William R. Post

West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, United States

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Publications (9)22.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: An accurate physical examination of patients with patellar instability is an important aspect of the diagnosis and treatment. While previous studies have assessed the diagnostic accuracy of such physical examination tests, little has been undertaken to assess the inter- and intra-tester reliability of such techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-tester reliability of the physical examination tests used for patients with patellar instability. Five patients (10 knees) with bilateral recurrent patellar instability were assessed by five members of the International Patellofemoral Study Group. Each surgeon assessed each patient twice using 18 reported physical examination tests. The inter- and intra-observer reliability was assessed using weighted Kappa statistics with 95% confidence intervals. The findings of the study suggested that there were very poor inter-observer reliability for the majority of the physical tests, with only the assessments of patellofemoral crepitus, foot arch position and the J-sign presenting with fair to moderate agreement respectively. The intra-observer reliability indicated largely moderate to substantial agreement between the first and second tests performed by each assessor, with the greatest agreement seen for the assessment of tibial torsion, popliteal angle and the Bassett's sign. For the common physical examination tests used in the management of patients with patellar instability inter-observer reliability is poor, while intra-observer reliability is moderate. Standardization of physical exam assessments and further study of these results among different clinicians and more divergent patient groups is indicated.
    The Knee 06/2011; 19(4):404-10. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 01/2009; · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The concept and need for a gender-specific or female-specific total knee prosthesis have generated interest and discussion in the orthopaedic community and the general public. This concept relies on the assumption of a need for such a design and the opinion that there are major anatomic differences between male and female knees. Most of the information regarding this subject has been disseminated through print and Internet advertisements, and through direct-to-patient television and magazine promotions. These sources and a recent article in a peer-reviewed journal, which support the need for a female-specific implant design, have proposed three gender-based anatomic differences: (1) an increased Q angle, (2) less prominence of the anterior medial and anterior lateral femoral condyles, and (3) reduced medial-lateral to anterior-posterior femoral condylar aspect ratio. We examined the peer-reviewed literature to determine whether women have had worse results than men after traditional TKAs. We found women have equal or better results than men. In addition, we reviewed the evidence presented to support these three anatomic differences. We conclude the first two proposed differences do not exist, and the third is so small that it likely has no clinical effect. Level of Evidence: Level IV, systematic review. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 10/2008; 466(12):3059-65. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this investigation was to determine current views regarding lateral release among experienced knee surgeons with a specific interest in the patellofemoral joint. Scientific survey. A questionnaire was developed and mailed to all members of an international group with a specific interest in disorders of the patellofemoral joint. Frequencies and percentages of responses were calculated for each question to determine surgeon consensus. We measured agreement among responses using the kappa statistic. This provided an indication of consistency for each question as well as correlation among the responses to different questions. The survey response rate was 60%. Isolated lateral release was estimated to account for only 1 to 5 surgical cases per respondent per year, or 2% of cases performed annually. In the setting of arthroscopy or exploration, 74% of respondents believed that lateral release calls for specific informed consent. Strong consensus was found that objective evidence is needed to justify lateral release, but agreement was poor as to what clinical evidence provides the most appropriate indication for the procedure. Even among experienced knee surgeons with a special interest in diseases of the patellofemoral articulation, isolated lateral release is rarely performed. Strong consensus was found that isolated lateral release should not be undertaken without prior planning in the form of objective clinical indications and preoperative informed consent. Level V.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 06/2004; 20(5):463-8. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    William R Post, Robert Teitge, Andrew Amis
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    ABSTRACT: A clear understanding of the pathophysiology of anterior knee pain is inhibited by the use of imprecise, poorly defined, and often interchanged words, such as malalignment, patellar alignment, maltracking, subluxation, dislocation, and congruence. The literature is filled with articles regarding the diagnosis, "malalignment of the patella," most of which give no precise diagnosis. This article presents a definition of malalignment and a plea for rational descriptive and scientific analysis. Much of what is described is based on theory, not facts. These ideas are supported by clinical experience and logical analysis, but very little in the way of scientific data. Most of the data involve radiographic images, which present only one piece of the puzzle.
    Clinics in Sports Medicine 08/2002; 21(3):521-46, x. · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • William R. Post, Stephen S. King
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: As the use of soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts, including hamstring grafts, has become more prominent and the benefits of aggressive rehabilitation have become clear, maximizing fixation with screw and spiked washers is important. Bicortical fixation may be superior. We were concerned about potential neurovascular risks and designed this study to define the posterior neurovasculature structures at risk when drilling for bicortical tibial screw fixation during ACL reconstruction. Type of Study: Consecutive sample. METHODS: We placed the tibial tunnel arthroscopically in 10 cadaveric knees using a standard tibial drill guide. Accurate tibial tunnel position was documented in each knee by lateral radiograph. A 4.5-mm bicortical drill hole was placed perpendicular to the tibial surface 1 cm distal to the tibial tunnel. The distances from the posterior tibial drill exit point to nearby neurovascular structures were measured with a caliper. RESULTS: The closest structure to the exit point was the bifurcation of the popliteal artery/vein (11.4 +/- 0.6 mm; range, 8.4 to 14.0 mm). The next closest was the anterior tibial vein (11.7 +/- 1.6 mm; range, 3.5 to 22.8 mm). The closest any individual hole came to a neurovascular structure was 3.5 mm from the anterior tibial vein. CONCLUSIONS: Bicortical drilling for fixation of soft tissue grafts appears reasonably safe. The structures at greatest risk for injury are the bifurcation of the popliteal artery/vein and the anterior tibial vein.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 04/2001; 17(3):244-247. · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • William R. Post
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate clinical evaluation of patients with patellofemoral disorders is the cornerstone of effective treatment. This article defines how a careful history and physical examination can direct strategies for nonoperative and operative management. A critical analysis of traditional methods of evaluation and a streamlined rational approach to clincial evaluation is presented. Key questions and important physical findings that affect treatment decisions are emphasized.Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, Vol 15, No 8 (November), 1999: pp 841–851
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 11/1999; 15(8):841-851. · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • W R Post
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate clinical evaluation of patients with patellofemoral disorders is the cornerstone of effective treatment. This article defines how a careful history and physical examination can direct strategies for nonoperative and operative management. A critical analysis of traditional methods of evaluation and a streamlined rational approach to clinical evaluation is presented. Key questions and important physical findings that affect treatment decisions are emphasized.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 01/1999; 15(8):841-51. · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • Danny H. Ford, William R. Post
    Clinics in Sports Medicine - CLIN SPORT MED. 01/1997; 16(1):29-49.