R-S Tan

National Heart Centre Singapore, Tumasik, Singapore

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Publications (2)9.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Nearly half of patients require cardiac surgery during the acute phase of infective endocarditis (IE). We describe the characteristics of patients according to the type of valve replacement (mechanical or biological), and examine whether the type of prosthesis was associated with in-hospital and 1-year mortality. Among 5591 patients included in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study, 1467 patients with definite IE were operated on during the active phase and had a biological (37%) or mechanical (63%) valve replacement. Patients who received bioprostheses were older (62 vs 54years), more often had a history of cancer (9% vs 6%), and had moderate or severe renal disease (9% vs 4%); proportion of health care-associated IE was higher (26% vs 17%); intracardiac abscesses were more frequent (30% vs 23%). In-hospital and 1-year death rates were higher in the bioprosthesis group, 20.5% vs 14.0% (p=0.0009) and 25.3% vs 16.6% (p<.0001), respectively. In multivariable analysis, mechanical prostheses were less commonly implanted in older patients (odds ratio: 0.64 for every 10years), and in patients with a history of cancer (0.72), but were more commonly implanted in mitral position (1.60). Bioprosthesis was independently associated with 1-year mortality (hazard ratio: 1.298). Patients with IE who receive a biological valve replacement have significant differences in clinical characteristics compared to patients who receive a mechanical prosthesis. Biological valve replacement is independently associated with a higher in-hospital and 1-year mortality, a result which is possibly related to patient characteristics rather than valve dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    International Journal of Cardiology 10/2014; 178C:117-123. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Referral bias occurs because of the clustering of patients at tertiary care centers. This may result in the distortion of observed clinical manifestations of rare diseases. This analysis evaluates the effect of referral bias on the epidemiology of infective endocarditis (IE) in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis-Prospective Cohort Study (ICE-PCS). This is a prospective multicenter cohort study comparing transferred and non-transferred patients with IE. Factors independently associated with transfer status were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. A total of 2,760 patients were included in the analysis, of which 1,164 (42.2%) were transferred from other medical centers. Transferred patients more often underwent surgery for IE (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-3.2). They were also more likely to have complications such as stroke (OR = 1.5; 95% CI 1.3-1.9), heart failure (OR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.6), and new valvular regurgitation (OR = 1.3; 95% CI 1.1-1.6). The in-hospital mortality rates were similar in both groups. Patients with IE who require surgery and suffer complications are referred to tertiary hospitals more frequently than patients with an uncomplicated course. Hospital transfer has no obvious effect on the in-hospital mortality. Referral bias should be taken into consideration when describing the clinical spectrum of IE.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 10/2010; 29(10):1203-10. · 3.02 Impact Factor