R. Bordoloi

The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States

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Publications (25)101.9 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Giant lobes of plasma extend 55 degrees above and below the Galactic Center, glowing in emission from gamma rays (the Fermi Bubbles) to microwaves (the WMAP haze) and polarized radio waves. We use ultraviolet absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope to constrain the velocity structure of the outflowing gas within these regions, targeting the quasar PDS 456 (Galactic coordinates l,b=10.4, +11.2 degrees). This sightline passes through a clear biconical structure seen in hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission near the base of the northern Fermi Bubble. We report two high-velocity metal absorption components, at v_LSR=-235 and +250 km/s, which cannot be explained by co-rotating gas in the Galactic disk or halo. Their velocities are suggestive of an origin on the front and back side of an expanding biconical outflow emanating from the Galactic Center. We develop simple kinematic biconical outflow models that can explain these observed profiles with an outflow velocity of ~900 km/s and a full opening angle of ~110 degrees (matching the X-ray bicone). This indicates Galactic Center activity over the last ~2.5-4.0 Myr, in line with age estimates of the Fermi Bubbles. The observations illustrate the use of UV absorption-line spectroscopy to probe the properties of swept-up gas venting into the Fermi Bubbles.
    12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report new observations of circumgalactic gas from the COS-Dwarfs survey, a systematic investigation of the gaseous halos around 43 low-mass z $\leq$ 0.1 galaxies using background QSOs observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. From the projected 1D and 2D distribution of C IV absorption, we find that C IV absorption is detected out to ~ 0.5 R$_{vir}$ of the host galaxies. The C IV absorption strength falls off radially as a power law and beyond 0.5 R$_{vir}$, no C IV absorption is detected above our sensitivity limit of ~ 50-100 m$\AA$. We find a tentative correlation between detected C IV absorption strength and star formation, paralleling the strong correlation seen in highly ionized oxygen for L~L* galaxies by the COS-Halos survey. The data imply a large carbon reservoir in the CGM of these galaxies, corresponding to a minimum carbon mass of $\gtrsim$ 1.2$\times 10^6$ $M_\odot$ out to ~ 110 kpc. This mass is comparable to the carbon mass in the ISM and more than the carbon mass currently in stars of these galaxies. The C IV absorption seen around these sub-L* galaxies can account for almost two-thirds of all $W_r$> 100 m$\AA$ C IV absorption detected at low z. Comparing the C IV covering fraction with hydrodynamical simulations, we find that an energy-driven wind model is consistent with the observations whereas a wind model of constant velocity fails to reproduce the CGM or the galaxy properties.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2014; 796(2). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the chronology of galactic bulge and disc formation by analysing the relative contributions of these components to the B-band rest-frame luminosity density at different epochs. We present the first estimate of the evolution of the fraction of rest-frame B-band light in galactic bulges and discs since redshift z~0.8. We performed a bulge-to-disc decomposition of HST/ACS images of 3266 galaxies in the zCOSMOS-bright survey with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.7 < z < 0.9. We find that the fraction of B-band light in bulges and discs is $(26 \pm 4)%$ and $(74 \pm 4)%$, respectively. When compared with rest-frame B-band measurements of galaxies in the local Universe in the same mass range ($10^{9} M_{\odot}\lessapprox M \lessapprox 10^{11.5} M_{\odot}$), we find that the B-band light in discs decreases by ~30% from z~0.7-0.9 to z~0, while the light from the bulge increases by ~30% over the same period of time. We interpret this evolution as the consequence of star formation and mass assembly processes, as well as morphological transformation, which gradually shift stars formed at half the age of the Universe from star-forming late-type/irregular galaxies toearlier types and ultimately into spheroids.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 03/2014; 564. · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We analyze the physical conditions of the cool (T ~ 10^4 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements taken along 38 quasar sightlines passing within 160 kpc of L ~ L* galaxies at z~0.2. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n_HII/n_H > 99%) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background (EUVB). Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R_vir, we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. This correlation has a power-law form of U = (0.006 +/- 0.003)(R/R_vir)^(0.8 +/- 0.3), with significant scatter. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n_ H = 10^(-4.2 +/- 0.25) (R/R_vir)^(-0.8 +/-0.3). Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, diffuse medium. Applying the ionization corrections to the HI column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M_ CGMcool > 6.5 x 10^10 M_sun for the volume within R < R_vir. Allowing for an additional warm, OVI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for *at least* half of the baryons purported to be missing from galaxy dark matter halos.
