Zachary S Fredericksen

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Rochester, MI, United States

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Publications (111)668.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age <=50 years.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 05/2014; 16(3):R51. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To report the design and implementation of the first 3 years of enrollment of the Mayo Clinic Biobank. Preparations for this biobank began with a 4-day Deliberative Community Engagement with local residents to obtain community input into the design and governance of the biobank. Recruitment, which began in April 2009, is ongoing, with a target goal of 50,000. Any Mayo Clinic patient who is 18 years or older, able to consent, and a US resident is eligible to participate. Each participant completes a health history questionnaire, provides a blood sample, and allows access to existing tissue specimens and all data from their Mayo Clinic electronic medical record. A community advisory board provides ongoing advice and guidance on complex decisions. After 3 years of recruitment, 21,736 individuals have enrolled. Fifty-eight percent (12,498) of participants are female and 95% (20,541) of European ancestry. Median participant age is 62 years. Seventy-four percent (16,171) live in Minnesota, with 42% (9157) from Olmsted County, where the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is located. The 5 most commonly self-reported conditions are hyperlipidemia (8979, 41%), hypertension (8174, 38%), osteoarthritis (6448, 30%), any cancer (6224, 29%), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (5669, 26%). Among patients with self-reported cancer, the 5 most common types are nonmelanoma skin cancer (2950, 14%), prostate cancer (1107, 12% in men), breast cancer (941, 4%), melanoma (692, 3%), and cervical cancer (240, 2% in women). Fifty-six percent (12,115) of participants have at least 15 years of electronic medical record history. To date, more than 60 projects and more than 69,000 samples have been approved for use. The Mayo Clinic Biobank has quickly been established as a valuable resource for researchers.
    Mayo Clinic Proceedings 09/2013; 88(9):952-62. · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the association of dietary fat and protein intake with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in a clinic-based study in 603 cases (including 218 chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, 146 follicular lymphoma, and 105 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) and 1007 frequency-matched controls. Usual diet was assessed with a 128-item food-frequency questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs, and polytomous logistic regression was used to assess subtype-specific risks. trans Fatty acid (TFA) intake was positively associated with NHL risk [OR = 1.60 for highest vs. lowest quartile (95% CI = 1.18, 2.15); P-trend = 0.0014], n3 (ω3) fatty acid intake was inversely associated with risk [OR = 0.48 (95% CI = 0.35, 0.65); P-trend < 0.0001], and there was no association with total, animal, plant-based, or saturated fat intake. When examining intake of specific foods, processed meat [OR = 1.37 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.83); P-trend = 0.03], milk containing any fat [OR = 1.47 (95% CI = 1.16, 1.88); P-trend = 0.0025], and high-fat ice cream [OR = 4.03 (95% CI = 2.80, 5.80); P-trend < 0.0001], intakes were positively associated with risk, whereas intakes of fresh fish and total seafood [OR = 0.61 (95% CI = 0.46, 0.80); P-trend = 0.0025] were inversely associated with risk. Overall, there was little evidence for NHL subtype-specific heterogeneity. In conclusion, diets high in TFAs, processed meats, and higher fat dairy products were positively associated with NHL risk, whereas diets high in n3 fatty acids and total seafood were inversely associated with risk.
    Journal of Nutrition 03/2013; · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.
    PLoS Genetics 03/2013; 9(3):e1003212. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7x10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4x10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4x10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2x10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.
    01/2013: pages e1003212;
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (PA) during adulthood and at the age of 18 years with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). METHODS: We enrolled 950 newly diagnosed NHL patients and 1146 frequency-matched clinic-based controls. Height, weight, and PA (recent adult and at the age of 18 years) were self-reported. Odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals, and tests for trend were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, and residence. RESULTS: BMI at the age of 18 years was associated with an increased NHL risk (OR, 1.38 for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend = .0012), which on stratified analysis was specific to females (OR, 1.90; p-trend = .00025). There was no association of adult BMI with NHL risk. Higher PA in adulthood (OR, 1.03; p-trend = .85) or at the age of 18 years (OR, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.07) was not associated with risk, but there was an inverse association for adult PA that was specific to females (OR, 0.71; p-trend = .039). Only BMI at the age of 18 years remained significantly associated with NHL risk when modeled together with PA in adulthood or at the age of 18 years. There was little evidence for heterogeneity in these results for the common NHL subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: Early adult BMI may be of greatest relevance to NHL risk, particularly in females.
