Zhanglin Ni

Acheuron Hungary Ltd., Algyő, Csongrád, Hungary

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Publications (13)48.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Previous work has shown that disruption of the gene for group X secreted phospholipase A (sPLA-X) markedly diminishes airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in a mouse asthma model. With the large number of additional sPLAs in the mammalian genome, the involvement of other sPLAs in the asthma model is possible - in particular, the group V sPLA (sPLA-V) that like sPLA-X is highly active at hydrolyzing membranes of mammalian cells. The allergen-driven asthma phenotype was significantly reduced in sPLA-V-deficient mice but to a lesser extent than observed previously in sPLA-X-deficient mice. The most striking difference observed between the sPLA-V and sPLA-X knockouts was the significant impairment of the primary immune response to the allergen ovalbumin (OVA) in the sPLA-V mice. The impairment in eicosanoid generation and dendritic cell activation in sPLA2-V mice diminishes Th2 cytokine responses in the airways. This paper illustrates the diverse roles of sPLAs in the immunopathogenesis of the asthma phenotype and directs attention to developing specific inhibitors of sPLA-V as a potential new therapy to treat asthma and other allergic disorders.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(2):e56172. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) confers multidrug resistance and mediates the active efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. BCRP contains one nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) followed by one membrane-spanning domain (MSD). We investigated whether prolines in or near the transmembrane helices are essential for BCRP function. Six proline residues were substituted with alanine individually, and the mutants were stably expressed in Flp-In(TM)-293 cells at levels comparable to that of wild-type BCRP and predominantly localized on the plasma membrane of the cells. While P392A showed a significant reduction (35-50%) in the efflux activity of mitoxantrone, BODIPY-prazosin, and Hoechst 33342, P485A exhibited a significant decrease of approximately 70% in the efflux activity of only BODIPY-prazosin. Other mutants had no significant changes in the efflux activities of these substrates. Drug resistance profiles of the cells expressing the mutants correlated well with the efflux data. ATPase activity was not substantially affected for P392A or P485A compared to that of wild-type BCRP. These results strongly suggest Pro(392) and Pro(485) are important in determining the overall transport activity and substrate selectivity of BCRP, respectively. Prazosin differentially affected the binding of 5D3, a conformation-sensitive antibody, to wild-type BCRP, P392A, or P485A in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, mitoxantrone had no significant effect on 5D3 binding. Homology modeling indicates that Pro(392) may play an important role in the communication between the MSD and NBD as it is predicted to be located at the interface between the two functional domains, and Pro(485) induces flexible hinges that may be essential for the broad substrate specificity of BCRP.
    Biochemistry 08/2011; 50(37):8057-66. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2) ) may be important mediators of asthma, but the specific sPLA(2) s involved in asthma are not known. Objective To evaluate sPLA(2) group IIA, V, and X proteins (sPLA(2) -IIA, sPLA(2) -V, and sPLA(2) -X) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, BAL cells, and airway epithelial cells of subjects with and without asthma, and examine the relationship between the levels of specific sPLA(2) enzymes and airway inflammation, asthma severity, and lung function. Methods The expression of sPLA(2) -IIA, sPLA(2) -V, and sPLA(2) -X in BAL cells and epithelial brushings was assessed by qPCR. The levels of these sPLA(2) proteins and sPLA(2) activity with and without group II and group X-specific inhibitors were measured in BAL fluid from 18 controls and 39 asthmatics. Results The airway epithelium expressed sPLA(2) -X at higher levels than either sPLA(2) -IIA or sPLA(2) -V, whereas BAL cells expressed sPLA(2) -IIA and sPLA(2) -X at similar levels. The majority of sPLA(2) activity in BAL fluid was attributed to either sPLA(2) -IIA or sPLA(2) -X. After 10-fold concentration of BAL fluid, the levels of sPLA(2) -X normalized to total protein were increased in asthma and were associated with lung function, the concentration of induced sputum neutrophils, and prostaglandin E(2) . The levels of sPLA(2) -IIA were elevated in asthma when normalized to total protein, but were not related to lung function, markers of airway inflammation or eicosanoid formation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance These data indicate that sPLA(2) -IIA and sPLA(2) -X are the major sPLA(2) s in human airways, and suggest a link between the levels of sPLA(2) -X in the airways and several features of asthma.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 01/2011; 41(6):801-10. · 4.