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Publications (3)3.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is steadily increasing worldwide. According to the Globocan 2008, NHL is ranked as the 12th most common cancer worldwide and the 4th most common cancer in Sudan. Sudan is endemic with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the association between NHL and HBV infection in Sudanese patients, Gezira State. Methods: This was cross sectional case-control study was conducted at the, National Cancer Institute (NCI) University of Gezira, during the period from 2007 to 2008. A total of 81 non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients and 95 hospitals based controlled of matched age and sex, were included in the study. All patients and control had their serum screened for the presence of HBsAg by ELISA and HBV DNA was tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The Statistical Program for Social Science (SPSS16.0) was used for all statistical analyses, and test of significance. Results: The mean age of NHL patients was 37.9±23.6 years with a range (1-85 years). Male to female ratio was 1.9 to 1. There were different types of NHL in this study with the majority being B-cell lymphoma 70.4% (57/81), 49.38% (40/81 ) were positive by PCR,while controls 20/95 (21.05%) with significant difference between cases and controls (P<0.05). There was a significant association between B-cell subtype and HBV by both serological and molecular methods (OR= 6.5 95% CI: 1.3 - 32.5) and (OR= 3.6 95% CI: 0.8 – 07.4). Conclusion: This study concludes that there is a significant association between HBV and the development of NHL in Sudanese patients in Gezira State the finding provides evidence supporting the hypothesis that HBV infection may have an association with the development of NHL patients.
    International Journal of TROPICAL DISEASE & Health. 05/2014; 4(8):860-868.
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are a serious public health problem worldwide and a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The main objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence rate of hepatitis B virus infection among the heath workers in some of Wad Medani Hospitals. This study was conducted during the period from 2009 to 2010. A total of 450 blood samples were collected and screened according to the hospitals and occupation. The mean age of the studied subjects was 33.4 ± 9.5 years with a range of (19 - 60) years. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), the main serologic marker for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection was detected among 4.2% (19/450) of the health care workers using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This study concludes that the prevalence rate of HBsAg among health care workers (HCW) in Wad Medani Hospitals is 4.2%. Vaccination of HBV for the HBsAg negative health care workers is recommended.
    Khartoum Medical Journal. 12/2013; 6(3):941-945.
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    ABSTRACT: Quality-assessed biomedical samples are essential for academia- and industry driven research on human diseases. The etiologies and the molecular genetic factors relevant in African diseases, including both infections and complex degenerative diseases as well as cancer, need to be studied using well annotated and well-preserved biosamples acquired from native African ethnic groups and compare the results with non-African populations and/or with Afro-Americans. However, a number of difficulties negatively impact on the possibility to obtain clinically annotated biological samples in most Sub-Saharan African countries. This is mainly due to major organizational problems, lack of clinical centres that can dedicate resources to research, as well as lack of facilities in which biomaterials can be properly processed and safely stored. Harmonization of biosample acquisition, storage phenotyping schemes and biocomputer infrastructures are the principal objectives of biological resource centers (BRCs). BRCs comprise biobanks of different formats (collection of blood, DNA, tissues, etc., annotated with medical, environmental, life-style and follow up data) a fundamental tool for molecular epidemiological studies aiming to increase excellence and efficacy of biomedical results, drug development and public health. BRCs provide large and highly controlled biomolecular resources necessary to meet the "omics" scientific platforms. Sudan may be a candidate nation to host such infrastructure, in view of its strategic geographical position and the already existing simple biobanking experiences connected with research groups in Central Sudan. Here, we describe the potential role of biobanks in African genetic studies aiming to dissect the eziopathogenesis of complex diseases in relation to environmental and life-style factors.
    Science of The Total Environment 02/2011; 423:210-3. · 3.26 Impact Factor