B Bättig

University of Zurich, Zürich, ZH, Switzerland

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Publications (20)31.23 Total impact

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    B Baettig, W Haecki, F Lammer, R Jost
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    ABSTRACT: The findings from 480 patients who had emergency endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding of non-variceal origin at our institution were analysed. Twenty eight patients (5.8%) had a Dieulafoy lesion. In 27 patients (96.4%) bleeding could be successfully managed by injection of norepinephrine and polidocanol, in repeated sessions if needed. Two patients had to be treated surgically: one because of uncontrollable bleeding from the Dieulafoy lesion and one despite endoscopic control of the bleeding Dieulafoy lesion because of a concomitant bleeding from an anastomosal ulcer after gastric resection. Three patients died during hospital stay from causes unrelated to bleeding from Dieulafoy lesion. Out of the 25 patients discharged from the hospital 21 treated by endoscopy and two treated with surgery were followed up for a mean of 28.3 and 22.5 months, respectively. Twenty endoscopically treated patients (95%) had no recurrence of Dieulafoy's bleeding. One patient experienced severe rebleeding from the original site after a transient endoscopy confirmed complete disappearance. He had emergency operation without a further attempt to control bleeding by endoscopy. It is concluded that bleeding from Dieulafoy's disease can be successfully managed by endoscopic injection treatment. The longterm outcome is favourable.
    Gut 11/1993; 34(10):1418-21. · 10.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the antihypertensive efficacy and tolerability of a single morning dose of either 10 mg bisoprolol (n = 26) or 20 mg nitrendipine (n = 27) were investigated. Blood pressure was measured by three techniques: (1) Casual blood pressure 24 h after the dose; (2) ambulatory 24-h whole-day monitoring; and (3) self-recorded blood pressure in the morning 24 h after the dose (6-8 a.m.) and in the evening (6-8 p.m.). After 4 weeks of therapy bisoprolol had produced a highly significant reduction in blood pressure as assessed by causal, ambulatory day- and night-time monitoring, and self-measured morning and evening readings. Bisoprolol was significantly more effective than nitrendipine, which did not induce a significant reduction in the ambulatory night-time recordings. Whole-day ambulatory blood pressure profiles showed an antihypertensive effect of bisoprolol throughout the entire 24-h period. 24-h blood pressure curves after nitrendipine demonstrated a markedly shorter duration of action, with no reduction in early morning blood pressure. Adverse effects and tolerability of the two drugs were comparable. The average changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure after bisoprolol and nitrendipine in 2-h periods of ambulatory monitoring (6-8 a.m. and 6-8 p.m.) and self-measured blood pressure (6-8 a.m. and 6-8 p.m.) showed a good agreement between ambulatory and self-measured blood pressure determinations with no significant difference between the methods. The results show that 24 h antihypertensive efficacy was more pronounced for bisoprolol than for nitrendipine at the doses studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 02/1992; 42(6):569-75. · 2.74 Impact Factor
  • Journal of hypertension. Supplement: official journal of the International Society of Hypertension 01/1992; 9(6):S336-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Possible errors in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension are discussed. The problems of blood pressure determinations are reviewed by comparing the results of sphygmomanometry in the doctor's office, of automated ambulatory blood pressure recording and of blood pressure self-measurement. In screening for renovascular hypertension one should be aware that no test is yet available which shows adequate sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, the only investigation that should be used to demonstrate a true stenosis is arteriography. When treating hypertensives it must be kept in mind that the benefits of antihypertensive medication, i.e. reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease, should exceed the costs and side effects of the treatment. Finally, the effects of reduction in dose and discontinuation of antihypertensive medication are discussed.
    Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift 06/1991; 121(19):677-82. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Home blood pressures are lower than casual blood pressures and this difference is probably due to physician-patient interaction in a clinical stress situation. In order to prove this assumption we compared the casual blood pressures of 127 subjects, measured by a physician and by the subjects themselves in the presence of the physician, with self-measured values obtained at home over a 7-day observation period. The casual pressures were higher than the home pressures (delta = 7.6/3.9 mmHg) regardless of whether they were taken by the physician or by the subjects themselves in the presence of the physician. The subjects' casual readings (132.9 +/- 17.5/87.6 +/- 12 mmHg) were slightly, but significantly, higher than those measured by the physician (131.9 +/- 18.4/86.3 +/- 12.6 mmHg) and both systolic and diastolic self-measured casual values were highly significantly correlated with the physician's readings (r = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively; P less than 0.01).
    Journal of hypertension. Supplement: official journal of the International Society of Hypertension 10/1990; 8(4):S15-9.
  • T Mengden, B Bättig, W Vetter
    Journal of Human Hypertension 03/1990; 4 Suppl 1:47-50. · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • A Steiner, B Baettig, W Vetter
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    ABSTRACT: An identical antihypertensive regimen with Metoprolol, a beta-blocking agent, was compared in two groups of patients with mild to moderate hypertension regarding effectiveness and side effects. 17 patients were treated by practitioners, 28 patients at the university clinic. The aim of the comparison was to appreciate possible effects of the clinical setting. With respect to the blood pressure reduction no difference was found between the two groups. Significant differences were noted however regarding side-effects. The practitioners reported fewer and less serious side-effects. This observation should caution about similar phenomena in similar studies and lead to modification of planning in future studies.
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 12/1989; 78(47):1307-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Up to now the diagnosis of hypertension has been based on a few casual blood pressure measurements in the physician's office according to WHO guidelines. Blood pressure measurements at home in the recent years have gained increasing popularity as a supplementary diagnostic tool. The establishment of an everyday blood pressure profile and exclusion of "white coat" hypertension are the main diagnostic indications. In borderline hypertension those patients with elevated home blood pressures can be identified. However world-wide epidemiologic studies are urgently needed to develop definitions of normal and pathological values for self-recorded blood pressure readings. From our experience diastolic home-recorded values higher than 90 mm Hg should be regarded as pathological.
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 12/1989; 78(48):1353-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Many patients measure their blood pressure without any instruction due to the availability of modern measuring devices. Although the technique can be mastered by most of the patients, some sources of error have to be eliminated. The aim of such an instruction is to explain these sources of error to the patients and to give them opportunity to practise the self measurement under medical supervision. An instruction sheet is handed out as a pamphlet. The patients are also directed to keep a record of all measurements which is periodically controlled by the physician. It is also advisable to reexamine the measuring technique of the patient from time to time and to check the accuracy of the patients measuring device.
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 12/1989; 78(48):1346-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Blood pressure values measured by the patients at home are lower than those measured during medical consultation. To test whether the person measuring the blood pressure is responsible for this difference, the blood pressure of 127 patients was measured first by the doctor and then by the patients themselves during the consultation. There was a good agreement and no significant difference between the two measurements. Values taken at home were however significantly lower. Our results indicate, that difference between clinic and home blood pressure values does not depend on the person performing the measurement.
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 12/1989; 78(48):1350-2.
  • B Bättig, A Steiner, T Jeck, W Vetter
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    ABSTRACT: In this study casual blood pressure was compared with home blood pressure measurement in 41 normotensive, 39 hypertensive and 21 borderline hypertensive subjects. The average casual readings for the whole group were 8.6 mmHg higher for systolic and 4.0 mmHg higher for diastolic pressures than self-determined values. Casual and home-registered blood pressures showed a highly significant relationship (P less than 0.001) for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings. In the distribution of self-measured diastolic blood pressure readings, normotensive subjects rarely (5%) showed values higher than 90 mmHg, whereas hypertensive subjects had a relatively high percentage of diastolic readings above that level (55%). The results confirm previous reports of lower self-determined than casual blood pressure values. However, the high correlation between these two methods of blood pressure measurement indicates that in general there is a quantitative rather than a qualitative difference between casual and self-registered blood pressures. Finally, self-registered diastolic values exceeding 90 mmHg may be interpreted as hypertensive.
    Journal of hypertension. Supplement: official journal of the International Society of Hypertension 06/1989; 7(3):S59-63.
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the antihypertensive and hypolipidaemic effects of fish oil containing eico-sapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in a capsule preparation in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension and in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. In addition, we used two independent procedures to analyse changes in blood pressure, casual and self-recorded blood pressure measurements. A very moderate blood pressure lowering effect of fish oil was confirmed in this study, and a slight antihyperlipidaemic effect in plasma triglycerides was demonstrated. During the fish oil treatment, casual blood pressure values were consistently lower than self-recorded values. It is assumed that this was an observer error due to knowledge of the treatment.
    Journal of hypertension. Supplement: official journal of the International Society of Hypertension 06/1989; 7(3):S73-6.
  • Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 11/1988; 77(41):1101-3.
  • Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 10/1988; 77(37):963-8.
  • B Baettig, F Keller, O Hess, W Vetter
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 12/1987; 76(48):1347-9.
  • B Bättig, W Vetter
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 09/1987; 76(33):913-4.
  • Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 05/1987; 76(17):462-6.
  • A P Marolf, S Hany, B Bättig, W Vetter
    Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 05/1987; 76(17):459-61.
  • Schweizerische Rundschau fur Medizin Praxis = Revue suisse de medecine Praxis 05/1987; 76(17):450-4.
  • A P Marolf, S Hany, B Bättig, W Vetter
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, self-determined, ambulatory and casual blood pressure measurements were studied in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. 31 patients were studied during a 7-day period: casual blood pressures were taken on the 1st, 4th and 7th day. Pressure monitoring for 24 h using a noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure recorder was performed on the 1st and 7th day. Patients recorded blood pressure daily at home at least 3 times each day. On the 1st day, the mean casual blood pressure was significantly higher than either mean self-determined blood pressure or mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. There was no significant difference between ambulatory daytime means and self-determined means. Casual blood pressures decreased from day 1 to day 7 significantly, while no significant difference in self-determined or ambulatory readings was observed. On the 7th day casual blood pressures were still significantly higher than self-determined measurements. Our results show that values obtained from daytime ambulatory measurements and self-determined measurements were equivalent. A fall in blood pressure with serial observations was found only in casual blood pressure, while no significant change occurred with either self-determined or ambulatory pressure. Since self-determined blood pressure measurements are easier and more economical to perform than ambulatory measurements, self-determined measurement is an excellent alternative to obtain representative blood pressure values for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension.
    Nephron 02/1987; 47 Suppl 1:142-5. · 13.26 Impact Factor