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter that confers resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells by active efflux of the drugs from cells. P-gp also plays a key role in limiting oral absorption and brain penetration and in facilitating biliary and renal elimination of structurally diverse drugs. Thus, identification of drugs or new molecular entities to be P-gp substrates is of vital importance for predicting the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, or tissue levels of drugs or drug candidates. At present, publicly available, reliable in silico models predicting P-gp substrates are scarce. In this study, a support vector machine (SVM) method was developed to predict P-gp substrates and P-gp-substrate interactions, based on a training data set of 197 known P-gp substrates and non-substrates collected from the literature. We showed that the SVM method had a prediction accuracy of approximately 80% on an independent external validation data set of 32 compounds. A homology model of human P-gp based on the X-ray structure of mouse P-gp as a template has been constructed. We showed that molecular docking to the P-gp structures successfully predicted the geometry of P-gp-ligand complexes. Our SVM prediction and the molecular docking methods have been integrated into a free web server (http://pgp.althotas.com), which allows the users to predict whether a given compound is a P-gp substrate and how it binds to and interacts with P-gp. Utilization of such a web server may prove valuable for both rational drug design and screening.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(10):e25815. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) mediates efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. In this study, we investigated the role of polar residues within or near the predicted transmembrane α-helices 1 and 6 of BCRP in drug transport. We substituted Asn(387), Gln(398), Asn(629), and Thr(642) with Ala, Thr(402) with Ala and Arg, and Tyr(645) with Phe, and the mutants were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 or Flp-In-293 cells. Immunoblotting and confocal microscopy analysis revealed that all of the mutants were well expressed and predominantly targeted to the plasma membrane. While T402A and T402R showed a significant global reduction in the efflux of mitoxantrone, Hoechst 33342, and BODIPY-prazosin, N629A exhibited significantly increased efflux activities for all of the substrates. N387A and Q398A displayed significantly impaired efflux for mitoxantrone and Hoechst 33342, but not for BODIPY-prazosin. In contrast, T642A and Y645F showed a moderate reduction in Hoechst 33342 efflux only. Drug resistance profiles of human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing the mutants generally correlated with the efflux data. Furthermore, N629A was associated with a marked increase, and N387A and T402A with a significant reduction, in BCRP ATPase activity. Mutations of some of the polar residues may cause conformational changes, as manifested by the altered binding of the 5D3 antibody to BCRP in the presence of prazosin. The inward-facing homology model of BCRP indicated that Thr(402) within transmembrane 1 may be important for helical interactions, and Asn(629) may be involved in BCRP-substrate interaction. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the functional importance of some of these polar residues in BCRP activity.
    AJP Cell Physiology 11/2010; 299(5):C1100-9. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    Zhanglin Ni, Qingcheng Mao
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    ABSTRACT: Pregnant women are often complicated with diseases including viral or bacterial infections, epilepsy, hypertension, or pregnancy-induced conditions such as depression and gestational diabetes that require treatment with medication. In addition, substance abuse during pregnancy remains a major public health problem. Many drugs used by pregnant women are off label without the necessary dose, efficacy, and safety data required for rational dosing regimens of these drugs. Thus, a major concern arising from the widespread use of drugs by pregnant women is the transfer of drugs across the placental barrier, leading to potential toxicity to the developing fetus. Knowledge regarding the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, which play an important role in drug transfer across the placental barrier, is absolutely critical for optimizing the therapeutic strategy to treat the mother while protecting the fetus during pregnancy. Such transporters include P-glycoprotein (P-gp, gene symbol ABCB1), the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, gene symbol ABCG2), and the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs, gene symbol ABCCs). In this review, we summarize the current knowledge with respect to developmental expression and regulation, membrane localization, functional significance, and genetic polymorphisms of these ABC transporters in the placenta and their relevance to fetal drug exposure and toxicity.
    Current pharmaceutical biotechnology 11/2010; 12(4):674-85. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is the second member of the G subfamily of the large ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. BCRP was initially discovered in multidrug resistant breast cancer cell lines where it confers resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as mitoxantrone, topotecan and methotrexate by extruding these compounds out of the cell. BCRP is capable of transporting non-chemotherapy drugs and xenobiotiocs as well, including nitrofurantoin, prazosin, glyburide, and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine. BCRP is frequently detected at high levels in stem cells, likely providing xenobiotic protection. BCRP is also highly expressed in normal human tissues including the small intestine, liver, brain endothelium, and placenta. Therefore, BCRP has been increasingly recognized for its important role in the absorption, elimination, and tissue distribution of drugs and xenobiotics. At present, little is known about the transport mechanism of BCRP, particularly how it recognizes and transports a large number of structurally and chemically unrelated drugs and xenobiotics. Here, we review current knowledge of structure and function of this medically important ABC efflux drug transporter.
