Pierre Langevin

New York State, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (8)26.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We identified two large French-Canadian families segregating a familial partial epilepsy syndrome with variable foci (FPEVF) characterized by mostly nocturnal seizures arising from frontal, temporal, and occasionally occipital epileptic foci. There is no evidence for structural brain damage or permanent neurological dysfunction. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance. We mapped the disease locus to a 3.8-cM interval on chromosome 22q11-q12, between markers D22S1144 and D22S685. Using the most conservative diagnostic scheme, the maximum cumulative LOD score was 6.53 at recombination fraction (θ) 0 with D22S689. The LOD score in the larger family was 5.34 at θ=0 with the same marker. The two families share an identical linked haplotype for ⩾10 cM, including the candidate interval, indicating a recent founder effect. A severe phenotype in one of the probands may be caused by homozygosity for the causative mutation, as suggested by extensive homozygosity for the linked haplotype and a bilineal family history of epilepsy. An Australian family with a similar phenotype was not found to link to chromosome 22, indicating genetic heterogeneity of FPEVF.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 12/1999; 38(6). DOI:10.1086/302649 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral dysgenesis is a subject of interest because of its relationship to cerebral development and dysfunction and to epilepsy. The authors present a detailed study of a 16-year-old boy who underwent surgery for a severe seizure disorder. This patient had dysgenesis of the right hemisphere, which was composed of a giant central frontoparietal nodular gray matter heterotopia with overlying large islands of cortical dysplasia around a displaced central fissure. Exceptional insight into the function, biochemistry, electrophysiology, and histological structure of this lesion was obtained from neurological studies that revealed complementary information: magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, [18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (PET), functional PET scanning, proton MR spectroscopic (1H-MRS) imaging, intraoperative cortical mapping and electrocorticography, in vitro electrophysiology, and immunocytochemistry. These studies demonstrated compensatory cortical reorganization and showed that large areas of heterotopia and cortical dysplasia in the central area may retain normal motor and sensory function despite strikingly altered cytoarchitectonic organization and neuronal metabolism. Such lesions necessitate appropriate functional imaging studies prior to surgery and cortical mapping to avoid creating neurological deficits. Integrated studies, such as PET, 1H-MRS imaging, cortical mapping, immunocytochemistry, and electrophysiology may provide information on the function of developmental disorders of cerebral organization.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 08/1997; 87(1):113-21. DOI:10.3171/jns.1997.87.1.0113 · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • 01/1994: pages 31-38; Plenum Press.
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    ABSTRACT: Centrifugal migration of newly generated neuroblasts toward the cortical surface can be arrested at different levels, resulting in anatomically different disorders. This is illustrated by three patients with diffuse or generalized neuronal migration disorders (NMDs): pachygyria, subcortical laminar heterotopia ('double-cortex' syndrome), and periventricular laminar heterotopia. All had medically intractable partial and generalized epileptic seizures, but there was no close correlation between the type of dysplasia and intelligence or clinical pattern. The low intelligence found in these patients may relate to the epileptic syndrome, rather than to the NMDs alone. MRI suggested that in this spectrum of disorders the migration process was arrested at different stages, depending on the extent, timing and site of damage to radial glial fibres.
    Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology 05/1993; 35(4):331-9. DOI:10.1111/j.1469-8749.1993.tb11645.x · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 1971, Andermann and Andermann described an autosomal recessive syndrome found within the Charlevoix and the Saguenay populations (Quebec, Canada) characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) associated with motor and sensory neuropathy, mental retardation and dysmorphic features. A study of CT in 64 patients demonstrated a total ACC in 37 cases (57.8%), partial ACC in 6 cases (9.4%) and the presence of the corpus callosum in 21 cases (32.8%). The latter was confirmed by MRI in 3 cases. CT of patients without ACC revealed a high frequency of developmental or degenerative midline anomalies, particularly interhemispheric fissure enlargement and posterior fossa atrophy. The clinical presentation and the natural course of the neuropathy, the intellectual impairment and the behavioural manifestations are identical amongst individuals with or without ACC. Individuals with or without ACC are found within the same family and often within the same sibship. These observations support the hypothesis of a single genetic syndrome in which the constant manifestation is the motor and sensory neuropathy.
    The Canadian journal of neurological sciences. Le journal canadien des sciences neurologiques 06/1990; 17(2):103-8. · 1.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 1971, Andermann and Andermann described an autosomal recessive syndrome found within the Charlevoix and the Saguenay populations (Quebec, Canada) characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) associated with motor and sensory neuropathy, mental retardation and dysmorphic features. A study of CT in 64 patients demonstrated a total ACC in 37 cases (57.8%), partial ACC in 6 cases (9.4%) and the presence of the corpus callosum in 21 cases (32.8%). The latter was confirmed by MRI in 3 cases. CT of patients without ACC revealed a high frequency of developmental or degenerative midline anomalies, particularly interhemispheric fissure enlargement and posterior fossa atrophy. The clinical presentation and the natural course of the neuropathy, the intellectual impairment and the behavioural manifestations are identical amongst individuals with or without ACC. Individuals with or without ACC are found within the same family and often within the same sibship. These observations support the hypothesis of a single genetic syndrome in which the constant manifestation is the motor and sensory neuropathy.
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    ABSTRACT: Unilateral or bilateral rolandic macrogyria has been described as a cause of epilepsy and, in some cases, retardation. Tissue from the periphery of these lesions shows the changes of focal cortical dysplasia. Evidence reported herein suggests that cortical dysplasia may also be generalized. Two patients with intractable epilepsy and mental retardation had diffusely abnormal, thick cortex, shallow gyri, and poor demarcation of gray and white matter. One patient had an anterior callosotomy that led to considerable improvement of the epilepsy. Cortical layers 5 and 6 could not be differentiated on biopsy material. The white matter was poorly myelinated and contained clusters of heterotopic neurons. This syndrome, a congenital disorder of neuronal migration, with prolonged survival, represents a mild form of lissencephaly. It can be diagnosed during life by computed tomography or magnetic resonance scanning.
    JAMA Neurology 05/1989; 46(4):430-4. DOI:10.1001/archneur.1989.00520400090025 · 7.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral dysgenesis is a subject of interest because of its relationship to cerebral development and dysfunction and to epilepsy. The authors present a detailed study of a 16-year-old boy who underwent surgery for a severe seizure disorder. This patient had dysgenesis of the right hemisphere, which was composed of a giant central frontoparietal nodular gray matter heterotopia with overlying large islands of cortical dysplasia around a displaced central fissure. Exceptional insight into the function, biochemistry, electrophysiology, and histological structure of this lesion was obtained from neurological studies that revealed complementary information: magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, [18]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (PET), functional PET scanning, proton MR spectroscopic (1H-MRS) imaging, intraoperative cortical mapping and electrocorticography, in vitro electrophysiology, and immunocytochemistry. These studies demonstrated compensatory cortical reorganization and showed that large areas of heterotopia and cortical dysplasia in the central area may retain normal motor and sensory function despite strikingly altered cytoarchitectonic organization and neuronal metabolism. Such lesions necessitate appropriate functional imaging studies prior to surgery and cortical mapping to avoid creating neurological deficits. Integrated studies, such as PET, 1H-MRS imaging, cortical mapping, immunocytochemistry, and electrophysiology may provide information on the function of developmental disorders of cerebral organization.

Publication Stats

196 Citations
26.11 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994
    • New York State
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1993
    • Laval University
      Québec, Quebec, Canada
  • 1989
    • McGill University
      • Department of Neuropathology
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada