L Dal Cortivo

Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (40)158.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This report describes the specific kinetics of the peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cell concentration in a selected group of very poor stem cell mobilizer patients treated with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor and determines the kinetics' impact on apheresis. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: All patients had previously experienced at least two failures of mobilization (without use of plerixafor). The present salvage therapy consisted in the administration of 10 µg/kg/day G-CSF for 5 days added to a dose of plerixafor administered at between 5 a.m. and 6 a.m. on Day 5. The PB CD34+ cell counts were tested every 3 hours thereafter. Apheresis was initiated as soon as the PB CD34+ cell count reached 10 × 10(6) /L. RESULTS: A PB CD34+ cell count higher than 10 × 10(6) /L was observed as soon as 3 hours after plerixafor administration in 10 of the 11 patients who reached this threshold at some point in the monitoring process. Interestingly, all patients presented an early decrease in the PB CD34+ cell count 8 to 12 hours after plerixafor administration (below 10 × 10(6) /L for seven patients). CONCLUSION: Had such patients been tested for PB CD34+ cell mobilization according to conventional criteria (i.e., 11 hr after plerixafor administration), apheresis would not have been performed at the optimal timing. For very poor stem cell mobilizer patients, early monitoring of PB CD34+ cell count may be required for the optimal initiation of apheresis.
    Transfusion 06/2012; · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) have been proposed for autologous angiogenic therapy. The objectives of this study were to quantify EPC in the peripheral blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) of patients with critical limb ischemia that had received BM-MNC as a cell therapy product, and to study the putative relationship between the presence of EPC and the process of neovascularization in toe or transmetatarsal amputation specimens. Early and late endothelial progenitor cells (CFU-EC and ECFC) were cultivated and quantified according to published methods in peripheral blood and BM-MNC from patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI; n = 11) enrolled in the OPTIPEC trial ( http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00377897 ) to receive BM-MNC as a cell therapy product. Eight out of the 11 patients had undergone amputations. Three of the patients displayed a neoangiogenic process that was associated with a higher number of CFU-EC in BM-MNC, while CD3+ , CFU-GM and CD34+ in BM-MNC, and EPC in peripheral blood, did not correlate with the appearance of newly formed vessels. As expected, circulating CFU-EC and ECFC counts were significantly lower in CLI patients compared with age-matched controls. In patients with critical limb ischemia, EPC in peripheral blood were decreased compared with healthy individuals. However, in BM-MNC we found that relative numbers of CFU-EC could be used as an indicator to discriminate patients with neoangiogenic processes. These results need to be confirmed in a randomized study.
    Cytotherapy 02/2012; 14(2):232-9. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    Bone marrow transplantation 10/2011; 47(7):997-1000. · 3.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mobilization techniques for autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection include chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic growth factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Biosimilar versions of G-CSF are now available in Europe. In this study, 40 patients with a hematological malignancy scheduled to receive biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio(®) Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals, Paris, France) following first-cycle chemotherapy for treatment and autologous PBSC mobilization were prospectively included at a single center. These patients were compared with a historical control group who had been treated with G-CSF (Neupogen(®) Paris, France) at the same center according to the same clinical protocol. PBSC harvesting was considered successful if at least 3×10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were collected. If three consecutive CD34+ tests were below 10/μL then PBSC harvesting was not performed. Patient characteristics were similar in both groups with no significant differences in age, diagnosis, previous chemotherapy, or chemotherapy mobilization regimen. No significant differences were observed between groups in median CD34+ cells mobilized and collected, or the number of G-CSF injections and leukaphereses required to obtain the minimal CD34+ cell count. Proportion of failures was also similar in both groups. Zarziois(®) comparable to Neupogen(®) for PBSC mobilization and collection after chemotherapy and so may provide a more cost-effective strategy.
    Advances in Therapy 03/2011; 28(4):304-10. · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although partially HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an important therapeutic option for children with primary immunodeficiencies, delayed reconstitution of the T-cell compartment remains a major clinical concern. Adoptive immunotherapies to provide recipients with a protective and diverse T-cell repertoire in the months following HSCT are warranted. In order to improve T-cell reconstitution after T-cell-depleted HSCT, different strategies are currently being studied. Some are based on administration of modified mature T cells (e.g., allodepleted T cells or pathogen-specific T cells). Others aim at accelerating de novo thymopoiesis from donor-derived hematopoietic stem cells in vivo via the administration of thymopoietic agents or the transfer of large numbers of T-cell precursors generated ex vivo. The present article will provide a brief summary of recent advances in the field of allodepletion and adoptive transfer of pathogen-specific T cells and a detailed discussion of strategies for enhancing thymopoiesis in vivo.
    Immunotherapy 07/2010; 2(4):481-96. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Improvement of immune reconstitution after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a key issue determining the clinical outcome of this widely used therapeutic approach. To this end, new strategies have been prompted by recent discoveries in immunology. In the setting of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) geno(pheno)identical HSCT, better prevention and treatment of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) could significantly attenuate the thymic epithelium damage responsible for delayed and incomplete T-cell reconstitution. In a haploidentical setting, methods that would significantly accelerate neothymopoiesis in the months following injection of highly purified CD34+ cells are warranted. If these objectives could be achieved, the haploidentical procedure would become more readily available to patients affected by acquired or inherited disorders of the haematopoietic system.
    Current opinion in immunology 09/2009; 21(5):544-8. · 10.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative treatment for Griscelli syndrome type 2, an inherited immune disorder causing fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Optimal therapeutic modalities are not yet well known. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome for 10 patients who underwent HSCT in a single center between 1996 and 2008. Seven patients (70%) were cured of the primary immune defect (mean follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 0.8-12.0 years), 4 of them without neurologic sequelae. In the 3 deceased patients, death occurred within 110 days of HSCT and was probably due to adverse reaction to HSCT in 2 patients and to HLH relapse in one patient. One patient received 2 transplants because of graft failure. Clinical events included veno-occlusive disease (n = 5), acute (n = 7) or chronic (n = 1) graft-versus-host disease II-III, and Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferative disease (n = 2). Of the 7 patients with neurologic involvement before HSCT, 4 survived and 2 presented sequelae. Furthermore, 1 patient lacking neurologic involvement before HSCT developed long-term sequelae. These results demonstrate the efficacy of HSCT in curing the immune disorder but also show that neurologic HLH before HSCT is a major factor, given the neurologic sequelae after otherwise successful HSCT. Additional studies are required to improve treatment.
    Blood 05/2009; 114(1):211-8. · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Detailed assessment of the long-term outcome of HSCT, ie, the occurrence of clinical events and the quality and stability of immune reconstitution, is now required. We performed a single-center retrospective analysis of the long-term outcome of HSCT in 90-patient cohort followed for between 2 and 34 years (median, 14 years). Clinical events and immune reconstitution data were collected. Almost half the patients have experienced one or more significant clinical events, including persistent chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), autoimmune and inflammatory manifestations, opportunistic and nonopportunistic infections, chronic human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, and a requirement for nutritional support. With the notable exception of severe HPV infection, these complications tend to become less common 15 years later after HSCT. A multivariate analysis showed that the occurrence of these events correlated with non-genoidentical donors, diagnosis of Artemis SCID, and quality of immune reconstitution. In most cases, HSCT enables long-term survival with infrequent sequelae. However, the occurrence of relatively late-onset complications is a concern that requires specific means of prevention and justifies careful patient follow-up.