    Current Drug Metabolism 09/2010; 11(7):603-17. · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BCRP/ABCG2 mediates efflux of drugs and xenobiotics. BCRP was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified to > 90% homogeneity, and subjected to two-dimensional (2D) crystallization. The 2D crystals showed a p12(1) symmetry and projection maps were determined at 5 A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. Two crystal forms with and without mitoxantrone were observed with unit cell dimensions of a = 55.4 A, b = 81.4 A, gamma = 89.8 degrees , and a = 57.3 A, b = 88.0 A, gamma = 89.7 degrees , respectively. The projection map without mitoxantrone revealed an asymmetric structure with ring-shaped density features probably corresponding to a bundle of transmembrane alpha helices, and appeared more open and less symmetric than the map with mitroxantrone. The open and closed inward-facing forms of BCRP were generated by homology modeling, representing the substrate-free and substrate-bound conformations in the absence of nucleotide, respectively. These models are consistent with the experimentally observed conformational change upon substrate binding.
    Structure 03/2010; 18(4):482-93. · 5.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) mediates efflux of drugs and xenobiotics out of cells. In this study, we investigated the role of five basic residues within or near transmembrane (TM) 2 of BCRP in transport activity. Lys(452), Lys(453), His(457), Arg(465), and Lys(473) were replaced with Ala or Asp. K452A, K453D, H457A, R465A, and K473A were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and their plasma membrane expression and transport activities were examined. All of the mutants were expressed predominantly on the plasma membrane of HEK cells. After normalization to BCRP levels, the activities of K452A and H457A in effluxing mitoxantrone, boron-dipyrromethene-prazosin, and Hoechst33342 were increased approximately 2- to 6-fold compared with those of wild-type BCRP, whereas the activities of K453D and R465A were decreased by 40 to 60%. Likewise, K452A and H457A conferred increased resistance to mitoxantrone and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), and K453D and R465A exhibited lower resistance. The transport activities and drug-resistance profiles of K473A were not changed. These mutations also differentially affected BCRP ATPase activities with a 2- to 4-fold increase in V(max)/K(m) for K452A and H457A and a 40 to 70% decrease for K453D and R465A. These mutations may induce conformational changes as manifested by the altered binding of the 5D3 antibody to BCRP in the presence of prazosin and altered trypsin digestion. Molecular modeling and docking calculations indicated that His(457) and Arg(465) might be directly involved in substrate binding. In conclusion, we have identified several basic residues within or near TM2 that may be important for interaction of substrates with BCRP.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 03/2010; 333(3):670-81. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a half ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporter that plays an important role in drug resistance and disposition. Although BCRP is believed to function as a homodimer or homooligomer, this has not been demonstrated in vivo in intact cells. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated dimer/oligmer formation of BCRP in intact cells. Wild-type BCRP and the mutant C603A were attached to cyan or yellow fluorescence protein and expressed in HEK293 cells by transient transfection. Protein levels, cell surface expression, and efflux activities of wild-type and mutant BCRP were determined by immunoblotting, 5D3 antibody binding, and flow cytometric efflux assay, respectively. Dimer/oligomer formation of BCRP in intact cells was analyzed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. Wild-type BCRP and C603A were expressed in HEK293 cells at comparable levels. C603A was predominantly expressed in the plasma membrane as was wild-type protein. Furthermore, C603A retained the same mitoxantrone efflux activity and the ability of dimer/oligmer formation as wild-type BCRP. Finally, cross-linking experiments yielded data consistent with the FRET analysis. In conclusion, we have, for the first time, demonstrated that BCRP can form a dimer/oligomer in vivo in intact cells using the FRET technique. We have also shown that Cys(603) alone does not seem to be essential for dimer/oligomer formation of BCRP.
    International journal of biochemistry and molecular biology. 01/2010; 1(1):1-11.
