Xiaofeng Bi

Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States

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Publications (7)18.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to obtain a reference point for early detection of tumors in individuals whose spouses were diagnosed with malignant tumors. Data from 230 husband and wife pairs with malignant tumors were collected and analyzed from the family history records of 15,000 people who came to the Department of Cancer Prevention, Cancer Institute/Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences for cancer screening between January 2009 and May 2012. The median diagnosis age was 67 years for husbands and 65 years for wives. A total of 214 cases (46.5 %) had digestive system malignancies. Respiratory system cancers were diagnosed in 64 husbands, of whom 20 (31.3 %) had spouses also with respiratory system cancer. Lung cancer ranked first for the females. The total number of lung cancer and commonly seen female-specific cancers (breast, ovarian, uterine, and cervical) was 127 (55.2 %). The difference in age at diagnosis between spouses was less than 10 years in 134 couples (58.3 %), while 77 (33.5 %) couples had an age difference less than 5 years. A family history of malignant tumors in first-degree relatives was documented in 48.3 % of the husbands and 48.7 % of the wives. The occurrence of cancer in both spouses of the couples studied resulted from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Nonhereditary factors such as diet, smoking, passive smoking, and air pollution also contributed to the development of cancers. It is recommended that when husband is diagnosed with cancer, the wife should be screened focusing on lung, breast, and gynecological cancers. If the wife was diagnosed with malignant disease, then screening for lung and digestive system cancers should be emphasized in the husband.
    Cell biochemistry and biophysics 04/2014; · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Thyroid cancers have increased dramatically over the past few decades. Comorbidities may be important and previous studies have indicated elevated secondary cancer risk after first thyroid cancer primary. This study examined the risk of secondary cancers after first thyroid cancer primary utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program database. Methods: The cohort consists of men and women diagnosed with first primary thyroid cancer reported to a SEER database in 1973-2008 (n=52,103). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated for all secondary cancers. Confidence intervals and P-values are at 0.05 significance alpha level and are two-sided based on Poisson exact methods. Results: In this cohort, there were 4,457 individuals who developed second primary cancers. The risk of developing second primary cancers after thyroid cancer primary varied from 10 to 150% depending on different cancer types. Cancers in all sites, breast, skin, prostate, kidney, brain, salivary gland, second thyroid, lymphoma, myeloma, and leukemia were elevated. The magnitude of the risk varied by histology, tumor size, calendar year of first primary diagnosis, and treatment plan of the first thyroid cancer primary. Second cancer risk was elevated for patients whose first primaries were small carcinomas or diagnosed after 1994 or received some form of radiation treatment. Conclusions: This large population-based analysis of second cancers among thyroid cancer patients suggests that there was an increase of second cancers in all sites, and the most commonly elevated secondary cancers were the salivary gland and kidney. Additionally, the increase in secondary cancers in patients with recently diagnosed microcarcinomas (< 10 mm) suggests that aggressive radiation treatment of the first primary, environment, and genetic susceptibility may increase risk of a second cancer.
    Thyroid: official journal of the American Thyroid Association 12/2012; · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in Th1 and Th2 cytokine genes may modify the association between blood transfusion and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Compared with women without blood transfusion, women with a history of transfusion had an increased risk of NHL if they carried IL10RA (rs9610) GG genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-3.2] or TNF (rs1800629) AG/AA genotypes (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.9-2.7). We also found women with a history of transfusion had a decreased risk of NHL if they carried IL10RA (rs9610) AG/AA genotypes (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) or TNF (rs1800629) GG genotype (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5-1.0). A similar pattern was also observed for B-cell lymphoma but not for T-cell lymphoma. Statistically significant interactions with blood transfusion were observed for IL10RA (rs9610) (P(forinteraction) = 0.003) and TNF (rs1800629) (P(forinteraction) = 0.012) for NHL overall and IL10RA (rs9610) (P(forinteraction) = 0.001) and TNF (rs1800629) (P(forinteraction) = 0.019) for B-cell lymphoma. The results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in TNF and IL10RA genes may modify the association between blood transfusion and NHL risk.
