrôlé approprié et de mots clés (PPROM, infection et antibiotics). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction quant à la date ou à la langue n'a été mise en oeuvre. Les recherches ont été régulièrement mises à jour et les données publiées jusqu'en juillet 2008 ont été intégrées à la directive clinique. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l'intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d'organismes s'intéressant à l'évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d'organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d'essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : Les résultats obtenus ont été évalués par le comité sur les maladies infectieuses de la Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada (SOGC), sous la direction des auteurs principaux; les recommandations ont été formulées en fonction des lignes directrices élaborées par le Groupe d'étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs. Avantages, désavantages et coûts : La mise en oeuvre de la présente directive clinique devrait aider les praticiens à élaborer une approche quant au recours à l'antibiothérapie chez les femmes qui présentent une RPMP. Les patientes tireront avantage d'une prise en charge adéquate de cette pathologie. Validation : La présente directive clinique a été analysée et approuvée par le comité sur les maladies infectieuses et le comité de médecine foeto-maternelle, et approuvée par le comité exécutif et le Conseil de la Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Commanditaire : La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Recommandations 1. A la suite d'une RPMP à </= 32 semaines de gestation, des antibiotiques devraient être administrés aux femmes qui ne sont pas en travail afin de prolonger la grossesse et d'atténuer la morbidité maternelle et néonatale. (I-A) 2. Le recours aux antibiotiques devrait être fonction de l'âge gestationnel. Les résultats en soutenant les avantages sont plus concluants en ce qui concerne les âges gestationnels moins avancés (< 32 semaines). (I-A) 3. En ce qui concerne les femmes qui connaissent une RPMP à > 32 semaines de gestation, l'administration d'antibiotiques visant la prolongation de la grossesse est recommandée lorsque la maturité pulmonaire foetale ne peut être prouvée et/ou lorsque l'accouchement n'est pas planifié. (I-A) 4. Les schémas posologiques d'antibiotiques peuvent comprendre une phase parentérale initiale suivie d'une phase orale ou n'être constitués que d'une phase orale. (I-A) 5. Les antibiotiques à privilégier sont les pénicillines ou les antibiotiques macrolides (érythromycine) sous forme parentérale et/ou orale. (I-A) Chez les patientes allergiques à la pénicilline, les antibiotiques macrolides devraient être utilisés seuls. (III-B) 6. Les deux schémas posologiques suivants peuvent être utilisés (ils ont tous deux été utilisés par les plus importants essais comparatifs randomisés s'étant penchés sur la RPMP qui ont indiqué une baisse de la morbidité maternelle et néonatale) : (1) ampicilline, à raison de 2 g IV toutes les 6 heures, et érythromycine, à raison de 250 mg IV toutes les 6 heures, pendant 48 heures, le tout étant suivi d'amoxicilline, à raison de 250 mg par voie orale toutes les 8 heures, et d'érythromycine, à raison de 333 mg par voie orale toutes les 8 heures, pendant 5 jours (I-A); (2) érythromycine, à raison de 250 mg par voie orale toutes les 6 heures, pendant 10 jours (I-A) 7. L'amoxicilline/acide clavulanique ne devrait pas être utilisée en raison du risque accru d'entérocolite nécrosante que courent les nouveau-nés exposés à cet antibiotique. L'amoxicilline utilisée sans acide clavulanique est sûre. (I-A) 8. Les femmes qui connaissent une RPMP devraient faire l'objet d'un dépistage visant les infections des voies urinaires, les infections transmissibles sexuellement et le statut de porteuse de streptocoques du groupe B, et elles devraient être traitées au moyen d'antibiotiques appropriés lorsque ce dépistage donne des résultats positifs. (II-2B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 09/2009; 31(9):868-874.
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To review the evidence and provide recommendations on the use of antibiotics in preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM). Outcomes evaluated include the effect of antibiotic treatment on maternal infection, chorioamnionitis, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library, using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (PPROM, infection, and antibiotics). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and new material incorporated in the guideline to July 2008. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Guideline implementation should assist the practitioner in developing an approach to the use of antibiotics in women with PPROM. Patients will benefit from appropriate management of this condition. This guideline has been reviewed and approved by the Infectious Diseases Committee and the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee of the SOGC, and approved by the Executive and Council of the SOGC. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. 1. Following PPROM at < or = 32 weeks' gestation, antibiotics should be administered to women who are not in labour in order to prolong pregnancy and to decrease maternal and neonatal morbidity. (I-A) 2. The use of antibiotics should be gestational-age dependent. The evidence for benefit is greater at earlier gestational ages (< 32 weeks). (I-A) 3. For women with PPROM at > 32 weeks' gestation, administration of antibiotics to prolong pregnancy is recommended if fetal lung maturity can not be proven and/or delivery is not planned. (I-A) 4. Antibiotic regimens may consist of an initial parenteral phase followed by an oral phase, or may consist of only an oral phase. (I-A) 5. Antibiotics of choice are penicillins or macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin) in parenteral and/or oral forms. (I-A) In patients allergic to penicillin, macrolide antibiotics should be used alone. (III-B) 6. The following two regimens may be used (the two regimens were used in the largest PPROM randomized controlled trials that showed a decrease in both maternal and neonatal morbidity): (1) ampicillin 2 g IV every 6 hours and erythromycin 250 mg IV every 6 hours for 48 hours followed by amoxicillin 250 mg orally every 8 hours and erythromycin 333 mg orally every 8 hours for 5 days (I-A); (2) erythromycin 250 mg orally every 6 hours for 10 days (I-A) 7. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid should not be used because of an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates exposed to this antibiotic. Amoxicillin without clavulanic acid is safe. (I-A) 8. Women presenting with PPROM should be screened for urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted infections, and group B streptococcus carriage, and treated with appropriate antibiotics if positive. (II-2B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 09/2009; 31(9):863-7, 868-74.

Publication Stats

149 Citations
68.19 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2011
    • Université de Sherbrooke
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada
    • Kingston College
      Kingston, New York, United States
  • 2007–2011
    • Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke
      Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada
  • 2009
    • Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada