Anna Måsbäck

Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Skåne, Sweden

Are you Anna Måsbäck?

Claim your profile

Publications (45)146.32 Total impact

  • Br J Dermatology. 01/2009;
  • Source
    E. Epstein, J. Persson, A. Måsbäck
    Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology 08/2008; 32(3):329-330. · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract
    01/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of fertility-sparing treatment in ovarian borderline tumors and early invasive ovarian cancer. All women diagnosed with an ovarian borderline tumor or early invasive ovarian cancer who were treated with fertility-sparing surgery at the University Hospital in Lund between 1988 and 2002 were identified and included in the study (n=23). During the follow-up period of a median 92 months, range 11-185 months, no relapse was found in the patients with Stage 1a tumors, including both borderline tumors (n=12) and invasive well-differentiated (n=9) and moderately differentiated (n=1) ovarian cancers. One patient with poorly differentiated ovarian cancer Stage 1c was 13 weeks' pregnant at the time of the primary operation. Although, unilateral oophorectomy was performed she insisted on continuing the pregnancy. At 37 weeks she had a cesarean section and the ovarian cancer was disseminated. Chemotherapy was given but she died less than a year later. None of the other patients received chemotherapy. In total, 30 children were born to 15 patients. Prophylactic removal of the remaining ovary+/-hysterectomy was accepted in only in six of the women after fulfilling their desire to have more children. Young women with Stage 1a epithelial ovarian cancer and borderline tumors do not have to give up their fertility in order to receive successful and safe treatment of their disease. However, several of these patients do not accept the recommendation of prophylactic oophorectomy of the contralateral ovary and hysterectomy after completion of childbearing.
    European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 10/2007; 134(1):110-4. · 1.63 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: At least one of ten patients with ovarian cancer is estimated to develop their tumor because of heredity with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) being the major genetic causes. Cancer at young age is a hallmark of heredity, and ovarian cancers associated with HNPCC have been demonstrated to develop at a particularly early age. We used the Swedish Cancer Registry to identify a population-based series of 98 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers that developed before 40 years. Mucinous and endometrioid cancers were overrepresented and were diagnosed in 27% and 16% of the tumors, respectively. Immunostaining using antibodies against MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 was used to assess the mismatch-repair status and revealed loss of expression of MLH1/PMS2 in two cases, loss of MSH2/MSH6 in one case, and loss of MSH6 only in three tumors. A microsatellite instability-high phenotype was verified in five of six tumors. Based on the identified mutations and family history of cancer, several of these individuals are likely to be affected by HNPCC. We conclude that although the causes of the vast majority of epithelial ovarian cancer at young age are unknown, HNPCC should be considered because of the high risk of metachronous colorectal cancer in the individual and the possibility of preventing additional cancers in the family through control programs.
    International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 07/2007; 17(4):789-93. · 1.95 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The hypotheses that Swedish patients with four or more primary tumours [including at least one cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM)] harbour an increased number of CDKN2A (formerly p16) germline mutations, and that this group of patients show a predisposition to other tumours, e.g. nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), were studied descriptively. So far the mutation 113insArg explains all CDKN2A-associated CMM in ethnic Swedes. All patients with four or more primary tumours, of which at least one was a CMM, from the Southern Swedish Regional Tumour Registry, between 1958 and 1999, were included in this study. Forty-four patients were found and subdivided into three groups according to having multiple CMM (group A) or single CMM +/- NMSC (groups B and C). Screening for the presence of the Swedish founder mutation 113insArg in blood or in tissue blocks was performed. Patients in group A were younger at the time of the first CMM diagnosis than patients in group B and group C. The 113insArg mutation was found in four of 44 patients (9%), three with multiple CMM. In group C (n = 14) no founder mutation was evident, while in group B (n = 15) one mutation carrier was found. Nonmutation carriers with multiple CMM (group A) also had a predilection for meningiomas and neurinomas (four patients) or multiple NMSC (three patients). In group B CMM were especially associated with adenocarcinomas but in group C CMM were associated with multiple NMSC. The association between meningiomas and neurinomas (no acoustic neurinoma was seen) might indicate a new syndrome. Patients in groups B and C may harbour unknown genetic defects, which could interact with different environmental risk factors.
    British Journal of Dermatology 04/2004; 150(3):531-6. · 4.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: At least 10% of all ovarian cancers are estimated to have a hereditary background. Hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC) due to mutations in the BRCA genes is a major cause of hereditary ovarian cancer, although its frequency and relationship to age and family history in unselected series of ovarian cancers is not completely known. We report here the results of a full mutational screening analysis for germ line BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in 161 patients with invasive epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Age at diagnosis ranged from 22 to 82 years (mean 59 years). Deleterious (frame-shift, nonsense and missense) mutations were detected in 13/161 (8%) of the patients and affected BRCA1 in 12 cases and BRCA2 in one case. Four additional missense variants (one in BRCA1 and three in BRCA2) with a possible association with an increased risk ovarian cancer were revealed, resulting in a total frequency of BRCA gene alterations of 17/161 (11%). The 13 patients with deleterious mutations had a mean age of 57 years (range 41-76 years) and only three of these patients were below 50 years of age. A family history of at least one breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer was reported in all but 1 of the patients with BRCA mutations compared with only 24% of patients without mutations. Our findings in this prospective study confirm approximately 1 in 10 patients with ovarian cancer carry a germ line BRCA gene mutation associated with HBOC, and also indicate that a large number of these patients are over 50 years of age at diagnosis.
    European Journal of Cancer 03/2004; 40(3):422-8. · 4.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary cutaneous malignant melanomas (CMMs) from 26 individuals belonging to nine families with an identified mutation were clinically and histopathologically compared with 78 matched CMM controls and with a population-based series of CMMs ( = 667). All tumours were histopathologically re-examined. CDKN2A-associated cases were significantly less invasive compared with the matched controls, with an adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) of 2.9 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.0-8.1 ( = 0.04). According to the odds ratio (OR) values, CDKN2A-associated cases seemed to have tumours more often located on the head and neck (adjOR 2.9, 95% CI 0.6-13.7), with less inflammation (adjOR 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.8) and regression (adjOR 0.6, 95% CI 0.2-1.8) but more frequent histological ulceration (adjOR 1.9, 95% CI 0.6-5.8). In comparison with the population-based material, CDKN2A-associated cases were significantly younger at diagnosis (crude OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6-7.5, divided at 50 years) and had less regressive reaction in their tumours (crude OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.2-0.8). No significant differences were seen for tumour thickness between the different groups. On multivariate analysis, the overall survival was significantly worse for thicker tumours and older age ( = 0.04 for both). To our knowledge this is the first description of the histopathological features of CMMs from families with mutations in the CDKN2A gene.
    Melanoma Research 01/2003; 12(6):549-57. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A population-based study from Sweden identified 711 patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma diagnosed in 1965, 1975, 1985 and 1989. Prognostic factors were evaluated and a review of the literature was performed. On univariate analysis, thick tumours (> 0.8 mm) (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-2.1), increasing Clark level (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.6-2.0), ulceration (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.6-2.0), nodular melanoma (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3-1.6) and increasing age (continuous variable, P < 0.0001) were associated with a shorter survival. Location on extremities (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-0.9), inflammation (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-0.9) and female gender (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.8-0.9) were associated with improved survival. On multivariate analysis, thick tumours (> 0.8 mm) (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.7) and ulceration (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.2-1.6) were independently related to a poor prognosis, while location on extremities (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-0.9), inflammation (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.7-0.9) and female gender (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.8-1.0) were associated with improved survival. No difference in mean tumour thickness was seen over time, but there was a significant increase in the percentage of thin melanomas (< 0.8 mm) in 1985 (P = 0.01) and 1989 (P = 0.002) compared with 1965. The incidence of melanomas with inflammation increased significantly (P = 0.04), as did age at diagnosis (P = 0.005).
    Melanoma Research 10/2001; 11(5):435-45. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The plasminogen activating system is involved in tumor growth and metastasis by degradation of extracellular matrix, and modulation of cell adhesion and migration. Benign and well-differentiated malignant ovarian tumors present as cystic lesions with preserved glandular morphology, whereas poorly differentiated tumors and metastases are solid with characteristic absence of glandular morphology. We analyzed the mRNAs for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR), and inhibitor (PAI-1) in serous ovarian tumors by in situ hybridization and by densitometric scanning of Northern blots prepared from tissue extracts. The mRNA expressing cells in the in situ hybridization sections were evaluated and counted by two different observers. The number of mRNA expressing cells for uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 were all significantly increased in solid as compared with cystic malignant tumors. The increased expression of all three mRNA species was mainly located in the stroma of poorly differentiated tumors and metastases. Apart from being expressed in the stroma of these tumors, uPAR mRNA was also expressed by tumor cells located along the stromal/epithelial boarder. In addition, the tumor tissue content of uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 mRNAs as measured by Northern blots were higher in the solid as compared with the cystic tumors. Increased expression of uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 genes in the solid tumors suggest a correlation with a more aggressive phenotype.