    Annals of epidemiology 11/2012; · 2.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The associations between diabetes, smoking, obesity and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) risk remain inconclusive. Metformin is purportedly associated with a reduced risk for various cancers. This case-control study evaluated risk factors for ICC and explored the effects of metformin on ICC risk in a clinic/hospital-based cohort. ICC patients seen at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN between January 2000 and May 2010 were identified. Age, sex, ethnicity, and residential area-matched controls were selected from among Mayo Clinic Biobank participants. The associations between potential factors and ICC risk were determined. Six hundred and twelve cases and 594 controls were identified. Factors associated with increased ICC risk included biliary tract diseases (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 81.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.2-598.8, P<0.001), cirrhosis (AOR 8.0, 95%CI: 1.8-36.5, P=0.007), diabetes (AOR 3.6, 95%CI: 2.3-5.5, P<0.001), and smoking (AOR 1.6, 95%CI: 1.3-2.1, P<0.001). Compared to diabetic patients not treated with metformin, odds ratio (OR) for ICC for diabetic patients treated with metformin was significantly decreased (OR 0.4, 95%CI: 0.2-0.9, P=0.04). Obesity and metabolic syndrome were not associated with ICC. Conclusion: This study confirmed diabetes and smoking as independent risk factors for ICC. A novel finding was that treatment with metformin was significantly associated with a 60% reduction in ICC risk in diabetic patients. (HEPATOLOGY 2012.).
    Hepatology 10/2012; · 12.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.55, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.92, p = 6.0 × 10(-5)]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here, we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95 % CI 0.96-1.24, p = 0.18). No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 09/2012; 136(1):295-302. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Abnormal immune function is a key factor in predisposition to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We evaluated the association of 30 cytokines individually and as a profile with diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) and follicular (FL) lymphomas. METHODS: We used a multiplexed assay to measure 30 cytokine concentrations in pre-treatment serum in a case-control study of 234 FL, 188 DLBCL, and 400 control participants. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age and sex, and polytomous regression was used to evaluate heterogeneity between FL and DLBCL. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to assess cytokine profiles associated with FL and DLBCL. RESULTS: In single cytokine modeling, we found that 12 of the 30 circulating serum cytokines were significantly (P<0.05) associated with FL and/or DLBCL after accounting for multiple testing (q<0.05). Soluble IL-2R (sIL-2R) had the strongest association with both FL (OR=6.0 for highest versus lowest tertile, 95% CI 3.8-9.5; p-trend=1.8×10(-21)) and DLBCL (OR=7.6, 95% CI 4.5-13.1; p-trend=7.2×10(-20)). IL1RA and IL-12p40 also showed similar associations for DLBCL and FL. In contrast, HGF, MIG, and MIP-1α had a stronger association with DLBCL compared to FL, and IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, IP-10, and VEGF were only statistically significantly associated with DLBCL after accounting for multiple testing. However, in PCA modeling, a cytokine profile based on sIL-2R, IL-1RA, MIG, IP-10, IL-8, and IL-12p40 explained most of the variability between controls and both FL and DLBCL. CONCLUSIONS: We identified some cytokines unique to DLBCL, but overall cytokine associations were more similar than distinct for DLBCL and FL. While these data are limited by concerns of reverse causality, they do suggest cytokines and cytokine profiles that can be prioritized in future studies.
    Cytokine 09/2012; · 2.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a malignancy of lymphocytes, and there is growing evidence for a role of germline genetic variation in immune genes in NHL etiology. To identify susceptibility immune genes, we conducted a 2-stage analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from 1,253 genes using the Immune and Inflammation Panel. In Stage 1, we genotyped 7,670 SNPs in 425 NHL cases and 465 controls, and in Stage 2 we genotyped the top 768 SNPs on an additional 584 cases and 768 controls. The association of individual SNPs with NHL risk from a log-additive model was assessed using the OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI). In the pooled analysis, only the TAP2 coding SNP rs241447 (minor allele frequency = 0.26; Thr655Ala) at 6p21.3 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.17-1.53) achieved statistical significance after accounting for multiple testing (P = 3.1 × 10(-5)). The TAP2 SNP was strongly associated with follicular lymphoma (FL, OR = 1.82, 95%CI 1.46-2.26; p = 6.9 × 10(-8)), and was independent of other known loci (rs10484561 and rs2647012) from this region. The TAP2 SNP was also associated with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, OR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.08-1.77; P = 0.011), but not chronic lymphocytic leukemia (OR = 1.08; 95% CI 0.88-1.32). Higher TAP2 expression was associated with the risk allele in both FL and DLBCL tumors. Genetic variation in TAP2 was associated with NHL risk overall, and FL risk in particular, and this was independent of other established loci from 6p21.3. Impact: Genetic variation in antigen presentation of HLA class I molecules may play a role in lymphomagenesis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(10); 1799-806. ©2012 AACR.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 08/2012; 21(10):1799-806. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p =
    PLoS ONE 06/2012; 7(6). · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 (HR, 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.92; P = 0.019) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.39-3.52, P = 0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class II mutations than class I mutations (class II HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.28-2.70; class I HR, 0.86; 95%CI, 0.69-1.09; P(difference), 0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers (HR, 2.42; P = 0.03). The IRS1 Gly972Arg single-nucleotide polymorphism, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers. These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 06/2012; 21(8):1362-70. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The variable penetrance of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify breast cancer risk. Two genes of special interest are prohibitin (PHB) and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), both of which are important either directly or indirectly in maintaining genomic integrity. To evaluate the potential role of genetic variants within PHB and MTHFR in breast and ovarian cancer risk, 4102 BRCA1 and 2093 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 6211 BRCA1 and 2902 BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (CIMBA) were genotyped for the PHB 1630 C>T (rs6917) polymorphism and the MTHFR 677 C>T (rs1801133) polymorphism, respectively. There was no evidence of association between the PHB 1630 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T polymorphisms with either disease for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers when breast and ovarian cancer associations were evaluated separately. Analysis that evaluated associations for breast and ovarian cancer simultaneously showed some evidence that BRCA1 mutation carriers who had the rare homozygote genotype (TT) of the PHB 1630 C>T polymorphism were at increased risk of both breast and ovarian cancer (HR 1.50, 95%CI 1.10-2.04 and HR 2.16, 95%CI 1.24-3.76, respectively). However, there was no evidence of association under a multiplicative model for the effect of each minor allele. The PHB 1630TT genotype may modify breast and ovarian cancer risks in BRCA1 mutation carriers. This association need to be evaluated in larger series of BRCA1 mutation carriers.
    British Journal of Cancer 06/2012; 106(12):2016-24. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AM), 9 Gene Environment Interaction and Breast Cancer in Germany (GENICA): Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, and University Tü bingen, Stuttgart and Tü bingen, Germany (HB, Christina Justenhoven); Molecular Genetics of Breast Cancer, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, Germany (UH); Department of Internal Medicine, Evangelische Kliniken Bonn gGmbH, Johanniter Krankenhaus, Bonn, Germany (YDK,); Institute of Pathology, Medical Faculty of the University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany (Hans-Peter Fischer); Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Bochum, Germany (Thomas Brü ning, Beate Pesch, Volker Harth, Sylvia Rabstein), 10 Amsterdam Breast Cancer Study (ABCS): Netherlands Cancer Institute, Departments of Experimental Therapy, Epidemiology and Molecular Pathology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (AB, MKS, LJVV, LMB), 11 British Breast Cancer Study (BBCS):
    PLoS ONE 06/2012; 6(7). · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The complement pathway plays a central role in innate immunity, and also functions as a regulator of the overall immune response. We evaluated whether polymorphisms in complement genes are associated with event-free survival (EFS) in follicular lymphoma (FL) and diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) lymphoma. We genotyped 167 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 30 complement pathway genes in a prospective cohort study of newly diagnosed FL (N = 107) and DLBCL (N = 82) patients enrolled at the Mayo Clinic from 2002 to 2005. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for individual SNPs with EFS, adjusting for FLIPI or IPI and treatment. For gene-level analyses, we used a principal components based gene-level test. In gene-level analyses for FL EFS, CFH (P = 0.009), CD55 (P = 0.006), CFHR5 (P = 0.01), C9 (P = 0.02), CFHR1 (P = 0.03), and CD46 (P = 0.03) were significant at P < 0.05, and these genes remained noteworthy after accounting for multiple testing (q < 0.15). SNPs in CFH, CFHR1, and CFHR5 showed stronger associations among patients receiving any rituximab, while SNPs from CD55 and CD46 showed stronger associations among patients who were observed. For DLBCL, only CLU (P = 0.001) and C7 (P = 0.03) were associated with EFS, but did not remain noteworthy after accounting for multiple testing (q>0.15). Genes from the regulators of complement activation (CFH, CD55, CFHR1, CFHR5, CD46) at 1q32-q32.1, along with C9, were associated with FL EFS after adjusting for clinical variables, and if replicated, these findings add further support for the role of host innate immunity in FL prognosis.
    American Journal of Hematology 05/2012; 87(9):880-5. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been hypothesized that vitamin D mediates the inverse relationship between sun exposure and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk reported in several recent studies. We evaluated the association of self-reported sun exposure at ages <13, 13-21, 22-40, and 41+ years and 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 4 candidate genes relevant to vitamin D metabolism (RXR, VDR , CYP24A1, CYP27B1) with NHL risk. This analysis included 1,009 newly diagnosed NHL cases and 1,233 frequency-matched controls from an ongoing clinic-based study. Odds ratios (OR), 95 % confidence intervals (CI), and tests for trend were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. There was a significant decrease in NHL risk with increased sun exposure at ages 13-21 years (OR(≥15 vs. ≤3 h/week) = 0.68; 95 % CI, 0.43-1.08; p(trend) = 0.0025), which attenuated for older ages at exposure. We observed significant main effect associations for 3 SNPs in VDR and 1 SNP in CYP24A1: rs886441 (OR(per-allele) = 0.82; 95 % CI, 0.70-0.96; p = 0.016), rs3819545 (OR(per-allele) = 1.24; 95 % CI, 1.10-1.40; p = 0.00043), and rs2239186 (OR(per-allele) = 1.22; 95 % CI, 1.05-1.41; p = 0.0095) for VDR and rs2762939 (OR(per-allele) = 0.85; 95 % CI, 0.75-0.98; p = 0.023) for CYP24A1. Moreover, the effect of sun exposure at age 13-21 years on overall NHL risk appears to be modified by germline variation in VDR (rs4516035; p(interaction) = 0.0066). Exploratory analysis indicated potential heterogeneity of these associations by NHL subtype. These results suggest that germline genetic variation in VDR, and therefore the vitamin D pathway, may mediate an association between early life sun exposure and NHL risk.
    Cancer Causes and Control 04/2012; 23(7):1017-29. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percent mammographic density adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI) is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and has a heritable component that remains largely unidentified. We performed a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of percent mammographic density to identify novel genetic loci associated with this trait. In stage 1, we combined three GWASs of percent density comprised of 1241 women from studies at the Mayo Clinic and identified the top 48 loci (99 single nucleotide polymorphisms). We attempted replication of these loci in 7018 women from seven additional studies (stage 2). The meta-analysis of stage 1 and 2 data identified a novel locus, rs1265507 on 12q24, associated with percent density, adjusting for age and BMI (P = 4.43 × 10(-8)). We refined the 12q24 locus with 459 additional variants (stage 3) in a combined analysis of all three stages (n = 10 377) and confirmed that rs1265507 has the strongest association in the 12q24 region (P = 1.03 × 10(-8)). Rs1265507 is located between the genes TBX5 and TBX3, which are members of the phylogenetically conserved T-box gene family and encode transcription factors involved in developmental regulation. Understanding the mechanism underlying this association will provide insight into the genetics of breast tissue composition.
    Human Molecular Genetics 04/2012; 21(14):3299-305. · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A recent two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified five novel breast cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9, 10, and 11. To provide more reliable estimates of the relative risk associated with these loci and investigate possible heterogeneity by subtype of breast cancer, we genotyped the variants rs2380205, rs1011970, rs704010, rs614367, and rs10995190 in 39 studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), involving 49,608 cases and 48,772 controls of predominantly European ancestry. Four of the variants showed clear evidence of association (P ≤ 3 × 10(-9) ) and weak evidence was observed for rs2380205 (P = 0.06). The strongest evidence was obtained for rs614367, located on 11q13 (per-allele odds ratio 1.21, P = 4 × 10(-39) ). The association for rs614367 was specific to estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease and strongest for ER plus progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer, whereas the associations for the other three loci did not differ by tumor subtype.
    Human Mutation 03/2012; 33(7):1123-32. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Overexpression of mitotic kinases has been associated with prognosis, histologic grade, and clinical stage in ovarian cancer, but the relationship between inherited variation in these genes and ovarian cancer risk has not been well defined. We measured associations between 397 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 67 mitotic kinases and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer risk in two case-control studies (n = 671 cases; n = 939 controls). Thirty-six candidate SNPs (P < 0.05) were assessed in a replication analysis consisting of three additional studies (n = 1,094 cases; n = 829 controls). In initial analysis, thirty-six SNPs were suggestive of association with risk of serous ovarian cancer, all subtypes of ovarian cancer, or both (P < 0.05). Replication analyses suggested an association between rs2125846 in the Nemo-like kinase (NLK) gene and ovarian cancer (serous OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.11-1.67, P = 1.77 × 10(-3); all subtypes OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.08-1.56, P = 2.97 × 10(-3)). Furthermore, rs2125846 was associated with risk in the combined discovery and replication sets (serous OR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.15-1.54; all subtypes OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.12-1.45). Variation in NLK may be associated with risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Further studies are needed to confirm and understand the biologic relationship between this mitotic kinase and ovarian cancer risk. An association between SNPs in NLK and ovarian cancer may provide biologic insight into the development of this disease.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 03/2012; 21(3):523-8. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 02/2012; 14(1):R33. · 5.87 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
668.95 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2013
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • • Department of Health Sciences Research
      • • Division of Epidemiology
      Rochester, MI, United States
  • 2006–2013
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • • Department of Health Science Research
      • • Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathology
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • University of Rochester
      • School of Medicine and Dentistry
      Rochester, NY, United States
    • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2011
    • University College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2009–2011
    • University of Cambridge
      • • Department of Public Health and Primary Care
      • • Department of Oncology
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
    • Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas
      • Human Cancer Genetics Programme
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2009–2010
    • Queensland Institute of Medical Research
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • 2008–2010
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      Bethesda, MD, United States