    Blood 02/2009; 113(17):4114-24. · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The delayed reconstitution of the T-lymphoid compartment represents a major clinical challenge after HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The generation of new T lymphocytes deriving from transplanted hematopoietic stem cells requires several months, a period associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections and relapses. Recently, the early steps of human lymphopoiesis and the nature of the thymus-seeding progenitors were described. Moreover several scientific groups succeeded to generate T-cell precursors from murine and human hematopoietic stem cells in vitro by transitory exposition to Notch-ligands. Here we summarize and discuss these results and their possible usage in the development of new cell therapies to shorten the immunodeficient period following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
    Immunologic Research 12/2008; 44(1-3):54-60. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previously, several individuals with X-linked SCID (SCID-X1) were treated by gene therapy to restore the missing IL-2 receptor gamma (IL2RG) gene to CD34+ BM precursor cells using gammaretroviral vectors. While 9 of 10 patients were successfully treated, 4 of the 9 developed T cell leukemia 31-68 months after gene therapy. In 2 of these cases, blast cells contained activating vector insertions near the LIM domain-only 2 (LMO2) proto-oncogene. Here, we report data on the 2 most recent adverse events, which occurred in patients 7 and 10. In patient 10, blast cells contained an integrated vector near LMO2 and a second integrated vector near the proto-oncogene BMI1. In patient 7, blast cells contained an integrated vector near a third proto-oncogene,CCND2. Additional genetic abnormalities in the patients' blast cells included chromosomal translocations, gain-of-function mutations activating NOTCH1, and copy number changes, including deletion of tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A, 6q interstitial losses, and SIL-TAL1 rearrangement. These findings functionally specify a genetic network that controls growth in T cell progenitors. Chemotherapy led to sustained remission in 3 of the 4 cases of T cell leukemia, but failed in the fourth. Successful chemotherapy was associated with restoration of polyclonal transduced T cell populations. As a result, the treated patients continued to benefit from therapeutic gene transfer.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 10/2008; · 12.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immunopathology of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) involves secretion of proinflammatory cytokines with subsequent expression of danger signals by injured host tissues. This explanation, however, does not explain the cluster of aGVHD target organs (skin, gut, and liver). NKG2D ligands (MICA/B and ULBP1-3 proteins) are stress-induced molecules that act as danger signals to alert NK and alphabeta or gammadelta CD8 T cells through engagement of the activating NKG2D receptor. We observed a strong and reversible induction of MICA/B expression in skin and liver sections during aGVHD. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and gamma-radiation up-regulated expression of MICA/B and ULBP proteins in vitro on skin and intestine epithelial cell lines and ex vivo in normal skin explants. This NKG2D-ligand induction was regulated by a complex interplay between NFkB and JNK activation pathways. Our data suggest that NKG2D ligand induction might participate in the amplification loop that leads to tissue damage during aGVHD.
    Transplantation 04/2008; 85(6):911-5. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Identification of a thymus-seeding progenitor originating from human bone marrow (BM) constitutes a key milestone in understanding the mechanisms of T cell development and provides new potential for correcting T cell deficiencies. We report the characterization of a novel lymphoid-restricted subset, which is part of the lineage-negative CD34(+)CD10(+) progenitor population and which is distinct from B cell-committed precursors (in view of the absence of CD24 expression). We demonstrate that these Lin(-)CD34(+)CD10(+)CD24(-) progenitors have a very low myeloid potential but can generate B, T, and natural killer lymphocytes and coexpress recombination activating gene 1, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase, PAX5, interleukin 7 receptor alpha, and CD3epsilon. These progenitors are present in the cord blood and in the BM but can also be found in the blood throughout life. Moreover, they belong to the most immature thymocyte population. Collectively, these findings unravel the existence of a postnatal lymphoid-polarized population that is capable of migrating from the BM to the thymus.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 01/2008; 204(13):3085-93. · 13.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quantification of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells is commonly used to plan peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) collection but is time-consuming. Sysmex has developed a hematology analyzer that can quickly identify a population of immature hematopoietic cells (HPCs) according to cell size, cell density, and differential lysis resistance, which may indicate the presence of PBPCs in PB. This prospective study has evaluated the potential of such method to predict the PBPC mobilization. A total of 141 patients underwent PBPC mobilization. PB HPCs and PB CD34+ cells were simultaneously quantified with a hematology analyzer (SE2100, Sysmex) and flow cytometry, respectively. The number of blood volumes processed was then based on PB CD34+ cell concentration. The optimal PB HPC level able to predict a minimal level of 10 x 10(6) PB CD34+ cells per L was 5 x 10(6) per L with positive and negative predictive values of 0.93 and 0.36 percent, respectively. For this cutoff point, sensitivity and specificity were 0.81 and 0.65, respectively. The median number of blood volumes processed according to the PB CD34+ cell count allowed us to perform only one apheresis procedure for a majority of patients. PB HPC quantification is very useful to quickly determine the initiation of PBPC apheresis especially for patients with higher concentrations. For patients exhibiting a lower HPC count (<5 x 10(6)/L), other parameters such as a CD34 test may be needed. Such a policy associated with a length of apheresis adapted to the richness in the PB CD34+ cells allows for optimizing the organization of centers with an improvement in patient comfort and economical savings.
    Transfusion 10/2007; 47(10):1851-7. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Successful peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection depends on the timing of apheresis based on CD34+ cell enumeration. Because this analysis is expensive and induces organization difficulties, we evaluated hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) quantification on the Sysmex XE-2100 as a surrogate analysis. We tested 157 blood samples for CD34+ cells and HPC counts. We found a good linear correlation between HPC and CD34+ and determined simple rules allowing to use HPC count in daily practice. We set a positive cut-off >30 HPC/mm(3) for allowing PBSC harvest and a negative cut-off at 0 HPC/mm(3) for which collection should be delayed. These two situations accounted for 62% of cases and CD34+ cell count by flow cytometry confirmed HPC result in 95% of cases. Between 0 and 30 HPC/mm3, CD34+ enumeration is required for decision-making. We conclude that HPC count may be a useful surrogate for CD34+ enumeration in PBSC harvest monitoring.
    Leukemia and Lymphoma 01/2007; 48(1):89-96. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to define the minimal effective dose (MED) of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) among five daily doses following chemotherapy for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection. Twenty-five patients were included in this double-blind dose-finding phase II study conducted according to a two-stage Bayesian design. The estimated probabilities of success for PBSC collection for the G-CSF doses of 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 microg/m2/day were 84%, 87.7%, 91%, 93.9 and 96.4%, respectively. Low G-CSF doses may be used with a similar probability of success as conventional doses and could allow significant savings.
    Haematologica 05/2006; 91(4):550-3. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A study was conducted to compare the efficiency and toxicity of two peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization procedures for newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma. Patients from group 1 (n=51) were treated by high-dose cyclophosphamide (HD-CY) plus G-CSF (5 microg/kg/day), and the second group (n=31) by VAD regimen plus G-CSF administration (10 microg/kg/day). Successful mobilization, defined by a minimal count of 2.5 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg collected, was achieved in 96 and 90% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (P=0.15). The mean peripheral blood CD34(+) cells concentration and the mean CD34(+) cells/kg collected were higher in group 2 than in the group 1 (P=0.05). The mean number of leukaphereses necessary to collect a count of 2.5 x 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg was reduced in group 2 compared to group 1. Adverse events, blood products consumption and time spent in the hospital were significantly greater after HD-CY. In conclusion, VAD plus a G-CSF dose of 10 microg/kg administration seems preferential to HD-CY plus a G-CSF dose of 5 microg/kg for PBSC collection because of equivalent or better efficiency in stem cell mobilization, strong favorable toxicity profile and reduced cost.
    Bone Marrow Transplantation 05/2006; 37(8):725-9. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the treatment of choice for many hematologic malignancies and inherited disorders of the hematopoietic system. Ex vivo T-cell depletion (TCD) of the graft and post-transplantation immunosuppression efficiently prevents the development of GvHD in no- MHC-identical settings. However, the consequence of these non-specific strategies is a long-lasting immunodeficiency associated with increased incidence of disease relapse, graft rejection and reactivation of viral infections. Donor lymphocyte infusion, which is used for treating leukemic relapse after allogeneic HSCT, can result in severe GvHD. Several strategies are being optimized specifically to inactivate anti-host T cells while preserving anti-leukemic or anti-microbial immunocompetence. Based on the ex vivo or in vivo elimination of anti-host T cells, or on the modulation of their anti-host activity, these approaches, which have been explored extensively in pre-clinical studies and tested in some preliminary clinical trials, are discussed in this paper.
