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Publications (5)11.16 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate patient perceptions of subcutaneous denosumab or oral alendronate in postmenopausal women with or at risk for osteoporosis and how these perceptions influence adherence. METHODS: Postmenopausal women with low bone mass were randomized to denosumab 60 mg every 6 months for 1 year (treatment period 1 [TP1]) followed by alendronate 70 mg once weekly for 1 year (treatment period 2 [TP2]), or vice versa. Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire data were collected at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months; a necessity-concerns differential (NCD) was calculated for each time point. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the influences of baseline characteristics on nonadherence. RESULTS: Participants included 250 women (alendronate/denosumab, n = 124; denosumab/alendronate, n = 126). During TP1, the NCD at month 6 was higher with denosumab than with alendronate (P = 0.0076). In TP2, the NCD was higher for women switched to denosumab than for women switched to alendronate at 6 months (P = 0.0126) and 12 months (P = 0.4605). Denosumab was preferred to alendronate regardless of treatment sequence (P < 0.0001). Covariate analysis revealed that higher TP2 baseline necessity scores were associated with lower odds of nonadherence (P = 0.0055), whereas higher concerns about medication scores were associated with higher odds of nonadherence (P = 0.0247). Higher NCD scores were also associated with lower odds of nonadherence (P = 0.0015). CONCLUSIONS: Participants preferred denosumab to alendronate while on treatment and had more positive perceptions of denosumab than alendronate. These perceptions were associated with better adherence.
    Menopause (New York, N.Y.) 05/2013; · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The final analysis of this 2-year, randomized, crossover study showed that postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were more adherent, compliant, and persistent with subcutaneous denosumab injections every 6 months than with once-weekly alendronate tablets. After receiving both treatments, women reported greater satisfaction with injectable denosumab and preferred it over oral alendronate. Osteoporosis patients who are non-compliant or non-persistent with therapy may have suboptimal clinical outcomes. This 2-year, randomized, open-label, crossover study compared treatment adherence between subcutaneous denosumab, 60 mg every 6 months, and oral alendronate, 70 mg once weekly. Postmenopausal women at 25 centers in the USA and Canada with bone mineral density T-scores -4.0 to -2.0 and no prior bisphosphonate use received alendronate then denosumab, or denosumab then alendronate, over successive 12-month periods. Adherence required both compliance (denosumab injections 6 months apart or ≥ 80% of alendronate tablets) and persistence (both denosumab injections or ≥ 2 alendronate doses in the last month and completion of the treatment period). Of the 250 women enrolled (124 alendronate, 126 denosumab), 221 entered the second year (106 denosumab, 115 alendronate). Denosumab was associated with less non-adherence than alendronate (first year, 11.9% vs 23.4%; second year, 7.5% vs 36.5%). Risk ratios for non-adherence, non-compliance, and non-persistence favored denosumab in both years (p < 0.05). Of 198 subjects expressing treatment preference, 183 (92.4%) preferred the injections over the oral therapy. BMD improved further when subjects received denosumab after alendronate and remained stable when they received alendronate after denosumab. Based on the final results of this crossover study after women had received each treatment for up to 1 year, postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were more adherent, compliant, and persistent with subcutaneous denosumab injections every 6 months than with once-weekly alendronate tablets and reported increased treatment preference and satisfaction with injectable denosumab over oral alendronate.
    Osteoporosis International 09/2011; 23(1):317-26. · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, 250 women with osteoporosis were randomized to 12 months with subcutaneous denosumab 60 mg every 6 months or oral alendronate 70 mg once weekly, then crossed over to the other treatment. The primary endpoint, treatment adherence at 12 months, was 76.6% for alendronate and 87.3% for denosumab. The purpose of this study is to evaluate treatment adherence with subcutaneous denosumab 60 mg every 6 months or oral alendronate 70 mg once weekly. In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, 2-year, crossover study, 250 postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density received denosumab or alendronate for 12 months, then the other treatment for 12 months. The alendronate bottle had a medication event monitoring system cap to monitor administration dates. Definitions were as follows: compliance, receiving both denosumab doses 6 (± 1) months apart or 80-100% of alendronate doses; persistence, receiving both denosumab doses and completing the month 12 visit within the visit window or ≥ 2 alendronate doses in the final month; adherence, achieving both compliance and persistence. This report includes data from the first 12 months. The primary study endpoint, adherence in the first 12 months, was 76.6% (95/124) for alendronate and 87.3% (110/126) for denosumab. Risk ratios for denosumab compared with alendronate at 12 months were 0.58 (p = 0.043) for non-adherence, 0.48 (p = 0.014) for non-compliance, and 0.54 (p = 0.049) for non-persistence. Subject ratings for treatment necessity, preference, and satisfaction were significantly greater for denosumab and ratings for treatment bother were significantly greater for alendronate. Adverse events were reported by 64.1% of alendronate-treated subjects and 72.0% of denosumab-treated subjects (p = 0.403). The most common adverse events were arthralgia, back pain, pain in extremity, cough, and headache (each in <10% of subjects in each group). Significantly greater treatment adherence was observed for subcutaneous administration of denosumab every 6 months than for oral alendronate once weekly.
    Osteoporosis International 06/2011; 22(6):1725-35. · 4.04 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Clinical Densitometry - J CLIN DENSITOM. 01/2011; 14(2):158-159.
  • Journal of Clinical Densitometry - J CLIN DENSITOM. 01/2011; 14(2):159-159.