Robert Wissman

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, United States

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Publications (10)23.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Pseudoaneurysms of the thyrocervical trunk or its branches are extremely rare. They are often the result of a penetrating injury and commonly iatrogenic in origin. Pseudoaneurysm formation following blunt trauma has twice been reported in the English-language literature. We report a case of a 56-year-old man involved in a motor vehicle collision who presented with a slowly growing mass over the course of 4 months. A magnetic resonance (MR) examination was requested to evaluate the cause of this slowly growing mass. Our case is unique in that MR imaging correctly diagnosed the lesion, which was subsequently treated with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection. Our case is the only published instance of treatment of a thyrocervical trunk pseudoaneurysm by direct ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection.
    Skeletal Radiology 04/2013; · 1.74 Impact Factor
  • Dale A Kimbrough, Kaushal Mehta, Robert D Wissman
    Seminars in roentgenology 04/2013; 48(2):108-10. · 0.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Hills-Sachs lesions are commonly associated with anterior shoulder dislocations and can be a source of recurrent instability. Studies have shown that, even after soft tissue repair of a Bankart lesion, there is still a risk for redislocation in a patient with significant bony defects. The purpose of this study is to ascertain whether balloon humeroplasty is an effective technique of reducing acute Hill-Sachs defect in a cadaveric model. METHODS: Eighteen cadaveric humerii dissected free of soft tissue were used for this study. Hill-Sachs lesions were created in a reproducible manner in the anatomical posterolateral aspect of the head with a mallet edge. An inflatable balloon tamp (balloon, IBT) was used to reduce the lesion via a small transcortical window. Cement was used to fill the void created by the balloon. We utilized computed tomography (CT) to collect volume data of each humeral head pre- and post-procedure. From this data, we calculated the volume of the Hill-Sachs defect and the percent corrected. A paired t test was performed to analyze the data statistically. RESULTS: The average prereduction Hill-Sachs defect volume was 1515.5 mm3. The average post-reduction lesion residual volume was 31 mm3 with 99.3% reduction to the original humeral head volume. The Hill-Sachs lesion reduction was statistically significant with P value of .0004. CONCLUSION: Balloon humeroplasty proved to be an effective technique for reducing Hill-Sachs lesions in a cadaveric model. This technique may be used as an adjunct to arthroscopic versus open Bankart procedure for engaging acute Hill-Sachs lesions.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 03/2013; · 1.93 Impact Factor
  • Jerrell Ingalls, Robert Wissman
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    ABSTRACT: Tarsal navicular stress fractures are injuries more commonly observed in athletes involved in sprinting and jumping sports. Known risk factors for the development of navicular stress fractures include pes cavus, metatarsus adductus, limited subtalar or ankle motion, medial narrowing of the talonavicular joint, as well as a short first metatarsal. The presence of an os supranaviculare has yet to be described as a predisposing factor in the occurrence of navicular stress fractures. We present two cases of navicular stress fractures in patients with an os supranaviculare and discuss possible reasons for such an association.
    Skeletal Radiology 07/2011; 40(7):937-41. · 1.74 Impact Factor
  • Daniel Stephen Hendry, Robert Wissman
    Radiology 01/2011; 258(1):320-2. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    Daniel Stephen Hendry, Robert Wissman
    Skeletal Radiology 11/2010; 40(3):345-6, 367-8. · 1.74 Impact Factor
  • Bhavya Rehani, Robert Wissman
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    ABSTRACT: Lead poisoning from gunshot wounds is unusual. Awareness of this rare but serious complication can guide the physician in making a prompt diagnosis. We present a case of a 30-year-old male who had a remote history of a gunshot wound in the right knee and presented with right knee pain. Plain film showed intrarticular invasion of the bullet fragments. He was also found to have microcytic anemia with high blood lead levels. Chelation therapy was immediately started, followed with surgical removal of the bullet fragments. Lead intoxication is a rare but fatal complication of gunshot wounds. After a timely diagnosis, chelation therapy should be immediately started.
    Southern medical journal 11/2010; 104(1):57-8. · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • Daniel Stephen Hendry, Robert Wissman
    Skeletal Radiology 11/2010; · 1.74 Impact Factor
  • Article: Case 165.
    Daniel Stephen Hendry, Robert Wissman
    Radiology 09/2010; 256(3):1005-6. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    Bhavya Rehani, Robert Wissman
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    ABSTRACT: Intraosseous lipoma is an uncommon entity that presents almost exclusively as a solitary lesion. Multiple intraosseous lipomas are exceedingly rare with only a few cases being reported in the literature. We present a case of 43-year-old African American female who presented with left leg and left wrist pain. The initial radiographs revealed well-defined radiolucent lesions in multiple bones involving the left wrist and the left lower limb. The magnetic resonance demonstrated multiple lesions, which showed high signal on the T1 and low signal on the fat suppressed T2 images. This favored the diagnosis of intraosseous lipomatosis that was confirmed by biopsy. Multiple intraosseous lipomatosis is an uncommon but important differential for multiple radiolucent lesions on the plain radiographs. This condition can lead to pathological fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging can aid in providing an accurate diagnosis. The awareness of this condition can help the clinician in guiding the correct diagnosis and management.
    Cases Journal 01/2009; 2:7399.