P. C. C. Freire

Columbia University, New York, New York, United States

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Publications (191)935.96 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of the likely white dwarf companions to radio millisecond pulsars 47 Tuc Q and 47 Tuc S in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. These blue stars were found in near-ultraviolet images from the Hubble Space Telescope for which we derived accurate absolute astrometry, and are located at positions consistent with the radio coordinates to within 0.016 arcsec (0.2sigma). We present near-ultraviolet and optical colours for the previously identified companion to millisecond pulsar 47 Tuc U, and we unambiguously confirm the tentative prior identifications of the optical counterparts to 47 Tuc T and 47 Tuc Y. For the latter, we present its radio-timing solution for the first time. We find that all five near-ultraviolet counterparts have U300-B390 colours that are consistent with He white dwarf cooling models for masses ~0.16-0.3 Msun and cooling ages within ~0.1-6 Gyr. The Ha-R625 colours of 47 Tuc U and 47 Tuc T indicate the presence of a strong Ha absorption line, as expected for white dwarfs with an H envelope.
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    ABSTRACT: In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036-8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a >0.14 Msun companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946-5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a >0.02 Msun companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 ($P=4.3$ ms) in a binary system with an eccentric ($e=0.08$) orbit in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 $M_\odot$ and is most likely a white dwarf. Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities $e < 0.001$. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with larger eccentricities ($0.03 < e < 0.4$); PSR J1950+2414 is only the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for the the intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities of these systems are not compatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: something unusual happened during their formation or evolution. Some of the proposed scenarios are a) the initial evolution of the pulsar in a triple system which became dynamically unstable, b) origin in an exchange encounter in an environment with high stellar density, like that of the core of a globular cluster, c) rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar white dwarf and d) dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. We compare the properties of all five known eccentric MSPs with the predictions of these formation channels. We also outline how future measurements of the mass and proper motion of PSR J1950+2414 might allow us to firmly exclude some of the proposed formation scenarios.
    The Astrophysical Journal 04/2015; 806(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/806/1/140 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The on-going PALFA survey at the Arecibo Observatory began in 2004 and is searching for radio pulsars in the Galactic plane at 1.4 GHz. Observations since 2009 have been made with new wider-bandwidth spectrometers than were previously employed in this survey. A new data reduction pipeline has been in place since mid-2011 which consists of standard methods using dedispersion, searches for accelerated periodic sources, and search for single pulses, as well as new interference-excision strategies and candidate selection heuristics. This pipeline has been used to discover 41 pulsars, including 8 millisecond pulsars (MSPs; P < 10 ms), bringing the PALFA survey's discovery totals to 145 pulsars, including 17 MSPs, and one Fast Radio Burst (FRB). The pipeline presented here has also re-detected 188 previously known pulsars including 60 found in PALFA data by re-analyzing observations previously searched by other pipelines. A comprehensive description of the survey sensitivity, including the effect of interference and red noise, has been determined using synthetic pulsar signals with various parameters and amplitudes injected into real survey observations and subsequently recovered with the data reduction pipeline. We have confirmed that the PALFA survey achieves the sensitivity to MSPs predicted by theoretical models. However, we also find that compared to theoretical survey sensitivity models commonly used there is a degradation in sensitivity to pulsars with periods P >= 100 ms that gradually becomes up to a factor of ~10 worse for P > 4 s at DM < 150 pc/cc. This degradation of sensitivity at long periods is largely due to red noise. We find that 35 +- 3% of pulsars are missed despite being bright enough to be detected in the absence of red noise. This reduced sensitivity could have implications on estimates of the number of long-period pulsars in the Galaxy.
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    ABSTRACT: One century after its formulation, Einstein's general relativity has made remarkable predictions and turned out to be compatible with all experimental tests. Most (if not all) of these tests probe the theory in the weak-field regime, and there are theoretical and experimental reasons to believe that general relativity should be modified when gravitational fields are strong and spacetime curvature is large. The best astrophysical laboratories to probe strong-field gravity are black holes and neutron stars, whether isolated or in binary systems. We review the motivations to consider extensions of general relativity. We present a (necessarily incomplete) catalog of modified theories of gravity for which strong-field predictions have been computed and contrasted to Einstein's theory, and we summarize our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of compact objects in these theories. We discuss current bounds on modified gravity from binary pulsar and cosmological observations, and we highlight the potential of future gravitational wave measurements to inform us on the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime.