    The Astrophysical Journal 03/2014; 792(1). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: I will present the first results mapping the 2-D distribution of circumgalactic gas around nearby dwarf galaxies from the COS-Dwarfs survey. COS-Dwarfs survey uses HST/COS spectroscopy to probe the halos of low redshift galaxies with luminosities L = (0.02 - 0.3)L*, stellar masses (M* ) = 10(8-10) Msun, up to impact parameters of 150 kpc. Using sensitive UV absorption-line measurements of the multiphase gas diagnostics such as Lyα, CII/IV, Si II/III/IV I will present the radial and azimuthal distribution of such gas around these galaxies. I will also show how the absorption strengths vary with host galaxy color, mass, star formation rate, orientation, and how they compare with that of the L* galaxies probed by our related COS-Halos survey. In particular, I will present the dependence of CIV absorption on specific star formation rate (sSFR) and a total mass estimate for carbon around these dwarf galaxies.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We study the high-ionization phase and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium around low-redshift galaxies using a sample of 23 Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs) at 0.08<z<0.93 observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard HST. In Lehner et al. (2013), we recently showed that low-z LLSs have a bimodal metallicity distribution. Here we extend that analysis to search for differences between the high-ion and kinematic properties of the metal-poor and metal-rich branches. We find that metal-rich LLSs tend to show higher O VI columns and broader O VI profiles than metal-poor LLSs. The total H I line width (dv90 statistic) in LLSs is not correlated with metallicity, indicating that the H I kinematics alone cannot be used to distinguish inflow from outflow and gas recycling. Among the 17 LLSs with O VI detections, all but two show evidence of kinematic sub-structure, in the form of O VI-H I centroid offsets, multiple components, or both. Using various scenarios for how the metallicity in the high-ion and low-ion phases of each LLS compare, we constrain the ionized hydrogen column in the O VI phase to lie in the range log N(H II)~17.6-20. The O VI phase of LLSs is a substantial baryon reservoir, with M(high-ion)~10^{8.5-10.9}(r/150 kpc)^2 solar masses, similar to the mass in the low-ion phase. Accounting for the O VI phase approximately doubles the contribution of low-z LLSs to the cosmic baryon budget.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2013; 778(2). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of cool outflowing gas around galaxies, traced by MgII absorption lines in the co-added spectra of a sample of 486 zCOSMOS galaxies at 1 < z < 1.5. These galaxies span a range of stellar masses (9.45< log[M*/Msun]<10.7) and star formation rates (0.14 < log [SFR/Msun/yr] < 2.35). We identify the cool outflowing component in the MgII absorption and find that the equivalent width of the outflowing component increases with stellar mass. The outflow equivalent width also increases steadily with the increasing star formation rate of the galaxies. At similar stellar masses the blue galaxies exhibit a significantly higher outflow equivalent width as compared to red galaxies. The outflow equivalent width shows strong effect with star formation surface density ({\Sigma}SFR) of the sample. For the disk galaxies, the outflow equivalent width is higher for the face-on systems as compared to the edge-on ones, indicating that for the disk galaxies, the outflowing gas is primarily bipolar in geometry. Galaxies typically exhibit outflow velocities ranging from -200 km/s to -300 km/s and on average the face-on galaxies exhibit higher outflow velocity as compared to the edge-on ones. Galaxies with irregular morphologies exhibit outflow equivalent width as well as outflow velocities comparable to face on disk galaxies. These galaxies exhibit minimum mass outflow rates > 5-7 Msun/yr and a mass loading factor ({\eta} = dMout/dt /SFR) comparable to the star formation rates of the galaxies.
