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Publications (5)0 Total impact

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    01/2001;
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    ABSTRACT: Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of NLM (National Library of Medicine) is in the process of developing a computerized patient record system for a clinical environment distributed in rural West Virginia. This realization of the CCN (Community Care Network), besides providing computer-based patient records accessible from a chain of clinics and one hospital, supports collaborative health care processes like referral and consulting. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system, a study was designed and is in the process of being executed. Three surveys were designed to provide subjective measures, and four experiments for collecting objective data. Data collection is taking place in several phases: baseline data are collected before the system is deployed; the process is repeated with minimal changes three, then six months later or as often as new versions of the system are installed. Results are then to be compared, using whenever possible matching techniques (i.e. the preliminary data collected on a provider will be matched with the data collected later on the same provider). Surveys are conducted through questionnaires distributed to providers and nurses and person-to-person interviews of the patients. The time spent on patient-chart related activities is measured by work-sampling, aided by a computer application running on a laptop PC. Information about missing patient record parts is collected by the providers, the frequency by which new features of the computerized system are used will be logged by the system itself and clinical outcome measures will be studied from the results of the clinics' own patient chart audits. Preliminary results of the surveys and plans for the immediate and distant future are discussed at the end of the paper.
    Proceedings / the ... Annual Symposium on Computer Application [sic] in Medical Care. Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care 02/1995;
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    ABSTRACT: Patient centred healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative and information-intensive process. It involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with different roles. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) developed a number of key technologies to enable collaborative processes. These technologies, integrated into an open collaborative environment, is currently being customized to create a research testbed, ARTEMIS, that addresses all aspects of patient-care life-cycle. ARTEMIS will equip each provider with his own personal assistant-a customized role-oriented workstation connected to his own information world through an information bus. With ARTEMIS, the users will be able to process multimedia patient-care information: look-up, compute, communicate, archive and collaborate
    Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, 1993. Proceedings., Second Workshop on; 05/1993
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    ABSTRACT: Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system.
    Proceedings / the ... Annual Symposium on Computer Application [sic] in Medical Care. Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care 02/1993;