    International Journal of Cancer 06/2001; 92(4):497-502. · 5.01 Impact Factor
  • Source
    J Westerdahl, C Ingvar, A Mâsbäck, H Olsson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In a new population-based, matched, case-control study from southern Sweden of 571 patients with a first diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma, between 1995 and 1997, and 913 healthy controls aged 16 to 80 years, the association between sunscreen use and malignant melanoma was evaluated. The median sun protection factor (SPF) used by both cases and controls was 6, range 2 to 25. Sunscreen users reported greater sun exposure than non-users. Persons who used sunscreens did not have a decreased risk of malignant melanoma. Instead, a significantly elevated odds ratio (OR) for developing malignant melanoma after regular sunscreen use was found, adjusted for history of sunburns, hair color, frequency of sunbathing during the summer, and duration of each sunbathing occasion ¿OR = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.9]. The OR was higher in subjects who reported that sunscreen use enabled them to spend more time sunbathing (adjusted OR = 8.7, 95% CI 1.0-75.8 for always vs. never use). The association appeared to hold for subjects who did not suffer from sunburns while using sunscreens, for subjects who used SPF of 10 or lower, and among men. The pattern of a significantly increased melanoma risk was seen only for lesions of the trunk. Our results are probably related mainly to earlier sunscreens of low SPF. They substantiate the hypothesis that sunscreen use, by permitting more time sunbathing, is associated with melanoma occurrence.
    International Journal of Cancer 08/2000; 87(1):145-50. · 5.01 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Inherited mutations in the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene, which encodes the p16INK4a protein, and in the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) gene confer susceptibility to cutaneous malignant melanoma. We analyzed families with two or more cases of melanoma for germline mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4 to elucidate the contribution of these gene defects to familial malignant melanoma and to the occurrence of other cancer types. Methods: The entire CDKN2A coding region and exon 2 of the CDK4 gene of an affected member of each of 52 families from southern Sweden with at least two cases of melanoma in first- or second-degree relatives were screened for mutations by use of polymerase chain reaction–single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results: CDKN2A mutations were found in 10 (19%) of the 52 families. Nine families carried an identical alteration consisting of the insertion of arginine at position 113 of p16INK4a, and one carried a missense mutation, in which the valine at position 115 was replaced with a glycine. The 113insArg mutant p16INK4a was unable to bind cdk4 and cdk6 in an in vitro binding assay. Six of the 113insArg families had at least one member with multiple primary melanomas; the 113insArg families also had a high frequency of other malignancies—in particular, breast cancer (a total of eight cases compared with the expected 2.1; P = .0014) and pancreatic cancer (a total of six cases compared with the expected 0.16; P <.0001). Families with breast cancer also had a propensity for multiple melanomas in females, suggesting that a sex-dependent factor may modify the phenotypic expression of CDKN2A alterations. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that the majority of CDKN2A-associated melanoma families in Sweden are due to a single founder mutation. They also show that families with the CDKN2A 113insArg mutation have an increased risk not only of multiple melanomas and pancreatic carcinoma but also of breast cancer.
    JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute 08/2000; · 15.16 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In a new population-based, matched, case-control study from southern Sweden of 571 patients with a first diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma, between 1995 and 1997, and 913 healthy controls aged 16 to 80 years, the association between sunscreen use and malignant melanoma was evaluated. The median sun protection factor (SPF) used by both cases and controls was 6, range 2 to 25. Sunscreen users reported greater sun exposure than non-users. Persons who used sunscreens did not have a decreased risk of malignant melanoma. Instead, a significantly elevated odds ratio (OR) for developing malignant melanoma after regular sunscreen use was found, adjusted for history of sunburns, hair color, frequency of sunbathing during the summer, and duration of each sunbathing occasion [OR = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–2.9]. The OR was higher in subjects who reported that sunscreen use enabled them to spend more time sunbathing (adjusted OR = 8.7, 95% CI 1.0–75.8 for always vs. never use). The association appeared to hold for subjects who did not suffer from sunburns while using sunscreens, for subjects who used SPF of 10 or lower, and among men. The pattern of a significantly increased melanoma risk was seen only for lesions of the trunk. Our results are probably related mainly to earlier sunscreens of low SPF. They substantiate the hypothesis that sunscreen use, by permitting more time sunbathing, is associated with melanoma occurrence. Int. J. Cancer 87:145–150, 2000. © 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 06/2000; 87(1):145 - 150. · 6.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In a population-based, matched, case-control study from southern Sweden of 571 patients with a first diagnosis of cutaneous malignant melanoma and 913 healthy controls aged 16-80 years, the association between sunbed use and malignant melanoma was evaluated. A total of 250 (44%) cases and 372 (41%) controls reported ever having used sunbeds. A significantly elevated odds ratio for developing malignant melanoma after regular exposure to sunbeds was found, adjusted for hair colour, raised naevi, skin type and number of sunburns (odds ratio (OR) 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-2.7). A dose-response relationship between total number of sunbed uses and melanoma risk was only found up to the level of 250 times. The OR was higher in individuals younger than age 36 years (adjusted OR 8.1, 95% CI 1.3-49.5 for regular vs. never use). The association seemed to be true only for subjects with black/dark brown or light brown hair and among females. Lesions of the extremities showed the strongest association of increased risk with sunbed use. An increased risk was related to commercial exposure and to exposure during the winter. The results substantiate the hypothesis that exposure to sunbeds might increase the risk of developing malignant melanoma.
    British Journal of Cancer 06/2000; 82(9):1593-9. · 4.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this population-based, case-control study from Sweden using data collected from 1988 to 1990, an increased risk of melanoma was associated with the number of sunburns, propensity to freckle, the number of raised naevi and a family history of melanoma. Furthermore, a decreased risk was associated with occupational sun exposure. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether different histopathological features of the melanoma and clinical factors were related to the different aetiological risk factor patterns. All the confirmed primary cutaneous melanomas (n = 366) were included in the study. Both univariate analyses with tests for interaction and multivariate analyses were performed. Patients with melanoma on the trunk and patients with thin melanomas had an excess of close relatives with a history of melanoma (odds ratios [ORs] = 2.7 and 2.3, respectively). A relationship was also seen between melanomas in younger persons and a family history of melanoma (OR = 2.6). The presence of raised naevi on the arm had a tendency to be closer related to melanoma of the nodular type (OR = 4.3) than melanoma of the superficial spreading type (OR = 1.6). Patients with outdoor occupations during summer had a decreased risk of developing melanoma on the extremities. Melanoma diagnosed in patients born before 1939 had an association with sunburns (OR = 1.9) and freckling (OR = 2.0), while melanomas in patients born in 1939 or later were related to a family history of melanoma (OR = 2.2). These results suggest that different histopathological and clinical features of melanoma are associated with different risk factor patterns, which may imply diverging tumour genesis.
    Melanoma Research 05/1999; 9(2):189-97. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is a worldwide increase in the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) among whites. In Sweden, a five-fold increase has been recorded since 1960, although the increase in mortality rate is substantially lower. Tumor thickness is recognized as the most important histologic prognostic factor for primary melanoma. In a previous study, the authors did not find any significant decrease in mean tumor thickness over the period 1965-1985 in their region. In the current study, prognostic factors for melanoma were evaluated for this time period. In a population-based study, 468 cases of invasive melanoma, diagnosed in the years 1965, 1975, and 1985, were histopathologically reexamined. The level of invasion, tumor thickness, regressive reaction, ulceration, presence of inflammatory cells, presence of benign nevus cells, and site of presentation were studied. In 461 of these 468 patients, it was possible to correlate the histopathologic factors with survival. In univariate analyses, the parameters of presence of ulceration, increasing tumor thickness, male gender, nodular type of melanoma, and older age at diagnosis were significantly related to a shortened overall survival. In various multivariate models with adjustment for age and the factors studied simultaneously, ulceration, increasing tumor thickness, and male gender were significantly associated with a poor prognosis. Correlations between the factors studied were noted. It was observed that older patients tended to have thicker tumors. Thick melanomas correlated to a deeper level of invasion (Clark's), nodular growth pattern, ulceration, less inflammation, and less regression compared with thin, less invasive melanomas. Women had significantly fewer inflammatory cells and fewer signs of regression in their tumors compared with men. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, increasing tumor thickness, older age, ulceration, and male gender were significantly associated with a poor prognosis among patients with invasive CMM. None of these factors showed a significant change for the years 1965, 1975, and 1985. Thus, a change in the prognostic factors studied does not explain the increased survival of melanoma patients for this time period.
