Are you for the Fermi-LAT collaboration?

Claim your profile

Publications (51)12 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PG 1553+113 is a very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter classified as a BL Lac object. Its redshift is constrained by intergalactic absorption lines in the range 0.4<z<0.58. The MAGIC telescopes have monitored the source's activity since 2005. In early 2012, PG 1553+113 was found in a high-state, and later, in April of the same year, the source reached the highest VHE flux state detected so far. Simultaneous observations carried out in X-rays during 2012 April show similar flaring behaviour. In contrast, the gamma-ray flux at E<100 GeV observed by Fermi-LAT is compatible with steady emission. In this paper, a detailed study of the flaring state is presented. The VHE spectrum shows clear curvature, being well fitted either by a power-law with an exponential cut-off or by a log-parabola. A simple power-law fit hypothesis for the observed shape of the PG 1553+113 VHE gamma-ray spectrum is rejected with a high significance (fit probability P=2.6 x 10^{-6}). For the first time a VHE spectral shape compatible with an exponential decay has been found in a distant blazar (z>0.2). The observed curvature is compatible with the extragalactic background light (EBL) imprint predicted by the current generation of EBL models assuming a redshift z~0.4. New constraints on the redshift were derived from the VHE spectrum. These constraints are compatible with previous limits and suggest that the source is most likely located around the optical lower limit, z=0.4. Finally, we find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model gives a satisfactory description of the observed multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution during the flare.
    08/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous observations with HESS have revealed the existence of an extended very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray source, HESS J1834-087, coincident with the SNR W41. The origin of the gamma-ray emission has been further investigated with HESS and the Fermi-LAT. The gamma-ray data provided by 61h (HESS) and 4 yrs (Fermi LAT) of observations cover over 5 decades in energy (1.8GeV - 30TeV). The morphology and spectrum of the TeV and GeV sources have been studied and multi-wavelength data have been used to investigate the origin of the observed emission. The TeV source can be modeled with a sum of two components: one point-like and one significantly extended (sig_TeV = 0.17{\deg}), both centered on SNR W41 and exhibiting spectra described by a power law of index 2.6. The GeV source detected with Fermi is extended (sig_GeV =0.15{\deg}) and morphologically matches the VHE emission. Its spectrum can be described by a power-law with index 2.15 and joins smoothly the one of the whole TeV source. A break appears in the spectra around 100 GeV. Two main scenarios are proposed to explain the emission: a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or the interaction of SNR W41 with a molecular cloud. X-ray observations suggest the presence of a point-like source (pulsar candidate) near the center of the SNR and non-thermal X-ray diffuse emission which could arise from a potential PWN. The PWN scenario is supported by the match of of the TeV and GeV positions with the putative pulsar. However, the overall spectrum is reproduced by a 1-zone leptonic model only if an excess of low-energy electrons is injected by a high spin-down power pulsar. This low-energy component is not needed if the point-like TeV source is unrelated to the extended GeV and TeV sources. The interacting SNR scenario is supported by the spatial coincidence between the gamma-ray sources, the detection of OH maser lines and the hadronic modeling.
    07/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal an unexpected hardening in the proton and He spectra above a few hundred GeV, a gradual softening of the spectra just below a few hundred GeV, and a harder spectrum of He compared to that of protons. These newly-discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of high-energy CRs. We use the ${\it Fermi}$ Large Area Telescope observations of the $\gamma$-ray emission from the Earth's limb for an indirect measurement of the local spectrum of CR protons in the energy range $\sim 90~$GeV-$6~$TeV (derived from a photon energy range $15~$GeV-$1~$TeV). Our analysis shows that single power law and broken power law spectra fit the data equally well and yield a proton spectrum with index $2.68 \pm 0.04$ and $2.61 \pm 0.08$ above $\sim 200~$GeV, respectively.
    03/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The nearby active galaxy IC 310 (z=0.019), located in the Perseus cluster of galaxies is a bright and variable multi-wavelength emitter from the radio regime up to very high gamma-ray energies above 100 GeV. Very recently, a blazar-like compact radio jet has been found by parsec-scale VLBI imaging. Along with the unusually flat gamma-ray spectrum and variable high-energy emission, this suggests that IC 310 is the closest known blazar and therefore a key object for AGN research. As part of an intense observing program at TeV energies with the MAGIC telescopes, an exceptionally bright flare of IC 310 was detected in November 2012 reaching a flux level of up to >0.5 Crab units above 300 GeV. We have organized a multi-wavelength follow-up program, including the VLBA, Effelsberg 100 m, KVA, Swift, INTEGRAL, Fermi/LAT, and the MAGIC telescopes. We present preliminary results from the multi-wavelength follow-up program with the focus on the response of the jet to this exceptional gamma-ray flare.
    08/2013;
  • Source
    T. J. Brandt, J. Ballet, F. de Palma, G. Johannesson, L. Tibaldo, for the Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Galactic interstellar emission contributes substantially to Fermi LAT observations in the Galactic plane, the location of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs). To explore some systematic effects on SNRs' properties caused by interstellar emission modeling, we have developed a method comparing the official LAT interstellar emission model results to eight alternative models. We created the eight alternative Galactic interstellar models by varying a few input parameters to GALPROP, namely the height of the cosmic ray propagation halo, cosmic ray source distribution in the Galaxy, and atomic hydrogen spin temperature. We have analyzed eight representative SNRs chosen to encompass a range of Galactic locations, extensions, and spectral properties using the eight different interstellar emission models. We will present the results and method in detail and discuss the implications for studies such as the 1st Fermi LAT SNR Catalog.
    07/2013;
  • Source
    Gudlaugur Johannesson, Elena Orlando, for the Fermi-LAT collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Sun and the Moon are quiescent gamma-ray sources that are clearly detectable in Fermi-LAT data. While moving through the sky, the Sun and the Moon can be a significant background in the analysis of Fermi-LAT data if they pass through the region of interest. Accurate modeling of their intensity is needed in this case, accounting for the correct exposure of their track along the sky. We present the Solar System Tools (SST) which calculate the templates of the Sun's and the Moon's intensity in the sky for a given observing period and a model of their steady emission. These tools are available in the standard Fermi-LAT Science Tools.
    06/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The detailed origin of the diffuse gamma-ray background is still unknown. However, the contribution of unresolved sources is expected to induce small-scale anisotropies in this emission, which may provide a way to identify and constrain the properties of its contributors. Recent studies have predicted the contributions to the angular power spectrum (APS) from extragalactic and galactic dark matter (DM) annihilation or decay. The Fermi-LAT collaboration reported detection of angular power with a significance larger than $3\sigma$ in the energy range from 1 GeV to 10 GeV on 22 months of data [Ackermann et al. 2012]. For these preliminary results the already published Fermi-LAT APS measurements [Ackermann et al. 2012] are compared to the accurate predictions for DM anisotropies from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations as presented in [Fornasa et al. 2013] to derive constraints on different DM candidates.
    03/2013;
  • S Ciprini, Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    American Institute of Physics Conference Series; 12/2012
  • S Cutini, S Ciprini, S Larsson, M Orienti, F D'Ammando, Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    American Institute of Physics Conference Series; 12/2012
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: [Abridged] Context. To construct and interpret the spectral energy distribution (SED) of BL Lacertae objects, simultaneous broad-band observations are mandatory. Aims. We present the results of a dedicated multi-wavelength study of the high-frequency peaked BL Lacertae (HBL) object and known TeV emitter 1ES 2344+514 by means of a pre-organised campaign. Methods. The observations were conducted during simultaneous visibility windows of MAGIC and AGILE in late 2008. The measurements were complemented by Mets\"ahovi, RATAN-600, KVA+Tuorla, Swift and VLBA pointings. Additional coverage was provided by the ongoing long-term F-GAMMA and MOJAVE programs, the OVRO 40-m and CrAO telescopes as well as the Fermi satellite. The obtained SEDs are modelled using a one-zone as well as a self-consistent two-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. Results. 1ES 2344+514 was found at very low flux states in both X-rays and very high energy gamma rays. Variability was detected in the low frequency radio and X-ray bands only, where for the latter a small flare was observed. The X-ray flare was possibly caused by shock acceleration characterised by similar cooling and acceleration time scales. MOJAVE VLBA monitoring reveals a static jet whose components are stable over time scales of eleven years, contrary to previous findings. There appears to be no significant correlation between the 15 GHz and R-band monitoring light curves. The observations presented here constitute the first multi-wavelength campaign on 1ES 2344+514 from radio to VHE energies and one of the few simultaneous SEDs during low activity states. The quasi-simultaneous Fermi-LAT data poses some challenges for SED modelling, but in general the SEDs are described well by both applied models. The resulting parameters are typical for TeV emitting HBLs. Consequently it remains unclear whether a so-called quiescent state was found in this campaign.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 11/2012; 556. · 5.08 Impact Factor
  • Source
    M. Orienti, F. D'Ammando, M. Giroletti, for the Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The detection by Fermi-LAT of gamma-ray emission from radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1s (NLS1s) indicates that relativistic jets do not form only in blazars and radio galaxies, but also in other AGN populations. Despite a spectral energy distribution similar to blazars, their physical characteristics are quite different: lower black hole masses, generally higher accretion rates, and possibly hosted in spirals. Furthermore, their radio properties make the interpretation of these objects even more puzzling. The radio emission is very compact, not exceeding the parsec scales, as also found in the population of young radio sources. We present high resolution VLBA observations of three radio-loud NLS1s detected by Fermi-LAT: SBS 0846+513, PKS 1502+036, and PKS 2004-447. The information on the pc-scale morphology will be complemented with studies of flux density and spectral variability from multi-epoch and multifrequency observations, in order to unveil the nature of their radio emission.
    05/2012;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.
    Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics 02/2012; 2012(02):012. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Bijan Berenji, Elliott Bloom, Johann Cohen-Tanugi, for the Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {\gamma}{\gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.
    Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics - JCAP. 01/2012; 2012(02).
  • Source
    S. Ciprini, D. Gasparrini, D. Bastieri, J. Chiang, G. Tosti, for the Fermi-LAT collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Fermi Flare Advocate (also known as Gamma-ray Sky Watcher, FA-GSW) service provides for a daily quicklook analysis and review of the high-energy gamma-ray sky seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The duty offers alerts for potentially new gamma-ray sources, interesting transients and relevant flares. A public weekly digest containing the main highlights about the GeV gamma-ray sky is published in the web-based Fermi Sky Blog. During the first 3 years of all-sky survey, more than 150 Astronomical Telegrams, several alerts to the TeV Cherenkov telescopes, and targets of opportunity to Swift and other observatories have been realized. This increased the rate of simultaneous multi-frequency observing campaigns and the level of international cooperation. Many gamma-ray flares from blazars (like extraordinary outbursts of 3C 454.3, intense flares of PKS 1510-089, 4C 21.35, PKS 1830-211, AO 0235+164, PKS 1502+106, 3C 279, 3C 273, PKS 1622-253), short/long flux duty cycles, unidentified transients near the Galactic plane (like J0910-5041, J0109+6134, the Galactic center region), flares associated to Galactic sources (like the Crab nebula, the nova V407 Cyg, the microquasar Cyg X-3), emission of the quiet and active sun, were observed by Fermi and communicated by FA-GSWs.
    11/2011;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The giant radio galaxy M 87, with its proximity (16 Mpc) and its very massive black hole ((3 - 6) \times 10^9 M_solar), provides a unique laboratory to investigate very high energy (E>100 GeV; VHE) gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei and, thereby, probe particle acceleration to relativistic energies near supermassive black holes (SMBH) and in relativistic jets. M 87 has been established as a VHE gamma-ray emitter since 2005. The VHE gamma-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In 2008, a rise in the 43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio emission of the innermost region (core; extension of < 100 Rs ; Schwarzschild radii) was found to coincide with a flaring activity at VHE. This had been interpreted as a strong indication that the VHE emission is produced in the direct vicinity of the SMBH. In 2010 a flare at VHE was again detected triggering further multi-wavelength (MWL) observations with the VLBA, Chandra, and other instruments. At the same time, M 87 was also observed with the Fermi-LAT telescope at MeV/GeV energies, the European VLBI Network (EVN), and the Liverpool Telescope (LT). Here, preliminary results from the 2010 campaign will be reported.
    International Journal of Modern Physics Conference Series. 11/2011;
  • Source
    Alex Drlica-Wagner, Ping Wang, Elliott Bloom, Louis Strigari, for the Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a search for Galactic dark matter (DM) satellites using the Large Area Telescope (LAT). N-body simulations based on the Lambda-CDM model of cosmology predict a large number of as yet unobserved Galactic DM satellites. These satellites could potentially produce gamma rays through the self-annihilation of DM particles. Some DM satellites are expected to have hard gamma-ray spectra, finite angular extents, and a lack of counterparts at other wavelengths. We searched for LAT sources with these characteristics. We found no candidate DM satellites matching these criteria in one year of LAT data and interpreted this result in the context of N-body simulations.
    11/2011;
  • Source
    Alex Drlica-Wagner, Eric Charles, for the Fermi-LAT Collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Large Area Telescope (LAT) event analysis is the final stage in the event reconstruction responsible for the creation of high-level variables (e.g., event energy, incident direction, particle type, etc.). We discuss the development of TMine, a powerful new tool for designing and implementing event classification analyses (e.g., distinguishing photons from charged particles). TMine is structured on ROOT, a data analysis framework that is the de-facto standard for current high energy physics experiments; thus, TMine fits naturally into the ROOT-based data processing pipeline of the LAT. TMine provides a visual development environment for the LAT event analysis and utilizes advanced multivariate classification algorithms implemented in ROOT. We discuss the application of TMine to the next iteration of the event analysis (Pass 8), the LAT charged particle analyses, and the classification of unassociated LAT gamma-ray sources.
    11/2011;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Blazars are jet-dominated extragalactic objects characterized by the emission of strongly variable non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, the study of blazars (and in general of radio loud AGN) through the use of multi-frequency simultaneous data is essential in order to understand the physical processes that take place in these objects. With Planck, Fermi and Swift simultaneously on orbit, complemented with other space and ground-based observatories, it is possible to assemble high-quality multi-frequency simultaneous broad-band spectra of large and statistically well-defined samples of radio-loud AGN. In particular, four samples of sources have been selected. The first three samples are flux limited in the high energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum: the soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) sample includes 43 sources from the Rosat All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog, the hard X-ray (15-150 keV) sample includes 34 sources from the Swift-BAT 54 months source catalog and the gamma-ray sample includes 50 sources from the Fermi-LAT 3 months Bright AGN Source List. The fourth sample is radio flux limited, including 104 bright northern and equatorial radio-loud AGN (most of which have been monitored at Metsahovi Radio Observatory for many years) with average radio flux density at 37 GHz greater than 1 Jy. We present the methods applied and the results of the analysis performed using Fermi-LAT data for all sources in the four different samples of AGN.
    11/2011;
  • Source
    M. Llena Garde, J. Conrad, J Cohen-Tanugi, for the Fermi-LAT collaboration, M. Kaplinghat, G. Martinez
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dwarf spheroidal galaxies have a large mass to light ratio and low astrophysical background, and are therefore considered one of the most promising targets for dark matter searches in the gamma-ray band. By applying a joint likelihood analysis, the power of resultant limits in case of no detection can be enhanced and robust constraints on the dark matter parameter space can be obtained. We present results from a combined analysis of 10 dwarf spheroidal galaxies using Fermi-LAT data. Different annihilation channels have been analyzed and uncertainties from astrophysical properties have been taken into account.
    11/2011;
  • Source
    D. Hadasch, for the Fermi-LAT collaboration
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has made the first definitive GeV detections of the binaries LS I +61^{\circ}303 and LS5039 in the first year after its launch in August 2008. These detections were unambiguous because, apart from a reduced positional uncertainty, the gamma-ray emission in each case was orbitally modulated with the corresponding orbital period. The LAT results posed new questions about the nature of these objects, after the unexpected observation of an exponential cutoff in the GeV gamma-ray spectra of both LS I +61^{\circ}303 and LS5039, at least along part of their orbital motion. We present here the analysis of new data from the LAT, comprising 2.5 years of observations through which LS I +61^{\circ}303 continues to provide some surprises. We find an increase in flux in March 2009 and a steady decrease in the flux fraction modulation. The LAT now detects emission up to 30 GeV, where prior datasets led to upper limits only. At the same time, contemporaneous TeV observations either no longer detected the source, or found it -at least in some orbits- close to periastron, far from the usual phases in which the source usually appeared at TeV energies. The on-source exposure of LS 5039 has also drastically increased along the last years, and whilst our analysis shows no new behavior in comparison with our earlier report, the higher statistics of the current dataset allows for a deeper investigation of its orbital and spectral evolution.
    11/2011;