Shuichi Tanoue

Oita University, Ōita-shi, Oita-ken, Japan

Are you Shuichi Tanoue?

Claim your profile

Publications (63)136.49 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe the clinical utility of an imaging technique that combines 3D subtracted and unsubtracted rotational angiography for evaluation of the angioarchitecture of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs).
    Japanese journal of radiology 08/2014; · 0.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to investigate the variations in the uncal vein (UV) termination and its clinical implication in cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (CSDAVFs).
    Neuroradiology 05/2014; · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of transarterial sac embolization with a mixture of N-butyl cyanoacrylate and ethiodized oil (Lipiodol; Guerbet Japan, Tokyo, Japan) (NBCA-LPD) for type II endoleaks after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) using a double coaxial microcatheter technique. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of 20 consecutive cases of type II endoleaks treated by transarterial embolization using the technique from August 2010 to June 2013. The treatment indication was persistent type II endoleak over 6 months after EVAR associated with aneurysm expansion ≥ 5 mm in maximum diameter. A 1.9-F nontapered microcatheter was advanced to the aneurysmal sac through a 2.7-F microcatheter, which was coaxially introduced through a catheter. The endpoint of the procedure was intrasaccular filling with NBCA-LPD and occlusion of the feeder of the type II endoleak. The technical success rate was defined as success in transarterial intrasaccular approach followed by embolization of the intrasaccular channel and inflow arteries. Clinical success was defined as aneurysmal sac shrinkage or stabilization (freedom from sac expansion > 5 mm in maximum diameter). Results Technical success was achieved in 18 of 20 cases. During a mean follow-up period of 18.5 months, complete sac occlusion was observed in 13 cases (65%). Clinical success was achieved in 16 cases (80%). No serious complications were observed. Conclusions The transarterial intrasaccular approach with a double coaxial microcatheter technique can be successfully performed in most cases, and transarterial aneurysm sac embolization using NBCA-LPD has been proven to be feasible.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 01/2014; · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Recognition of shunted pouches dural arteriovenous fistula allows us to treat the disease effectively by selective embolization of the pouches at first. However, the shunted pouches in transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas have not been well-documented. Our aim was to evaluate the angioarchitecture of transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas, including the frequency and location of shunted pouches and their feeding arteries.MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-five consecutive cases of TSS-DAVFs that underwent rotational angiography and transvenous embolization between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed. Multiplanar reformatted images of rotational angiography and selective angiography were reviewed with a particular focus on the shunted pouches.RESULTS:All 25 cases showed SPs, with numbers ranging from 1 to 4 pouches (mean, 2.35). The SPs were located at the transverse-sigmoid junction in 16, close to the vein of Labbé in 9, at the dorsal-to-sigmoid sinus in 9, inferior to the sigmoid sinus in 6, at the sigmoid-jugular junction in 5, and inferior to the transverse sinus or the sinus confluence in 14. The SP at the sigmoid sinus was frequently fed by the jugular branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery and the stylomastoid artery. The SP at the transverse-sigmoid junction and the vein of Labbé was fed by the petrosal/petrosquamous and posterior branches of the middle meningeal artery and the transosseous branches of the occipital artery. The SP inferior to the transverse sinus and the sinus confluence was fed by the transosseous branches of the occipital artery and the posterior meningeal artery. All cases were successfully treated by transvenous embolization with sinus packing (n = 13) or selective embolization of the SP (n = 12).CONCLUSIONS:The presence of SP is a common angioarchitecture of TSS-DAVFs. Identification of the SPs would be useful for their treatment.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 03/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Comprehensive reports concerning selective embolization for arterial bleeding from third molar removal have not been published. We analyzed cases of arterial bleeding from third molar extraction that required transarterial embolization, and we demonstrate representative cases. METHODS: Five consecutive patients (three men and two women, aged 24 to 37 years) who underwent transarterial embolization at our institution were included in this study. Four of them showed postoperative bleeding after lower third molar removal, and one suffered bleeding after upper third molar extraction. The period of time from extraction to embolization varied from 5 h to 5 weeks. RESULTS: Angiography revealed pseudoaneurysms at the inferior alveolar artery in four cases and at the superior alveolar artery in one case. The pseudoaneurysms were selectively embolized using 25-33 % n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-lipiodol. All of the cases showed good results angiographically and clinically. Transit hypoesthesia at the region of the mental nerve was observed in one patient. CONCLUSION: Selective transarterial embolization is an effective technique for arterial bleeding from third molar removal when it is difficult to obtain hemostasis by dental procedures. Injection of NBCA can be useful when the alveolar artery is too small to embolize with coils.