    07/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: A sample of 94 narrow line AGN with 0.65<z<1.20 has been selected from the 20k-Bright zCOSMOS galaxy sample by detection of the high-ionization [NeV]3426 line. Taking advantage of the large amount of data available in the COSMOS field, the properties of the [NeV]-selected Type-2 AGN have been investigated, focusing on their host galaxies, X-ray emission, and optical line flux ratios. Finally, the diagnostic developed by Gilli et al. (2010), based on the X-ray to [NeV] luminosity ratio, has been exploited to search for the more heavily obscured AGN. We found that [Ne v]-selected narrow line AGN have Seyfert 2-like optical spectra, although with emission line ratios diluted by a star-forming component. The ACS morphologies and stellar component in the optical spectra indicate a preference for our Type-2 AGN to be hosted in early-spirals with stellar masses greater than 10^(9.5-10)Msun, on average higher than those of the galaxy parent sample. The fraction of galaxies hosting [NeV]-selected obscured AGN increases with the stellar mass, reaching a maximum of about 3% at 2x10^11 Msun. A comparison with other selection techniques at z~1 shows that the detection of the [Ne v] line is an effective method to select AGN in the optical band, in particular the most heavily obscured ones, but can not provide by itself a complete census of AGN2. Finally, the high fraction of [NeV]-selected Type-2 AGN not detected in medium-deep Chandra observations (67%) is suggestive of the inclusion of Compton-thick sources in our sample. The presence of a population of heavily obscured AGN is corroborated by the X-ray to [NeV] ratio; we estimated, by mean of X-ray stacking technique and simulations, that the Compton-thick fraction in our sample of Type-2 AGN is 43+-4%, in good agreement with standard assumptions by the XRB synthesis models.
    05/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and morphological properties for differently selected samples of passive galaxies up to z=1 extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k spectroscopic survey. This analysis intends to explore the dependence of galaxy properties on the selection criterion adopted, study the degree of contamination due to star-forming outliers, and provide a comparison between different commonly used selection criteria. We extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k catalog six different samples of passive galaxies, based on morphology, optical colors, specific star-formation rate, a best fit to the observed spectral energy distribution, and a criterion that combines morphological, spectroscopic, and photometric information. The morphological sample has the higher percentage of contamination in colors, specific star formation rate and presence of emission lines, while the red & passive ETGs sample is the purest, with properties mostly compatible with no star formation activity; however, it is also the less economic criterion in terms of information used. The best performing among the other criteria are the red SED and the quiescent ones, providing a percentage of contamination only slightly higher than the red & passive ETGs criterion (on average of a factor of ~2) but with absolute values of the properties of contaminants still compatible with a red, passively evolving population. We also provided two revised definitions of early type galaxies based on restframe color-color and color-mass criteria, that better reproduce the observed bimodalities. The analysis of the number densities shows evidences of mass-assembly downsizing, with galaxies at 10.25<log(M/Msun)<10.75 increasing their number by a factor ~2-4 from z=0.6 to z=0.2, by a factor ~2-3 from z=1 to z=0.2 at 10.75<log(M/Msun)<11, and by only ~10-50% from z=1 to z=0.2 at 11<log(M/Msun)<11.5.
    05/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are thought to play an important role in galaxy evolution. It has been suggested that AGN feedback could be partly responsible for quenching star-formation in the hosts, leading to transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The transition seems to occur faster for the most massive galaxies, where traces of AGN activity have been already found as early as at z<0.1. The correlation between AGN activity, aging of the stellar populations and stellar mass still needs to be fully understood, especially at high redshifts. Our aim is to investigate the link between AGN activity, star-formation, and stellar mass of the host galaxy at 0<z<1, looking for spectroscopic traces of AGN and aging of the host. This work provides an extension of the existing studies at z<0.1 and contributes to shed light on galaxy evolution at intermediate redshifts. We used the zCOSMOS 20k data to create a sample of galaxies at z<1. We divided the sample into several mass-redshift bins to obtain stacked galaxy spectra with an improved signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We exploited emission-line diagnostic diagrams to separate AGN from star-forming galaxies. We found an indication of a role for the total galaxy stellar mass in leading galaxy classification. Stacked spectra show AGN signatures above the log(M_*/M_Sun)>10.2 threshold. Moreover, the stellar populations of AGN hosts are found to be older than star-forming and composite galaxies. This could be due to the the tendency of AGN to reside in massive hosts. The dependence of the AGN classification on the stellar mass agrees with what has been found in previous research. Together with the evidence of older stellar populations inhabiting the AGN-like galaxies, it is consistent with the downsizing scenario. In particular, our evidence points to an evolutionary scenario where the AGN-feedback is capable of quenching the star formation in the most massive galaxies. Therefore, the AGN-feedback is the best candidate for initiating the passive evolutionary phase of galaxies.