    American Journal of Hematology 04/2012; 87(8):766-9. · 4.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in DNA repair genes may modify the association between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). A population-based case-control study was conducted on Connecticut women including 518 histologically confirmed incident NHL cases and 597 controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios and effect modification from the 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 16 DNA repair genes of the association between solvent exposure and the risk of NHL overall and subtypes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in MGMT (rs12917) and NBS1 (rs1805794) significantly modified the association between exposure to chlorinated solvents and the risk of NHL (Pfor interaction=0.0003 and 0.0048, respectively). After stratification by major NHL histological subtypes, MGMT (rs12917) modified the association between chlorinated solvents and the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (Pfor interaction=0.0027) and follicular lymphoma (Pfor interaction=0.0024). A significant interaction was also observed between occupational exposure to benzene and BRCA2 (rs144848) for NHL overall (Pfor interaction=0.0042). Our study results suggest that genetic variations in DNA repair genes modify the association between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of NHL.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 03/2012; 21(6):580-584. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The introduction of new treatments for esophageal cancer including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or a combination of these modalities has not only improved patient survival, but may also increase the risk of the second primary cancers. The available evidence is conflicting with most risk estimates based on sparse numbers. Here we estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of second cancer among 24,557 esophageal cancer survivors (at least 2 months) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program between 1973 and 2007, who had been followed up for median 6.5 years (range 2 months-29.3 years). Second cancer risk was statistically significantly elevated (SIR = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI]= 1.25-1.42) among the survivors compared with the general population; the SIRs for cancers of oral and pharynx, stomach, small intestine, larynx, lung and bronchus, thyroid and prostate cancer were 8.64 (95% CI = 7.36-10.07), 2.87 (95% CI = 2.10-3.82), 3.80 (95% CI = 1.82-7.00), 3.19 (95% CI = 2.12-4.61), 1.68 (95% CI = 1.46-1.93), 2.50 (95% CI = 1.25-4.47), and 0.77 (95% CI = 0.65-0.90), respectively. Radiotherapy raised cancer risk of larynx (SIR = 3.98, 95% CI = 2.43-6.14) and thyroid (SIR = 3.57, 95% CI = 1.54-7.03) among all esophageal cancer survivors. For patients who had 5-9 years of follow up after radiotherapy, the SIR for lung cancer was 3.46 (95% CI = 2.41-4.82). Patients with esophageal cancer are at increased risks of second cancers of oral and pharynx, larynx, lung, and thyroid, while at a decreased risk for prostate cancer. These findings indicate that radiotherapy for esophageal cancer patients may increase risk of developing second cancers of larynx, lung, and thyroid. Thus, randomized clinical trials to address the association of radiotherapy and the risk of secondary cancer are warranted.
    Diseases of the Esophagus 11/2011; 25(6):505-11. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in Th1 and Th2 cytokine genes modify the relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Compared to women without a history of HRT use, women with a history of HRT use had a significantly decreased risk of NHL if they carried IFNGR2 (rs1059293) CT/TT genotypes (OR = 0.5, 95%CI: 0.3-0.9), IL13 (rs20541) GG genotype (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4-0.9), and IL13 (rs1295686) CC genotype (OR = 0.6, 95%CI: 0.4-0.8), but not among women who carried IFNGR2 CC, IL13 AG/AA, and IL13CT/TT genotypes. A similar pattern was also observed for B-cell lymphoma but not for T-cell lymphoma. A statistically significant interaction was observed for IFNGR2 (rs1059293 P(for interaction) = 0.024), IL13(rs20541 P(for interaction) = 0.005), IL13 (rs1295686 P(for interaction) = 0.008), and IL15RA (rs2296135 P(for interaction) = 0.049) for NHL overall; IL13 (rs20541 P(for interaction) = 0.0009), IL13(rs1295686 P(for interaction) = 0.0002), and IL15RA (rs2296135 P(for interaction) = 0.041) for B-cell lymphoma. The results suggest that common genetic variation in Th1/Th2 pathway genes may modify the association between HRT and NHL risk.
    Frontiers in Oncology 07/2011; 1(21).
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    ABSTRACT: Despite an increase in the number of molecular epidemiological studies conducted in recent years to evaluate the association between HPV infection and risk of breast carcinoma, the studies remain inconclusive. Here, a meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the prevalence of HPV in breast carcinoma and test the association. Studies on HPV DNA detection in sporadic breast carcinoma in female using polymerase chain reaction were included. Information on overall and type-specific (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45 and 51) HPV prevalence were required, plus detailed descriptions of study populations, HPV DNA source, publication calendar period and PCR primers used for HPV DNA detection and typing. We revealed that 24.49% of the breast carcinoma cases were associated with HPV, 32.42% occurred in Asia and 12.91% in Europe. The four most commonly identified HPV types, in the order of decreased prevalence, were HPV33, 18, 16, and 35. The detection of HPV was mostly influenced by publication calendar period and PCR primers used. In addition, the analysis of ten case-control studies containing 447 breast carcinoma cases and 275 controls showed a significant increase in breast carcinoma risk with HPV positivity (OR = 3.63, 95% CI = 1.42-9.27). These results suggest that it's difficult to rule out the possibility of the association of HPV and breast carcinoma at present according to available publication proofs.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 04/2011; 126(2):515-20. · 4.47 Impact Factor