    Classical and Quantum Gravity 01/2015; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the discovery of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the PALFA Galactic plane survey using Arecibo. Four of these (PSRs J0557+1551, J1850+0244, J1902+0300, and J1943+2210) are binary pulsars whose companions are likely white dwarfs, and one (PSR J1905+0453) is isolated. Phase-coherent timing solutions, ranging from $\sim$1 to $\sim$3 years in length, and based on observations from the Jodrell Bank and Arecibo telescopes, provide precise determinations of spin, orbital, and astrometric parameters. All five pulsars have large dispersion measures ($>100$ pc cm$^{-3}$, within the top 20% of all known Galactic field MSPs) and are faint (1.4 GHz flux density < 0.1 mJy, within the faintest 5% of all known Galactic field MSPs), illustrating PALFA's ability to find increasingly faint, distant MSPs in the Galactic plane. In particular, PSR J1850+0244 has a dispersion measure of 540 pc cm$^{-3}$, the highest of all known MSPs. Such distant, faint MSPs are important input for accurately modeling the total Galactic MSP population.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2015; 800(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/800/2/123 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Globular clusters are highly efficient radio pulsar factories. These pulsars can be used as precision probes of the clusters' structure, gas content, magnetic field, and formation history; some of them are also highly interesting in their own right because they probe exotic stellar evolution scenarios as well as the physics of dense matter, accretion, and gravity. Deep searches with SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW will plausibly double to triple the known population. Such searches will only require one to a few tied-array beams, and can be done during early commissioning of the telescope - before an all-sky pulsar survey using hundreds to thousands of tied-array beams is feasible. With SKA2 it will be possible to observe most of the active radio pulsars within a large fraction of the Galactic globular clusters, an estimated population of 600 - 3700 observable pulsars (those beamed towards us). This rivals the total population of millisecond pulsars that can be found in the Galactic field; fully characterizing it will provide the best-possible physical laboratories as well as a rich dynamical history of the Galactic globular cluster system.
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    ABSTRACT: The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will use pulsars to enable precise measurements of strong gravity effects in pulsar systems, which yield tests of gravitational theories that cannot be carried out anywhere else. The Galactic census of pulsars will discover dozens of relativistic pulsar systems, possibly including pulsar -- black hole binaries which can be used to test the "cosmic censorship conjecture" and the "no-hair theorem". Also, the SKA's remarkable sensitivity will vastly improve the timing precision of millisecond pulsars, allowing probes of potential deviations from general relativity (GR). Aspects of gravitation to be explored include tests of strong equivalence principles, gravitational dipole radiation, extra field components of gravitation, gravitomagnetism, and spacetime symmetries.
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    ABSTRACT: With an average density higher than the nuclear density, neutron stars (NS) provide a unique test-ground for nuclear physics, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and nuclear superfluidity. Determination of the fundamental interactions that govern matter under such extreme conditions is one of the major unsolved problems of modern physics, and -- since it is impossible to replicate these conditions on Earth -- a major scientific motivation for SKA. The most stringent observational constraints come from measurements of NS bulk properties: each model for the microscopic behaviour of matter predicts a specific density-pressure relation (its `Equation of state', EOS). This generates a unique mass-radius relation which predicts a characteristic radius for a large range of masses and a maximum mass above which NS collapse to black holes. It also uniquely predicts other bulk quantities, like maximum spin frequency and moment of inertia. The SKA, in Phase 1 and particularly in Phase 2 will, thanks to the exquisite timing precision enabled by its raw sensitivity, and surveys that dramatically increase the number of sources: 1) Provide many more precise NS mass measurements (high mass NS measurements are particularly important for ruling out EOS models); 2) Allow the measurement of the NS moment of inertia in highly relativistic binaries such as the Double Pulsar; 3) Greatly increase the number of fast-spinning NS, with the potential discovery of spin frequencies above those allowed by some EOS models; 4) Improve our knowledge of new classes of binary pulsars such as black widows and redbacks (which may be massive as a class) through sensitive broad-band radio observations; and 5) Improve our understanding of dense matter superfluidity and the state of matter in the interior through the study of rotational glitches, provided that an ad-hoc campaign is developed.