    Cancer 02/1997; 79(2):275-83. · 4.90 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In a population-based, matched case-control study from southern Sweden of 400 patients with a first diagnosis of malignant melanoma and 640 healthy control subjects aged 15-75 years, the association between commonly prescribed drugs, alcohol, smoking and malignant melanoma was evaluated. In addition, the relation between reproductive and hormonal factors and melanoma in women was studied. It was found that certain specific types of prescribed drugs, i.e. beta-blockers, hydralazines and benzodiazepines, may increase the risk of melanoma development. However, these associations were diminished, at least for benzodiazepines, after controlling for host factors. As these findings are unconfirmed, and may be due to chance or confounding, further studies are warranted. The risk of malignant melanoma was not influenced by alcohol consumption or smoking habits. Our results do not suggest an association between oral contraceptives and melanoma. Furthermore, reproductive factors were not independent risk factors for melanoma. However, increasing number of live births seemed to be protective (P for trend = 0.01). There is a need for further research to be able to draw firm conclusions on the relation between number of live births and melanoma. The results based on histopathological re-examinations and those based on tumour registry data were essentially the same.
    British Journal of Cancer 06/1996; 73(9):1126-31. · 4.82 Impact Factor
  • Acta Soc Med Suec; 01/1996
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The relation between use of sunscreens, different host factors and malignant melanoma was investigated in a population-based, matched case-control study of malignant melanoma in the South Swedish Health Care Region, which has the highest risk for melanoma in Sweden, between 1 July 1988 and 30 June 1990. In total, 400 melanoma patients and 640 healthy controls aged 15-75 years answered a comprehensive questionnaire regarding different epidemiologic variables, including questions on use of sunscreens and different constitutional factors. The use of sunscreens was not found to protect against developing malignant melanoma. Instead, an unexpected relation between the use of sunscreens and the risk of developing malignant melanoma was seen (odds ratio (OR) 1.8 for almost always vs never using sunscreens). A tentative dose-response relation was found. Virtually the same ORs were seen in both sexes. Furthermore, persons younger than 50 years had a higher OR than persons older than 50 years. When different melanoma presentation sites were considered, lesions of the trunk were associated with sunscreen use in females (adjusted OR = 3.7 for almost always vs never using sunscreens), while lesions of the extremity or head and neck were associated with sunscreen use in males (adjusted OR = 3.2 for almost always vs never using sunscreens). Raised naevi on the left arm and freckling were shown to be the major constitutional risk factors (OR = 3.9 for more than three naevi vs none and OR = 1.4, respectively). The results were essentially unaltered in a histopathologically re-examined material. Further investigations are needed in order to form a basis for melanoma prevention.
    Melanoma Research 03/1995; 5(1):59-65. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In a population-based, matched case-control study from the South Swedish Health Care Region, which has the highest risk for melanoma in Sweden, the relation between the use of sunbeds or sunlamps and malignant melanoma was investigated . Between July 1, 1988, and June 30, 1990, a total of 400 melanoma patients and 640 healthy controls aged 15–75 years answered a comprehensive questionnaire containing different epidemiologic variables. Questions regarding the use of sunbeds or sunlamps were included. The odds ratio for developing malignant melanoma after ever having used sunbeds or sunlamps was 1.3. Considering all age groups, the odds ratio was significantly elevated after exposure more than 10 times a year to sunbeds or sun-lamps (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8). When the study was restricted to patients and controls younger than age 30 years because the use of tanning devices is much more common among young persons, the odds ratio was higher (OR = 7.7 for more than 10 times a year vs. none). These findings were independent of constitutional factors and factors regarding sun exposure. A dose-response relation was evident. Furthermore, among melanoma patients in this young age group, the ratio of females to males was significantly higher than in older patients. When different melanoma presentation sites were considered, only lesions of the trunk were significantly associated with sunbed or sunlamp use (OR = 4.2 for more than 10 times a year vs. none).
    American Journal of Epidemiology 11/1994; · 4.98 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

857 Citations
146.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2014
    • Skåne University Hospital
      Malmö, Skåne, Sweden
  • 1994–2014
    • Lund University
      • • Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Oncology
      • • Department of Clinical Sciences
      • • Department of Dermatology and Venerology
      • • Department of Surgery
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 2011
    • Karolinska Institutet
      Solna, Stockholm, Sweden