    Cytotherapy 02/2005; 7(2):102-8. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hematological inherited diseases can be cured by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor (MSD), but the outcome of unrelated donors (URD) or haploidentical donors (HMD) has been a cause of concern. In all, 94 children affected with inherited diseases underwent HSCT at a single center using MSD (group A, n=31), URD (group B, n=23) or HMD (group C, n=40). There was no difference in the rate of engraftment or in the incidence of grades III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) between the groups. Survival rate was 80.6% in group A, 62.5% in group B and 47.5% in group C (P=0.023). In group B, survival rate was 73.7% in the subgroup with zero or one class I mismatch, and 25% in the subgroup with two or more class I mismatches (P=0.04). In group C, survival rate was 83.3% in the 9/10-identical subgroup, 64.3% in the seven or 8/10 subgroup, and 25% in the five or 6/10 subgroup (P=0.0007). Thus, engraftment, incidence of GVHD and survival are similar in recipients of grafts from MSD, URD with 0-1 class I-mismatch, or HMD with at least 7/10 HLA matches. The low success of HSCT using more disparate donors suggests reserving them for patients with very poor prognosis.
    Bone Marrow Transplantation 07/2004; 33(11):1089-95. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The limitations of antiviral drugs and a better understanding of the cellular immune response to CMV has lead to the development of alternative therapies that restore host cellular immunity to CMV. Infusion of donor T lymphocytes results in variable protection against CMV but a high incidence of graft-versus-host disease in the allogeneic setting. To prevent this complication and further improve anti-CMV immune response, several groups have developed new approaches, such as the introduction of a suicide gene to control alloreactivity against the host or the selective activation of CMV-specific T cells by antigen-presenting cells expressing CMV antigens introduced by gene transfer. Depending on the target cells and the strategy chosen, adenovirus, retrovirus or poxviruses derived vectors are used for gene transfer. The protocols as well as the preclinical and clinical results obtained in the field of anti-CMV immunotherapy using gene transfer are reported and discussed.
    Human Immunology 06/2004; 65(5):565-70. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although CD34 cell dose is known to influence outcome of peripheral stem cell- and/or T-cell-depleted transplantation, such data on unmanipulated marrow transplantation are scarce. To study the influence of CD34(+) cell dose on hematopoietic reconstitution and incidence of infections after bone marrow transplantation, we retrospectively analyzed 212 patients from January 1994 to August 1999 who received a transplant of an unmanipulated graft from an HLA-identical sibling donor. Median age was 31 years; 176 patients had hematologic malignancies. Acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted mainly in cyclosporin associated with methotrexate (n = 174). Median number of bone marrow nucleated cells and CD34(+) cells infused were 2.4 x 10(8)/kg and 3.7 x 10(6)/kg, respectively. A CD34(+) cell dose of 3 x 10(6)/kg or more significantly influenced neutrophil (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, P =.04), monocyte (HR = 1.47, P =.02), lymphocyte (HR = 1.70, P =.003), erythrocyte (HR = 1.77, P =.0002), and platelet (HR = 1.98, P =.00008) recoveries. CD34(+) cell dose also influenced the incidence of secondary neutropenia (HR = 0.60, P =.05). Bacterial and viral infections were not influenced by CD34 cell dose, whereas it influenced the incidence of fungal infections (HR = 0.41, P =.008). Estimated 180-day transplantation-related mortality (TRM) and 5-year survival were 25% and 56%, respectively, and both were highly affected by CD34(+) cell dose (HR = 0.55, P =.006 and HR = 0.54, P =.03, respectively). Five-year survival and 180-day TRM were, respectively, 64% and 19% for patients receiving a CD34(+) cell dose of 3 x 10(6)/kg or more and 40% and 37% for the remainders. In conclusion a CD34(+) cell dose of 3 x 10(6)/kg or more improved all hematopoietic recoveries, decreased the incidence of fungal infections and TRM, and improved overall survival.
    Blood 05/2002; 99(8):2726-33. · 9.78 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

983 Citations
158.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2011
    • Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2010
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2008–2009
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2004
    • Hôpital Universitaire Necker
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2000
    • Mercy Hospital St. Louis
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 1996
    • Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire
      Strasburg, Alsace, France
    • Institut National de la Transfusion Sanguine, Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France