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    ABSTRACT: PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hours. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the 5 largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M_sol, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M_sol respectively. These masses fit well in the observed collection of double neutron stars, but are also compatible with other white dwarfs around young pulsars such as J1906+0746. Neither radio pulsations nor dispersion-inducing outflows that could have further established the companion nature were detected. We derive an HI-absorption distance, which indicates that an optical confirmation of a white dwarf companion is very challenging. The pulsar is fading fast due to geodetic precession, limiting future timing improvements. We conclude that young pulsar J1906+0746 is likely part of a double neutron star, or is otherwise orbited by an older white dwarf, in an exotic system formed through two stages of mass transfer.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2014; 798(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/798/2/118 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on the determination of astrometric, spin and orbital parameters for PSR J1518+0204C, a "black widow" binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster M5. The accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing allowed us to search for the optical companion. By using WFC3/HST images we identified a very faint variable star (m_F390W > 24.8, m_F606W > 24.3, m_F814W > 23.1) located at only 0.25" from the pulsar's timing position. Due to its strong variability, this star is visible only in a sub-sample of images. However, the light curve obtained folding the available data with the orbital parameters of the pulsar shows a maximum at the pulsar inferior conjunction and a possible minimum at the pulsar superior conjunction. Furthermore, the shape of the optical modulation indicates a heating process possibly due to the pulsar wind. This is the first identification of an optical companion to a black widow pulsar in the dense stellar environment of a globular cluster.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2014; 795(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/795/1/29 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, instrumentation enabling pulsar observations with unprecedentedly high fractional bandwidth has been under development which can be used to substantially improve the precision of pulsar timing experiments. The traditional template-matching method used to calculate pulse times of arrival (ToAs) may not function effectively on these broad-band data due to a variety of effects such as diffractive scintillation in the interstellar medium, profile variation as a function of frequency, dispersion measure (DM) evolution, and so forth. In this paper, we describe the channelized discrete Fourier transform method that can greatly mitigate the influence of the aforementioned effects when measuring ToAs from broad-band timing data. The method is tested on simulated data, and its potential in improving timing precision is shown. We further apply the method to PSR J1909−3744 data collected at the Nançay Radio Telescope with the Nançay Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument. We demonstrate removal of systematics due to the scintillation effect as well as improvement on ToA measurement uncertainties. Our method also determines temporal variations in DM, which are consistent with multichannel timing approaches used earlier.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2014; 443(4). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu1420 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo ($32^{\circ}\lesssim \ell \lesssim 77^{\circ}$ and $168^{\circ}\lesssim \ell \lesssim 214^{\circ}$) close to the Galactic plane ($|b|\lesssim5^{\circ}$) for pulsars. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in $\ell$ and $|b|\lesssim1^{\circ}$) and detected 45 pulsars. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. We place 95\% confidence intervals of 82,000 to 143,000 on the number of detectable normal pulsars and 9,000 to 100,000 on the number of detectable millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk. These are consistent with previous estimates. Given the most likely population size in each case (107,000 and 15,000 for normal and millisecond pulsars, respectively) we extend survey detection simulations to predict that, when complete, the full PALFA survey should have detected $1,000\substack{+330 \\ -230}$ normal pulsars and $30\substack{+200 \\ -20}$ millisecond pulsars. Identical estimation techniques predict that $490\substack{+160 \\ -115}$ normal pulsars and $12\substack{+70 \\ -5}$ millisecond pulsars would be detected by the beginning of 2014; at the time, the PALFA survey had detected 283 normal pulsars and 31 millisecond pulsars, respectively.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2014; 787(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/787/2/137 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Double Pulsar, PSR J0737-3039A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be ~30° and ~10 neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J0737-3039A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars (ΔS) is estimated to be ~(138° ± 5°) at the current epoch and will likely remain constant until tidal interactions become important in ~85 Myr, at merger.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2014; 787(1):51. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/787/1/51 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4-GHz Pulsar ALFA survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 $\pm$ 3 pc cm$^{-3}$, pulse width of $3\; \pm 0.5$ ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude ($b = -0.2^{\circ}$), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line-of-sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.
    The Astrophysical Journal 04/2014; 790(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/790/2/101 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Double Pulsar, PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be $30^\circ$ and $10$ neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars ($\Delta_S$) is estimated to be ($138^\circ \pm 5^\circ$) at the current epoch and will likely remain constant until tidal interactions become important in $\sim$$85$ Myr, at merger.
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    ABSTRACT: We report here a series of observations of the interstellar scintillation (ISS) of the double pulsar J0737$-$3039 over the course of 18 months. As in earlier work (Coles et al., 2005) the basic phenomenon is the variation in the ISS caused by the changing transverse velocities of each pulsar, the ionized interstellar medium (IISM), and the Earth. The transverse velocity of the binary system can be determined both by VLBI and timing observations. The orbital velocity and inclination is almost completely determined from timing observations, but the direction of the orbital angular momentum is not known. Since the Earth's velocity is known, and can be compared with the orbital velocity by its effect on the timescale of the ISS, we can determine the orientation $\Omega$ of the pulsar orbit with respect to equatorial coordinates ($\Omega = 65\pm2$ deg). We also resolve the ambiguity ($i= 88.7$ or $91.3$ deg) in the inclination of the orbit deduced from the measured Shapiro delay by our estimate $i=88.1\pm0.5$ deg. This relies on analysis of the ISS over both frequency and time and provides a model for the location, anisotropy, turbulence level and transverse phase gradient of the IISM. We find that the IISM can be well-modeled during each observation, typically of a few orbital periods, but its turbulence level and mean velocity vary significantly over the 18 months.