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    ABSTRACT: A frequent manifestation of asthma, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), occurs in 30-50% of asthmatics and is characterized by increased release of inflammatory eicosanoids. The objective of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed in EIB and to understand the function of these genes in the biology of asthma. Genome-wide expression profiling of airway leukocytes and epithelial cells obtained by induced sputum was conducted in two groups of subjects with asthma with and without EIB (n = 7 per group), at baseline and following exercise challenge. Based on the results of the gene expression study, additional comparisons were made with a normal control group (n = 10). Localization studies were conducted on epithelial brushings and biopsies from an additional group of asthmatics with EIB (n = 3). Genes related to epithelial repair and mast cell infiltration including beta-tryptase and carboxypeptidase A3 were upregulated by exercise challenge in the asthma group with EIB. A gene novel to asthma pathogenesis, transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), was the most differentially expressed at baseline between the groups. In vivo studies confirmed the increased expression of TGM2 in airway cells and airway lining fluid, and demonstrate that TGM2 is avidly expressed in the asthmatic airway epithelium. In vitro studies using recombinant human enzymes reveal that TGM2 augments the enzymatic activity of secreted phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) group X (sPLA(2)-X), an enzyme recently implicated in asthma pathogenesis. This study found that TGM2, a mediator that is novel to asthma pathogenesis, is overexpressed in asthmatic airways and functions to increase sPLA(2)-X enzymatic activity. Since PLA(2) serves as the first rate-limiting step leading to eicosanoid formation, these results suggest that TGM2 may be a key initiator of the airway inflammatory cascade in asthma.
    PLoS ONE 01/2010; 5(1):e8583. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) mediates efflux of drugs and organic anions across the plasma membrane. Hydropathy analysis suggests that BCRP consists of a nucleotide-binding domain (residues approximately 1-395) and a membrane-spanning domain (MSD) (residues approximately 396-655); however, its exact topology structure remains unknown. In this study, we determined the topology structure of BCRP by inserting hemagglutinin (HA) tags in its predicted hydrophilic regions of the MSD. HA-tagged BCRP mutants were expressed in HEK cells and tested for their ability to efflux mitoxantrone and BODIPY-prazosin. Polarity of the inserted tags with respect to the plasma membrane was determined by immunofluorescence. All of the mutants were expressed at levels comparable to wild-type BCRP as revealed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against BCRP and the HA tag. Insertions at residues 423, 454, 462, 499, 529, 532, and 651 produced functional mutants, whereas insertions at residues 560, 594, and 623 resulted in mutants with significantly reduced activity and insertions at residues 387, 420, 474, and 502 completely abrogated the activity. HA tags inserted at residues 387, 474, 529, 532, 560, and 651 were localized intracellularly, whereas those inserted at residues 420, 423, 454, 499, 502, 594, and 623 revealed an extracellular location. Residue 462 was localized in a transmembrane (TM) segment. These results provide the first direct experimental evidence in support of a 6-TM model for BCRP with the amino and carboxyl termini of the MSD located intracellularly. These data may have important implications for understanding the transport mechanism of BCRP.
    Biochemistry 01/2009; 47(52):13778-87. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gastric epithelial cells liberate prostaglandin E(2) in response to cytokines as part of the process of healing of gastric lesions. Treatment of the rat gastric epithelial cell line RGM1 with transforming growth factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta leads to synergistic release of arachidonate and production of prostaglandin E(2). Results with highly specific and potent phospholipase A(2) inhibitors and with small interfering RNA show that cytosolic phospholipase A(2)-alpha and group IIA secreted phospholipase A(2) contribute to arachidonate release from cytokine-stimulated RGM1 cells. In the late phase of arachidonate release, group IIA secreted phospholipase A(2) is induced (detected at the mRNA and protein levels), and the action of cytosolic phospholipase A(2)-alpha is required for this induction. Results with RGM1 cells and group IIA secreted phospholipase A(2)-transfected HEK293 cells show that the group IIA phospholipase acts prior to externalization from the cells. RGM1 cells also express group XIIA secreted phospholipase A(2), but this enzyme is not regulated by cytokines nor does it contribute to arachidonate release. The other eight secreted phospholipases A(2) were not detected in RGM1 cells at the mRNA level. These results clearly show that cytosolic and group IIA secreted phospholipases A(2) work together to liberate arachidonate from RGM1 cell phospholipids in response to cytokines.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 07/2006; 281(24):16245-55. · 4.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

247 Citations
48.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Acheuron Hungary Ltd.
      Algyő, Csongrád, Hungary
  • 2010
    • The University of Manchester
      • Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre (MIB)
      Manchester, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2006–2009
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Pharmacy
      Seattle, WA, United States