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 02/2013; · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the red fraction of central and satellite galaxies in the large zCOSMOS group catalog out to z ~ 0.8 correcting for both the incompleteness in stellar mass and for the less than perfect purities of the central and satellite samples. We show that, at all masses and at all redshifts, the fraction of satellite galaxies that have been quenched, i.e., are red, is systematically higher than that of centrals, as seen locally in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The satellite quenching efficiency, which is the probability that a satellite is quenched because it is a satellite rather than a central, is, as locally, independent of stellar mass. Furthermore, the average value is about 0.5, which is also very similar to that seen in the SDSS. We also construct the mass functions of blue and red centrals and satellites and show that these broadly follow the predictions of the Peng et al. analysis of the SDSS groups. Together, these results indicate that the effect of the group environment in quenching satellite galaxies was very similar when the universe was about a half its present age, as it is today.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2012; 769(1). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present joint constraints on the distribution of MgII absorption around galaxies, by combining the MgII absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of host galaxies of strong MgII systems from the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that predict, the dependence of MgII absorption on a galaxy's apparent inclination, impact parameter(b) and azimuthal angle. The variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the MgII absorption than the dependence on the galaxy's inclination. Strong MgII absorbers (W_r(2796)>0.3) are asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies:72% of the absorbers studied and 100% of the close-in absorbers within b<38 kpc, are located within 50deg of the host galaxy's projected minor axis. Composite models consisting either of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the datasets. Simultaneously fitting both datasets to the composite model, bipolar cone is confined to 50deg of the minor axis and contains 2/3 of the total MgII absorption. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with azimuth with an exponential scale-length in opening angle of 45deg. We conclude that the distribution of MgII gas at low impact parameters is not the same as that found at high impact parameters. MgII absorption within 40 kpc primarily arises from cool MgII gas entrained in winds. Beyond 40 kpc, there is evidence for a more symmetric distribution, significantly different from that closer into the galaxies. Here a significant component appears aligned more with the disk and is possibly inflowing, perhaps as part of a galactic fountain or the inflow of material from further out in the system.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2012; · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We identify 42 candidate groups lying between 1.8<z<3.0 from a sample of 3502 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the zCOSMOS-deep redshift survey within the same redshift interval. These systems contain three to five spectroscopic galaxies that lie within 500kpc in projected distance (in physical space) and within 700km/s in velocity. Based on extensive analysis of mock catalogues that have been generated from the Millennium simulation, we examine the likely nature of these systems at the time of observation, and what they will evolve into down to the present epoch. Although few of the "member" galaxies are likely to reside in the same halo at the epoch we observe them, 50% of the systems will eventually bring them all into the same halo, and almost all (93%) will have at least part of the member galaxies in the same halo by the present epoch. Most of the candidate groups can therefore be described as "proto-groups". An estimate of the overdensities is also consistent with the idea that these systems are being seen at the start of the assembly process. We also examine present-day haloes and ask whether their progenitors would have been seen amongst our candidate groups. For present-day haloes between 10^14-10^15Msun/h, 35% should have appeared amongst our candidate groups, and this would have risen to 70% if our survey had been fully-sampled, so we can conclude that our sample can be taken as representative of a large fraction of such systems. There is a clear excess of massive galaxies above 10^10Msun around the locations of the candidate groups in a large independent COSMOS photo-z sample, but we see no evidence in this latter data for any colour differentiation with respect to the field. This is however consistent with the idea that such differentiation arises in satellite galaxies, as indicated at z<1, if the candidate groups are indeed only starting to be assembled.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2012; 765(2). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an optical group catalog between 0.1 < z < 1 based on 16,500 high-quality spectroscopic redshifts in the completed zCOSMOS-bright survey. The catalog published herein contains 1498 groups in total and 192 groups with more than five observed members. The catalog includes both group properties and the identification of the member galaxies. Based on mock catalogs, the completeness and purity of groups with three and more members should be both about 83% with respect to all groups that should have been detectable within the survey, and more than 75% of the groups should exhibit a one-to-one correspondence to the "real" groups. Particularly at high redshift, there are apparently more galaxies in groups in the COSMOS field than expected from mock catalogs. We detect clear evidence for the growth of cosmic structure over the last seven billion years in the sense that the fraction of galaxies that are found in groups (in volume-limited samples) increases significantly with cosmic time. In the second part of the paper, we develop a method for associating galaxies that only have photo-z to our spectroscopically identified groups. We show that this leads to improved definition of group centers, improved identification of the most massive galaxies in the groups, and improved identification of central and satellite galaxies, where we define the former to be galaxies at the minimum of the gravitational potential wells. Subsamples of centrals and satellites in the groups can be defined with purities up to 80%, while a straight binary classification of all group and non-group galaxies into centrals and satellites achieves purities of 85% and 75%, respectively, for the spectroscopic sample.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2012; 753(2). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a group-galaxy cross-correlation analysis using a group catalog produced from the 16,500 spectra from the optical zCOSMOS galaxy survey. Our aim is to perform a consistency test in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.8 between the clustering strength of the groups and mass estimates that are based on the richness of the groups. We measure the linear bias of the groups by means of a group-galaxy cross-correlation analysis and convert it into mass using the bias-mass relation for a given cosmology, checking the systematic errors using realistic group and galaxy mock catalogs. The measured bias for the zCOSMOS groups increases with group richness as expected by the theory of cosmic structure formation and yields masses that are reasonably consistent with the masses estimated from the richness directly, considering the scatter that is obtained from the 24 mock catalogs. An exception are the richest groups at high redshift (estimated to be more massive than 10^13.5 M_sun), for which the measured bias is significantly larger than for any of the 24 mock catalogs (corresponding to a 3-sigma effect), which is attributed to the extremely large structure that is present in the COSMOS field at z ~ 0.7. Our results are in general agreement with previous studies that reported unusually strong clustering in the COSMOS field.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2012; 755(1). · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The COSMOS field has been the subject of a wide range of observations, with a number of studies focusing on reconstructing the 3D dark matter density field. Typically, these studies have focused on one given method or tracer. In this paper, we reconstruct the distribution of mass in the COSMOS field out to a redshift z=1 by combining Hubble Space Telescope weak lensing measurements with zCOSMOS spectroscopic measurements of galaxy clustering. The distribution of galaxies traces the distribution of mass with high resolution (particularly in redshift, which is not possible with lensing), and the lensing data empirically calibrates the mass normalisation (bypassing the need for theoretical models). Two steps are needed to convert a galaxy survey into a density field. The first step is to create a smooth field from the galaxy positions, which is a point field. We investigate four possible methods for this: (i) Gaussian smoothing, (ii) convolution with truncated isothermal sphere, (iii) fifth nearest neighbour smoothing and (iv) a muliti-scale entropy method. The second step is to rescale this density field using a bias prescription. We calculate the optimal bias scaling for each method by comparing predictions from the smoothed density field with the measured weak lensing data, on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis. In general, we find scale-independent bias for all the smoothing schemes, to a precision of 10%. For the nearest neighbour smoothing case, we find the bias to be 2.51\pm 0.25. We also find evidence for a strongly evolving bias, increasing by a factor of ~3.5 between redshifts 0<z<0.8. We believe this strong evolution can be explained by the fact that we use a flux limited sample to build the density field.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 05/2012; 424(1). · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we measure the merger fraction and rate, both minor and major, of massive early-type galaxies (M_star >= 10^11 M_Sun) in the COSMOS field, and study their role in mass and size evolution. We use the 30-band photometric catalogue in COSMOS, complemented with the spectroscopy of the zCOSMOS survey, to define close pairs with a separation 10h^-1 kpc <= r_p <= 30h-1 kpc and a relative velocity Delta v <= 500 km s^-1. We measure both major (stellar mass ratio mu = M_star,2/M_star,1 >= 1/4) and minor (1/10 <= mu < 1/4) merger fractions of massive galaxies, and study their dependence on redshift and on morphology. The merger fraction and rate of massive galaxies evolves as a power-law (1+z)^n, with major mergers increasing with redshift, n_MM = 1.4, and minor mergers showing little evolution, n_mm ~ 0. When split by their morphology, the minor merger fraction for early types is higher by a factor of three than that for spirals, and both are nearly constant with redshift. Our results show that massive early-type galaxies have undergone 0.89 mergers (0.43 major and 0.46 minor) since z ~ 1, leading to a mass growth of ~30%. We find that mu >= 1/10 mergers can explain ~55% of the observed size evolution of these galaxies since z ~ 1. Another ~20% is due to the progenitor bias (younger galaxies are more extended) and we estimate that very minor mergers (mu < 1/10) could contribute with an extra ~20%. The remaining ~5% should come from other processes (e.g., adiabatic expansion or observational effects). This picture also reproduces the mass growth and velocity dispersion evolution of these galaxies. We conclude from these results that merging is the main contributor to the size evolution of massive ETGs at z <= 1, accounting for ~50-75% of that evolution in the last 8 Gyr. Nearly half of the evolution due to mergers is related to minor (mu < 1/4) events.
    02/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We present new improved constraints on the Hubble parameter H(z) in the redshift range 0.15 < z < 1.1, obtained from the differential spectroscopic evolution of early-type galaxies as a function of redshift. We extract a large sample of early-type galaxies (\sim11000) from several spectroscopic surveys, spanning almost 8 billion years of cosmic lookback time (0.15 < z < 1.42). We select the most massive, red elliptical galaxies, passively evolving and without signature of ongoing star formation. Those galaxies can be used as standard cosmic chronometers, as firstly proposed by Jimenez & Loeb (2002), whose differential age evolution as a function of cosmic time directly probes H(z). We analyze the 4000 {\AA} break (D4000) as a function of redshift, use stellar population synthesis models to theoretically calibrate the dependence of the differential age evolution on the differential D4000, and estimate the Hubble parameter taking into account both statistical and systematical errors. We provide 8 new measurements of H(z) (see Tab. 4), and determine its change in H(z) to a precision of 5-12% mapping homogeneously the redshift range up to z \sim 1.1; for the first time, we place a constraint on H(z) at z \neq 0 with a precision comparable with the one achieved for the Hubble constant (about 5-6% at z \sim 0.2), and covered a redshift range (0.5 < z < 0.8) which is crucial to distinguish many different quintessence cosmologies. These measurements have been tested to best match a \Lambda CDM model, clearly providing a statistically robust indication that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. This method shows the potentiality to open a new avenue in constrain a variety of alternative cosmologies, especially when future surveys (e.g. Euclid) will open the possibility to extend it up to z \sim 2.
    Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics 01/2012; 2012(08). · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using the group catalog obtained from zCOSMOS spectroscopic data and the complementary photometric data from the COSMOS survey, we explore segregation effects occurring in groups of galaxies at intermediate/high redshifts. We built two composite groups at intermediate (0.2 <= z <= 0.45) and high (0.45 < z <= 0.8) redshifts, and we divided the corresponding composite group galaxies into three samples according to their distance from the group center. We explored how galaxy stellar masses and colors - working in narrow bins of stellar masses - vary as a function of the galaxy distance from the group center. We found that the most massive galaxies in our sample (Log(M_gal/M_sun) >= 10.6) do not display any strong group-centric dependence of the fractions of red/blue objects. For galaxies of lower masses (9.8 <= Log(M_gal/M_sun) <= 10.6) there is a radial dependence in the changing mix of red and blue galaxies. This dependence is most evident in poor groups, whereas richer groups do not display any obvious trend of the blue fraction. Interestingly, mass segregation shows the opposite behavior: it is visible only in rich groups, while poorer groups have a a constant mix of galaxy stellar masses as a function of radius. We suggest a simple scenario where color- and mass-segregation originate from different physical processes. While dynamical friction is the obvious cause for establishing mass segregation, both starvation and galaxy-galaxy collisions are plausible mechanisms to quench star formation in groups at a faster rate than in the field. In poorer groups the environmental effects are caught in action superimposed to secular galaxy evolution. Their member galaxies display increasing blue fractions when moving from the group center to more external regions, presumably reflecting the recent accretion history of these groups.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: The success of future large scale weak lensing surveys will critically depend on the accurate estimation of photometric redshifts of very large samples of galaxies. This in turn depends on both the quality of the photometric data and the photo-z estimators. In a previous study, (Bordoloi et al. 2010) we focussed primarily on the impact of photometric quality on photo-z estimates and on the development of novel techniques to construct the N(z) of tomographic bins at the high level of precision required for precision cosmology, as well as the correction of issues such as imprecise corrections for Galactic reddening. We used the same set of templates to generate the simulated photometry as were then used in the photo-z code, thereby removing any effects of "template error". In this work we now include the effects of "template error" by generating simulated photometric data set from actual COSMOS photometry. We use the trick of simulating redder photometry of galaxies at higher redshifts by using a bluer set of passbands on low z galaxies with known redshifts. We find that "template error" is a rather small factor in photo-z performance, at the photometric precision and filter complement expected for all-sky surveys. With only a small sub-set of training galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, it is in principle possible to construct tomographic redshift bins whose mean redshift is known, from photo-z alone, to the required accuracy of 0.002(1+z).
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2012; 421(2). · 5.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

53 Citations
101.90 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Astronomy
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 2012
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • Institut de recherche en astrophysique et planétologie (IRAP)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Instituto De Astrofisica De Andalucia
      Granata, Andalusia, Spain
  • 2011–2012
    • The Astronomical Observatory of Brera
      Merate, Lombardy, Italy