    Neuroradiology 02/2013; · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this brief report is to compare unenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography with time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) with conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in assessing degree of saccular visceral artery aneurysm (VAA) occlusion after endosaccular packing with detachable coils. Eight patients with VAAs (five renal and three splenic artery aneurysms) were enrolled in this study. VAA occlusion rates based on Time-SLIP MR angiography were complete occlusion in four patients, neck remnants in three patients, and body filling in one patient. These findings corresponded with the DSA findings.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 02/2013; 24(2):289-293. · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Spinal ventral epidural arteriovenous fistulas (EDAVFs) are relatively rare spinal vascular lesions. We investigated the angioarchitecture of spinal ventral EDAVFs and show the results of endovascular treatment. METHODS: We reviewed six consecutive patients (four males and two females; mean age, 67.3 years) with spinal ventral EDAVFs treated at our institutions from May 2011 to October 2012. All patients presented with progressive myelopathy. The findings of angiography, including 3D/2D reformatted images, treatments, and outcomes, were investigated. A literature review focused on the angioarchitecture and treatment of spinal ventral EDAVFs is also presented. RESULTS: The EDAVFs were located in the ventral epidural space at the L1-L5 levels. All EDAVFs were supplied by the dorsal somatic branches from multiple segmental arteries. The ventral somatic branches and the radiculomeningeal arteries also supplied the AVFs in two patients. The AVFs drained via an epidural venous pouch into the perimedullary vein in four patients and into both the perimedullary vein and paravertebral veins in two patients. Four cases without paravertebral drainage were treated by transarterial embolization with diluted glue, and two cases with perimedullary and paravertebral drainages were treated by transvenous embolization alone or in combination with transarterial embolization. An angiographic cure was obtained in all patients. Clinical symptoms resolved in two patients, markedly improved in three patients, and minimally improved in one patient. CONCLUSION: In our limited experience, spinal ventral EDAVFs were primarily fed by somatic branches. EDAVFs can be successfully treated by endovascular techniques selected based on the drainage type of the AVF.
    Neuroradiology 01/2013; · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Most gastric varices arise at hepatofugal collateral pathways and drain into the systemic vein through one or both of two different types of portosystemic collateral drainage systems: the gastroesophageal (azygous) venous system and the gastrophrenic venous system. The gastroesophageal venous system consists of gastric varices contiguous with esophageal varices, paraesophageal varices, and the azygos vein, which terminates into the superior vena cava. Gastric varices draining through the gastroesophageal venous system can be treated with endoscopic techniques or creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The gastrophrenic venous system consists of the gastric varices and the left inferior phrenic vein (IPV), which terminates into the left renal vein or the inferior vena cava. The left IPV has abundant anastomoses with peridiaphragmatic and retroperitoneal veins, and these anastomoses can function as drainage pathways from gastric varices. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is a preferred treatment option for this type of gastric varix. Occasionally, gastric varices can form at the hepatopetal collateral pathway that develops secondary to localized portal hypertension caused by splenic vein occlusion. Splenectomy is often required for the treatment of this type of gastric varix. Multidetector computed tomography permits comprehensive evaluation of these venous drainage systems. Familiarity with and assessment of these draining routes of gastric varices are important for selecting treatment options and interventional techniques.
    Radiographics 01/2013; 33(1):87-100. · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) has become one of the most important for medical activity. While various CAD image become more exact, the larger amount of high-definition images are provided. Radiologists have to cost their time and efforts to investigate these medical images. It is strongly required to reduce their burden without debasing the quality of imaging diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a method to generate sound information based on the image features and discuss their sounds for diagnosis. Sonification technique helps for attention rousing and the fatigue reduction for medical imaging diagnosis.
    Complex, Intelligent, and Software Intensive Systems (CISIS), 2013 Seventh International Conference on; 01/2013
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of additional use of n-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for the treatment of complicated cases of gastroduodenal varices difficultly to treat by standard B-RTO technique. METHOD AND MATERIALS From June 2007 to December 2010, nine patients (4 males and 5 females; mean age 61 years)with gastroduodenal varices (gastric varices in 6 and duodenal varices in 3) were treated by BRTO with using NBCA alternative to ethanolamine oelate-iopamidole (EOI) due to insufficient stagnation of EOI in the varices . All BRTO procedures were using double coaxial balloon catheter system with a femoral venous approach. After placement of a microcatheter close to or into the varices, 5% EOI was injected into the varices under balloon occlusion of the drainage vein. ,When EOI could not be sufficiently filled or stagnated in the varices, we injected 20-30% NBCA-Lipiodol mixture liquid alternative to EOI. Following injection of NBCA, several microcoils were placed in the drainage veins to prevent potential risk of further migration of NBCA into the systemic veins. Technical success, degree of obliteration of varices on CT, follow-up endoscopic findings, and complications were analyzed. RESULTS Technical success was obtained in all patients. Amount of NBCA-Lipiodol mixture used was 1 to 2.5ml. CT performed 1 week after BRTO showed complete obliteration of the varices in 8 patients and partial obliteration in one. Follow-up gastroduodenoscopy was performed in 8 patients 1-24 months after B-RTO, and it showed disappearance of the varices in 3 and marked regression in 5 cases. No variceal bleeding was observed in all patients after BRTO. No major complication was observed in any of the patients. CONCLUSION Additional use of n-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO), is safe and effective technique for the treatment of complicated cases of gastroduodenal varices. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION This study shows the efficacy of BRTO using NBCA. In the cases that microcatheter can be advanced into the varices, this technique is safe and may be useful for shortening of balloon-occluded time.
    Radiological Society of North America 2012 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 11/2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo evaluate techniques and efficacy of retrograde transvenous obliteration for the treatment of duodenal varices associated with mesocaval collateral pathway.Materials and Methods Six consecutive cases of large/growing or ruptured duodenal varices treated by retrograde transvenous obliteration were retrospectively reviewed. Selective balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) with 5% ethanolamine oleate (EO) was performed in all cases. When EO could not be sufficiently stagnated in the varices, additional/alternative techniques were performed, including coil embolization of afferent vein or intravariceal injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). Clinical findings, anatomic features of duodenal varices, obliteration techniques, complications, posttherapeutic computed tomography (CT) findings, and follow-up endoscopic findings were investigated.ResultsAll duodenal varices were located at the second/third junction of the duodenum and were fed by single (n = 1) or multiple (n = 5) pancreaticoduodenal veins. One varix fed by a single afferent vein was successfully treated by simple selective B-RTO technique alone. The other five cases required coil embolization of afferent vein (n = 1) or intravariceal injection of NBCA (n = 4) because sclerosant was not sufficiently stagnated in the varices. CT 1 week after the procedure showed complete occlusion of the varices in all cases. A duodenal ulcer at the variceal site developed in one patient and was successfully treated by medication. Follow-up endoscopy showed disappearance of varices in all cases, and no recurrence was observed during follow-up.Conclusions Retrograde transvenous obliteration is an effective technique for the treatment of duodenal varices. However, additional/alternative techniques are required for successful treatment because of the complex anatomic features of duodenal varices.