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Publications (2)17.84 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Many tumor cells express globally reduced levels of microRNAs (miRNA), suggesting that decreased miRNA expression in premalignant cells contributes to their tumorigenic phenotype. In support of this, Dicer, an RNase III-like enzyme that controls the maturation of miRNA, was recently shown to function as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in nonhematopoietic cells. Because the Myc oncoprotein, a critical inducer of B-cell lymphomas, was reported to suppress the expression of multiple miRNAs in lymphoma cells, it was presumed that a deficiency of Dicer and subsequent loss of miRNA maturation would accelerate Myc-induced lymphoma development. We report here that, surprisingly, a haploinsufficiency of Dicer in B cells failed to promote B-cell malignancy or accelerate Myc-induced B-cell lymphomagenesis in mice. Moreover, deletion of Dicer in B cells of CD19-cre(+)/Emicro-myc mice significantly inhibited lymphomagenesis, and all lymphomas that did arise in these mice lacked functional Cre expression and retained at least one functional Dicer allele. Uncharacteristically, the lymphomas that frequently developed in the CD19-cre(+)/Dicer(fl/fl)/Emicro-myc mice were of very early precursor B-cell origin, a stage of B-cell development prior to Cre expression. Therefore, loss of Dicer function was not advantageous for lymphomagenesis, but rather, Dicer ablation was strongly selected against during Myc-induced B-cell lymphoma development. Moreover, deletion of Dicer in established B-cell lymphomas resulted in apoptosis, revealing that Dicer is required for B-cell lymphoma survival. Thus, Dicer does not function as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in B cells and is required for B-cell lymphoma development and survival.
    Cancer Research 07/2010; 70(14):6083-92. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mdm2 binding protein (MTBP) has been implicated in cell-cycle arrest and the Mdm2/p53 tumor suppressor pathway through its interaction with Mdm2. To determine the function of MTBP in tumorigenesis and its potential role in the Mdm2/p53 pathway, we crossed Mtbp-deficient mice to Emu-myc transgenic mice, in which overexpression of the oncogene c-Myc induces B-cell lymphomas primarily through inactivation of the Mdm2/p53 pathway. We report that Myc-induced B-cell lymphoma development in Mtbp heterozygous mice was profoundly delayed. Surprisingly, reduced levels of Mtbp did not lead to an increase in B-cell apoptosis or affect Mdm2. Instead, an Mtbp deficiency inhibited Myc-induced proliferation and the upregulation of Myc target genes necessary for cell growth. Consistent with a role in proliferation, Mtbp expression was induced by Myc and other factors that promote cell-cycle progression and was elevated in lymphomas from humans and mice. Therefore, Mtbp functioned independent of Mdm2 and was a limiting factor for the proliferative and transforming functions of Myc. Thus, Mtbp is a previously unrecognized regulator of Myc-induced tumorigenesis.
    Oncogene 03/2010; 29(22):3287-96. · 8.56 Impact Factor