    The Astrophysical Journal 04/2014; 787(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/787/2/161 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The globular cluster (GC) M15 (NGC 7078) is host to at least eight pulsars and two low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) one of which is also visible in the radio regime. Here we present the results of a multi-epoch global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) campaign aiming at i) measuring the proper motion of the known compact radio sources, ii) finding and classifying thus far undetected compact radio sources in the GC, and iii) detecting a signature of the putative intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) proposed to reside at the core of M15. We measure the sky motion in right ascension ($\mu_{\alpha}$) and declination ($\mu_{\delta}$) of the pulsars M15A and M15C and of the LMXB AC211 to be $(\mu_{\alpha},\,\mu_{\delta})_{\text{M15A}}=(-0.54\pm0.14,\,-4.33\pm0.25)\,$mas$\,$yr$^{-1}$, $(\mu_{\alpha},\,\mu_{\delta})_{\text{M15C}}=(-0.75\pm0.09,\,-3.52\pm0.13)\,$mas$\,$yr$^{-1}$, and $(\mu_{\alpha},\,\mu_{\delta})_{\text{AC211}}=(-0.46\pm0.08,\,-4.31\pm0.20)\,$mas$\,$yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Based on these measurements we estimate the global proper motion of M15 to be $(\mu_{\alpha},\,\mu_{\delta})=(-0.58\pm0.18,\,-4.05\pm0.34)\,$mas$\,$yr$^{-1}$. We detect two previously known but unclassified compact sources within our field of view. Our observations indicate that one them is of extragalactic origin while the other one is a foreground source, quite likely an LMXB. The double neutron star system M15C became fainter during the observations, disappeared for one year and is now observable again---an effect possibly caused by geodetic precession. The LMXB AC211 shows a double lobed structure in one of the observations indicative of an outburst during this campaign. With the inclusion of the last two of a total of seven observations we confirm the upper mass limit for a putative IMBH to be M$_{\bullet}<500$ M$_{\odot}$.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 03/2014; 565. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201323239 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surv eys using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets---the PICS(Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interferences by looking for patterns from candidate. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of up to thousands pixel of image data. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its $\sim$9000 neurons. Different from other pulsar selection programs which use pre-designed patterns, the PICS AI teaches itself the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability in recognizing various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates different from the training set. In this completely independent test, PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars, to the top 961 (1%) of 90008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. Performance of this system can be improved over time as more training data are accumulated. This AI system has been integrated into the PALFA survey pipeline and has discovered three new pulsars to date.
    The Astrophysical Journal 02/2014; DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/781/2/117 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present X-ray observations of the "redback" eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ~2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is lsim5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2014; 781(1):6-. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/781/1/6 · 6.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
935.96 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Columbia University
      • Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2009–2014
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    • University of California, Santa Cruz
      • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      Santa Cruz, California, United States
    • Politecnico di Bari
      Bari, Apulia, Italy
    • La Station de Radioastronomie de Nançay
      Orléans, Centre, France
    • Cornell University
      • Department of Astronomy
      Итак, New York, United States
  • 2000–2014
    • Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2013
    • Leibniz Universität Hannover
      Hanover, Lower Saxony, Germany
    • University of Southampton
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Southampton, England, United Kingdom
  • 2008–2013
    • West Virginia University
      • Department of Physics
      Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
  • 2012
    • Pennsylvania State University
      • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      University Park, Maryland, United States
  • 2011
    • Max Planck Institute for Astronomy
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • University of Maryland, College Park
      • Department of Astronomy
      Maryland, United States
    • The University of Manchester
      • Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics
      Manchester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • Istituto Universitario di Studi Superiori di Pavia
      Ticinum, Lombardy, Italy
    • Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert-Einstein-Institute)
      Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany
  • 2005–2009
    • University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo
      Arecibo, Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  • 2004–2008
    • National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center
      Arecibo, Arecibo, Puerto Rico
  • 2007
    • Università degli studi di Cagliari
      • Department of Physics
      Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy
  • 2004–2007
    • McGill University
      • Department of Physics
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2006
    • Arizona State University
      Phoenix, Arizona, United States
  • 2002
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States