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 10/2012; 23(10):1339–1346. · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Normal hemodynamic features of the superior petrosal sinus and their relationships to the SPS drainage from cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas are not well known. We investigated normal hemodynamic features of the SPS on cerebral angiography as well as the frequency and types of the SPS drainage from CSDAVFs.MATERIALS AND METHODS:We evaluated 119 patients who underwent cerebral angiography by focusing on visualization and hemodynamic status of the SPS. We also reviewed selective angiography in 25 consecutive patients with CSDAVFs; we were especially interested in the presence of drainage routes through the SPS from CSDAVFs.RESULTS:In 119 patients (238 sides), the SPS was segmentally (anterior segment, 37 sides; posterior segment, 82 sides) or totally (116 sides) demonstrated. It was demonstrated on carotid angiography in 11 sides (4.6%), receiving blood from the basal vein of Rosenthal or sphenopetrosal sinus, and on vertebral angiography in 235 sides (98.7%), receiving blood from the petrosal vein. No SPSs were demonstrated with venous drainage from the cavernous sinus. SPS drainage was found in 7 of 25 patients (28%) with CSDAVFs. CSDAVFs drained through the anterior segment of SPS into the petrosal vein without draining to the posterior segment in 3 of 7 patients (12%).CONCLUSIONS:The SPS normally works as the drainage route receiving blood from the anterior cerebellar and brain stem venous systems. The variation of hemodynamic features would be related to the relatively lower frequency and 2 different types of SPS drainage from CSDAVFs.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 09/2012; · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 09/2012; 23(9):1245-6. · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) has become one of the most important for medical activity. The more exact and various CAD become, the larger amount of medical images are provided. Furthermore, these images become high definition. Radiologists have to cost their time and efforts to investigate these medical images. It is strongly required to reduce their burden without debasing the quality of imaging diagnosis. In this paper, we propose the technique to generate sound information based on the image features and discuss their sounds for diagnosis. Sonification technique helps for attention rousing and the fatigue reduction for medical imaging diagnosis.
    Complex, Intelligent and Software Intensive Systems (CISIS), 2012 Sixth International Conference on; 01/2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Six cases of gastric varices with multiple afferent veins, in which balloon-occluded venography of the draining vein showed insufficient filling of gastric varices with contrast medium, were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) and temporary balloon occlusion of the splenic artery. The gastric varices were completely filled with sclerosant in all but one patient. No procedure-related complications were encountered. Computed tomography (CT) after the procedure showed complete thrombosis of the varices in five patients and partial thrombosis in one patient. Temporary balloon occlusion of the splenic artery is a useful additional technique for complete obliteration of gastric varices in selected cases.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2011; 22(7):1045-8. · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • S Tanoue, H Kiyosue, Y Hori, T Abe, H Mori
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: For effective transvenous embolization of DAVFs, it is important to place coils at the shunting venous pouch in the initial step of the procedure. When it was difficult to navigate a microcatheter to the shunting venous pouch due to the anatomic relationship of approach routes with targeted pouches, we navigated the microcatheters by a "turn-back technique" within the involved sinuses into the target pouches. Complete occlusion or regression of the DAVF was obtained in all cases.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 05/2011; 33(6):E88-91. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of our study was to investigate the frequency and outcomes of partial thrombosis of gastric varices after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO). We reviewed retrospectively 69 consecutive patients with gastric varices who were followed-up for > 6 months after treatment with BRTO. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT and gastroscopy before and after BRTO. Imaging findings of gastric varices with particular attention to afferent veins, degree of thrombosis, and variceal changes were investigated. On the basis of pretherapeutic CT images, gastric varices were classified into two types: simple (< 3 afferent veins) and complex (≥ 3 afferent veins). Initial follow-up CT showed complete thrombosis in 58 patients (84%) and partial thrombosis in 11 (16%). Partial thrombosis was observed more frequently in complex-type varices (25% vs 9%). No regrowth or recurrent varices were observed in completely thrombosed varices. Follow-up endoscopy showed regrowth of gastric varices at 6-24 months after BRTO in five patients; all of these were complex-type and partially thrombosed varices. All five recurrent varices were treated successfully with repeated BRTO. Partial thrombosis after BRTO can occur in complex-type gastric varices, which have a higher risk of regrowth. Additional techniques that achieve complete thrombosis are required for long-term efficacy for complex-type gastric varices.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 03/2011; 196(3):686-91. · 2.90 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) has become one of the most important for medical activity. The more exact and various CAD become, the larger amount of medical images are provided. Furthermore, these images becomes high definition. Radiologists have to cost their time and efforts to investigate these medical images. It is strongly required to reduce their burden without debasing the quality of imaging diagnosis. In this paper, we propose the technique to generate sound information based on the image features and discuss their effects for diagnosis. Generating sound effects helps for attention rousing and the fatigue reduction for medical imaging diagnosis.
    2011 Third International Conference on Intelligent Networking and Collaborative Systems (INCoS), Fukuoka, Japan, November 30 - Dec. 2, 2011; 01/2011
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Haemophilus influenzae pulmonary infection. Thin-section CT scans obtained between January 2004 and March 2009 from 434 patients with acute H. influenzae pulmonary infection were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with concurrent infection diseases, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=76), Staphylococcus aureus (n=58) or multiple pathogens (n=89) were excluded from this study. Thus, our study group comprised 211 patients (106 men, 105 women; age range, 16-91 years, mean, 63.9 years). Underlying diseases included cardiac disease (n=35), pulmonary emphysema (n=23), post-operative status for malignancy (n=20) and bronchial asthma (n=15). Frequencies of CT patterns and disease distribution of parenchymal abnormalities, lymph node enlargement and pleural effusion were assessed by thin-section CT. The CT findings in patients with H. influenzae pulmonary infection consisted mainly of ground-glass opacity (n=185), bronchial wall thickening (n=181), centrilobular nodules (n=137) and consolidation (n=112). These abnormalities were predominantly seen in the peripheral lung parenchyma (n=108). Pleural effusion was found in 22 patients. Two patients had mediastinal lymph node enlargement. These findings in elderly patients with smoking habits or cardiac disease may be characteristic CT findings of H. influenzae pulmonary infection.
    The British journal of radiology 01/2011; 85(1010):121-6. · 2.11 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Moraxella catarrhalis is an important pathogen in the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute M. catarrhalis pulmonary infection. Thin-section CT scans obtained between January 2004 and March 2009 from 292 patients with acute M. catarrhalis pulmonary infection were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical and pulmonary CT findings in the patients were assessed. Patients with concurrent infection including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 72), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 61) or multiple pathogens were excluded from this study. The study group comprised 109 patients (66 male, 43 female; age range 28-102 years; mean age 74.9 years). Among the 109 patients, 34 had community-acquired and 75 had nosocomial infections. Underlying diseases included pulmonary emphysema (n = 74), cardiovascular disease (n = 44) or malignant disease (n = 41). Abnormal findings were seen on CT scans in all patients and included ground-glass opacity (n = 99), bronchial wall thickening (n = 85) and centrilobular nodules (n = 79). These abnormalities were predominantly seen in the peripheral lung parenchyma (n = 99). Pleural effusion was found in eight patients. No patients had mediastinal and/or hilar lymph node enlargement. M. catarrhalis pulmonary infection was observed in elderly patients, often in combination with pulmonary emphysema. CT manifestations of infection were mainly ground-glass opacity, bronchial wall thickening and centilobular nodules.
    The British journal of radiology 12/2010; 84(1008):1109-14. · 2.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

401 Citations
136.49 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2013
    • Oita University
      • • Department of Radiology
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
      Ōita-shi, Oita-ken, Japan
  • 2005
    • Kokura Memorial Hospital
      Kitakyūshū, Fukuoka, Japan